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a bit of an unusual one.. but I was wondering if anyone knew how I could declare a reserved word as a variable. I have the following code, but it does not like my use of the long variable name. I know I could rename it, but for instrest sakes I would like to know if this is at all possible.

private string lat;
private string long;

public string Lat 
{ 
    get
    {
        return lat;                
    }
}

public string Long 
{ 
    get
    {
        return long;
    }
}
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3  
Consider using the somewhat longer but more descriptive latitude and longitude. –  Guffa May 7 '10 at 10:18
7  
Consider not making latitude and longitude strings; they are logically angles, not strings. –  Eric Lippert May 7 '10 at 15:19
    
Consider deserializing or automapping a response object from a poorly-designed API that didn't consider reserved words (e.g. response.location.long)! –  jkoreska Feb 10 '14 at 21:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 44 down vote accepted

Yes, you can if you really want to:

private string @long;

The actual name of the variable (as reported by reflection etc) is just long; the @ sign tells the compiler to ignore the fact that it's also a keyword.

I would very strongly advise against this, however.

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4  
I'd agree. They're reserved for a reason. Talk about code clarity and maintainability, let alone bug resolution and you'll see why. –  ChrisBD May 7 '10 at 10:11
    
I saw an answer posted to this site containing a code snippet where every identifier was prefixed with @. Quite a flak attack on that one. Haven't seen him back. –  Hans Passant May 7 '10 at 12:26
2  
@Hans, A code generator might prefix each id. Would be the smart thing to do. –  Henk Holterman May 7 '10 at 23:25

As others have mentioned, you can escape a reserved word with '@'.

In your example you don't really need to, I would write the property like this:

private string _long;
public string Long 
{ 
    get
    {
        return _long;
    }
}

And the underscore and the capital L make it compile.

But it's kind of a tradition to call them Lat and Lon

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Yes, you can. Using the @ symbol.
This will work, for example: private string @long;
Doing this is highly not recommended, but it is possible.

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Not an answer I know as I would steer clear of using reserved words as variable names, but if you insist then at least use the following:

private string lat;
private string @long;

public string Lat 
{ 
    get
    {
        return this.lat;                
    }
}

public string Long 
{ 
    get
    {
        return this.long;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I may be late to this party, but I thought I would throw in another place where using a reserved word as a variable name is a good idea!!

I am writing a web control, where I want one of the properties to be "class" in a similar manner as other elements have a "class" property.

So, indeed I will make my property be: "public string @class {get{} set{}}"

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1  
Property names by convention are capitalized. Besides, the standard name for that property is className. –  Raymond Chen Jul 12 '13 at 7:15

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