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How to calculate the difference in time in minutes for the following timestamp in python

  2010-01-01 17:31:22
 2010-01-03 17:31:22
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3  
not sure if it is possible, but you should change your accepted answer since the one you picked doesn't work in all cases, and might cause people problems. –  Ken Cochrane Jul 25 '13 at 14:11

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted
from datetime import datetime

fmt = '%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S'
d1 = datetime.strptime('2010-01-01 17:31:22', fmt)
d2 = datetime.strptime('2010-01-03 17:31:22', fmt)

print (d2-d1).days * 24 * 60
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5  
This doesn't convert the it to difference in minutes, for example with the following datetimes: <code>datetime(2005, 7, 14, 18, 30) - datetime(2005, 7, 14, 15, 30)</code> It will just give back 0 –  Sam Stoelinga Jan 22 '11 at 20:21
2  
@Sam S see my answer below it handles the case you are referring to. –  Ken Cochrane Jul 29 '11 at 21:09

The accepted answer above doesn't work in cases where the dates don't have the same exact time.

original problem:

from datetime import datetime

fmt = '%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S'
d1 = datetime.strptime('2010-01-01 17:31:22', fmt)
d2 = datetime.strptime('2010-01-03 17:31:22', fmt)

daysDiff = (d2-d1).days
print daysDiff
> 2

# convert days to minutes
minutesDiff = daysDiff * 24 * 60

print minutesDiff
> 2880

d2-d1 gives you a datetime.timedelta and when you use days it will only show you the days in the timedelta. In this case it works fine, but if you would have the following.

from datetime import datetime

fmt = '%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S'
d1 = datetime.strptime('2010-01-01 16:31:22', fmt)
d2 = datetime.strptime('2010-01-03 20:15:14', fmt)

daysDiff = (d2-d1).days
print daysDiff
> 2

# convert days to minutes
minutesDiff = daysDiff * 24 * 60

print minutesDiff
> 2880  # that is wrong

It would have still given you the same answer since it still returns 2 for days, it ignores the hour, min and second from the timedelta.

A better approach would be to convert the dates to a common format and then do the calculation. The easiest way to do this is to convert them to unix timestamps. Here is the code to do that.

from datetime import datetime
import time

fmt = '%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S'
d1 = datetime.strptime('2010-01-01 17:31:22', fmt)
d2 = datetime.strptime('2010-01-03 20:15:14', fmt)

# convert to unix timestamp
d1_ts = time.mktime(d1.timetuple())
d2_ts = time.mktime(d2.timetuple())

# they are now in seconds, subtract and then divide by 60 to get minutes.
print int(d2_ts-d1_ts) / 60
> 3043  # much better
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Great Answer @ken :) –  Avi Mehenwal Jun 24 '14 at 7:01
    
This isn't working for me, I have two values that are typically 50-100 seconds apart, but when I use this it returns a value somewhere in the range of -17K to -18K. any idea why this may be? (I'm using the code exactly as written, except the given dates are different). –  thnkwthprtls Dec 2 '14 at 18:43
    
time.mktime() may take into account the changes in the local utc offset on some platforms (it also may fail if input is an ambiguous local time such as during a end-of-DST transition). To get consistent results on all platforms, you could use pytz timezones (such as returned by tzlocal.get_localzone() call) to get aware datetime objects -- to get the correct elapsed time (ignoring leap seconds). –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 21 at 9:27

Use datetime.strptime() to parse into datetime instances, and then compute the difference, and finally convert the difference into minutes.

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In case someone doesn't realize it, one way to do this would be to combine Christophe and RSabet's answers:

from datetime import datetime
import time

fmt = '%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S'
d1 = datetime.strptime('2010-01-01 17:31:22', fmt)
d2 = datetime.strptime('2010-01-03 20:15:14', fmt)

diff = d2 -d1
diff_minutes = (diff.days * 24 * 60) + (diff.seconds/60)

print(diff_minutes)
> 3043
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this method fails if the utc corresponding to d1 is different from the one for d2. To take into account the utc offset, see the solution in @Ken Cochrane's answer and my comment there –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 21 at 9:29

To calcul with different time date

from datetime import datetime

fmt = '%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S'
d1 = datetime.strptime('2010-01-01 16:31:22', fmt)
d2 = datetime.strptime('2010-01-03 20:15:14', fmt)

diff = d2-d1
diff_minutes = diff.seconds/60
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2  
This method is not correct, it ignores the difference in days. –  Moberg Nov 13 '14 at 8:20

The result depends on the timezone that corresponds to the input time strings.

The simplest case if both dates use the same utc offset:

#!/usr/bin/env python3
from datetime import datetime, timedelta

time_format = "%Y-%d-%m %H:%M:%S"
dt1 = datetime.strptime("2010-01-01 17:31:22", time_format)
dt2 = datetime.strptime("2010-01-03 17:31:22", time_format)
print((dt2 - dt1) // timedelta(minutes=1)) # minutes

If your Python version doesn't support td // timedelta; replace it with int(td.total_seconds() // 60).

If the input time is in the local timezone that might have different utc offset at different times e.g., it has daylight saving time then you should make dt1, dt2 into aware datetime objects before finding the difference, to take into account the possible changes in the utc offset.

The portable way to make an aware local datetime objects is to use pytz timezones:

#!/usr/bin/env python
from datetime import timedelta
import tzlocal # $ pip install tzlocal

local_tz = tzlocal.get_localzone() # get pytz timezone
aware_dt1, aware_dt2 = map(local_tz.localize, [dt1, dt2])
td  = aware_dt2 - aware_dt1 # elapsed time

If either dt1 or dt2 correspond to an ambiguous time then the default is_dst=False is used to disambiguate. You could set is_dst=None to raise an exception for ambiguous or non-existent local times instead.

If you can't install 3rd party modules then time.mktime() could be used from @Ken Cochrane's answer that can find the correct utc offset on some platforms for some dates in some timezones -- if you don't need a consistent (but perhaps wrong) result then it is much better than doing dt2 - dt1 with naive datetime objects that always fails if the corresponding utc offsets are different.

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After reading your answer I got your point. Nice! –  moooeeeep Apr 21 at 15:23

As was kind of said already, you need to use datetime.datetime's strptime method:

from datetime import datetime

fmt = '%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S'
d1 = datetime.strptime('2010-01-01 17:31:22', fmt)
d2 = datetime.strptime('2010-01-03 17:31:22', fmt)

daysDiff = (d2-d1).days

# convert days to minutes
minutesDiff = daysDiff * 24 * 60

print minutesDiff
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