Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this code

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Test{
   public:
      int a;

      Test(int i=0):a(i){}
      ~Test(){
         cout << a << endl;
      }

      Test(const Test &){
         cout << "copy" << endl;
      }

      void operator=(const Test &){
         cout << "=" << endl;
      }

      Test operator+(Test& p){
         Test res(a+p.a);
         return res;
      }
};

int main (int argc, char const *argv[]){
   Test t1(10), t2(20);
   Test t3=t1+t2;
   return 0;
}

Output:

30
20
10

Why isn't the copy constructor called here?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

This is a special case called Return Value Optimization in which the compiler is allowed to optimize away temporaries.

share|improve this answer

I assume you're wondering about the line Test t3=t1+t2;

The compiler is allowed to optimize the copy construction away. See http://www.gotw.ca/gotw/001.htm.

share|improve this answer
    
mkj : Excellent Link!..:) –  LinuxPenseur Jan 11 '12 at 10:10

As the others said, its just optimizing the call to the copy constructor, here what happens if you disable those optimizations.

barricada ~$ g++ -o test test.cpp -O0 -fno-elide-constructors
barricada ~$ ./test
copy
30
copy
134515065
-1217015820
20
10
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.