Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is my code:

ThreadStart threadStart = controller.OpenFile;
Thread thread = new Thread(threadStart);
thread.Start();

In the OpenFile function, my code looks like:

System.Console.Error.WriteLine("Launching");

The code in OpenFile doesn't get executed for 30 seconds exactly. It starts immediately on my machine, but in our production environment it takes 30 seconds before that print statement will execute.

Is there a setting or something that might be doing this? Where would I start looking?

share|improve this question
1  
Please provide a short but complete program which demonstrates the problem. Also give us details about your production machine - hardware, OS etc. –  Jon Skeet Nov 10 '08 at 19:19
    
The details of the rest of the program aren't important. All that's important is how I'm calling the function using ThreadStart and that it takes 30 seconds for the code in the function to run. You won't see this on your development machine. –  Jon Nov 10 '08 at 19:22
1  
How can you know what's important and what's not when you don't know why it's happening? I strongly recommend that you try to produce a short but complete program that demonstrates the problem on your production machine. –  Jon Skeet Nov 10 '08 at 19:40
1  
The details are important. See my short but complete program that doesn't demonstrate the problem (and also actually compiles). –  Roger Lipscombe Nov 10 '08 at 20:12
    
Is controller in a separate assembly? Is that assembly digitally signed? Does the certificate have a revocation list? Is the production environment able to resolve the revocation list URL? –  Roger Lipscombe Nov 10 '08 at 20:15

8 Answers 8

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As others pointed out - first try to produce a test program which demonstrates the behavior.

If you can't, try to troubleshoot by: 1. Call the method directly, not in thread, and see how it behaves. 2. Comment out the rest of the code besides the System.Error.WriteLine line

If you still see the the delay in (1), but not in (2), then try to attach to AppDomain.AssemblyLoad Event. I have seen this happen when in the called method there is a call to a web service (it generates a serialization assembly on the fly, so it takes time), or if there is a first reference to external assembly, and it takes time to find and load it. It's very rare, but I had to deal with this, so it's worth trying.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you're onto something here. I just did this and two assemblies were getting loaded in between. How exactly did you deal with this? –  Jon Nov 10 '08 at 20:33
    
Hack :) - Depends on what assemblies your app loads - if these are normal assemblies, load them manually on application start (you can do it on separate thread to not delay the app itself). –  Sunny Milenov Nov 10 '08 at 21:55

Do you have the same problem if you use other threading methods (for example, Threadpool)? This would tell if it's related to this method of threading, or to all methods. Also, is that WriteLine statement the only statement in your OpenFile procedure? 30 seconds is a common timeout length so maybe that's what's happening here.

Other than that, I'm not sure why the thread handler would pause for 30 seconds before processing.

share|improve this answer
    
The first statement is the writeline and it takes 30 seconds to execute. It might be a timeout but it's hard to know from what exactly. –  Jon Nov 10 '08 at 19:26

Unfortunately jeremyZX answered in a comment, so it can't be voted up, but "If you're looking for an output to a log file, there may be a 30 second timeout for whichever tracelistener you're working with before entries are flushed" is well worth looking at. Any time you see a human-perceptible delay in a system, timeout-related code is one of the first things to check. Especially if you see a delay that falls upon some timeout-like integer of 10, 30, 60 seconds...

share|improve this answer
    
Didn't think it was worth an answer, so I'll vote you up for promoting my idea ;) –  Jeremy Frey Nov 10 '08 at 21:06

My first step would be to build a test version of the app that calls the OpenFile function the normal way (without using threads), and see if you still get the delay.

share|improve this answer

I can't reproduce this problem. The following program doesn't suffer from a 30-second delay:

using System;
using System.Threading;

namespace Net_Threading_Problem
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            Controller controller = new Controller();
            ThreadStart threadStart = controller.OpenFile;
            Thread thread = new Thread(threadStart);
            thread.Start();

            thread.Join();
        }
    }

    internal class Controller
    {
        public void OpenFile()
        {
            Console.Error.WriteLine("Launching");
        }
    }
}

Could you provide some more context? Ideally, a short but complete program that demonstrates the problem.

And doesn't have any compilation errors...

share|improve this answer

Maybe you are experiencing thread starvation, meaning that your thread doesn't get quantum of execution because there are threads with higher priority executing in your process. If this higher level thread is present only in your production environment and not in your testing environment this could be cause for different results.

share|improve this answer

Sometimes output (Console, StreamWriters, etc.) can be delayed due to flushing issues. If you can, use a better logging platform such as log4net or NLog which will record the timestamp at which the method is actually called. I sometimes use the "OutputDebugString" functionality of log4net along with DebugView from SysInternals for a more realistic output although even that is susceptible to timing delays.

The issue you are describing seems like a caching or performance setting and I would suspect it is actually being called instantly.

share|improve this answer

Is your application having to load other assemblies into memory, assemblies which might be in memory on your computer already? .NET applications do not start up instantly, and more assemblies means more loading time. You might try pre-compiling with the Native Image Generator.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.