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When including the line

*.py diff=python

in a local .gitattributes file, git diff produces nice labels for the different diff hunks of Python files (with the name of the function where the changes are, etc.).

Is is possible to ask git to use this diff mode for all Python files across all git projects? I tried to set a global ~/.gitattributes, but it is not used by local git repositories. Is there a more convenient method than initializing each new git project with a ln -s ~/.gitattributes?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Quoting from gitattributes(5):

Attributes that should affect all repositories for a single user should be placed in a file specified by the core.attributesfile configuration option (see git-config(1)). Its default value is $XDG_CONFIG_HOME/git/attributes. If $XDG_CONFIG_HOME is either not set or empty, $HOME/.config/git/attributes is used instead. Attributes for all users on a system should be placed in the $(prefix)/etc/gitattributes file.

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1  
This works (with git 1.8.4), thanks! It seems that *.py diff=python is actually now the default, though, so the particular case of my original question does not seem to be relevant anymore. It's good to know that there is a user-level attributes file, in any case! –  EOL Sep 23 '13 at 13:30

To tell git to use ~/.gitattributes you need to put this in ~/.gitconfig:

[core]
  attributesfile = ~/.gitattributes
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+1. Thanks. This is interesting, but doesn't this precludes the use of a local .gitattributes for local settings? I was wondering whether it would be possible to have some attributes common to all projects, that could be customized locally. –  EOL Dec 18 '11 at 20:08

No, git only looks for attributes locally: .gitattributes and .git/info/attributes

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