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In SQL Server 2005, we can create temp tables one of two ways:

declare @tmp table (Col1 int, Col2 int);

or

create table #tmp (Col1 int, Col2 int);

What are the differences between the two? I have read conflicting opinions on whether @tmp still uses tempdb, or if everything happens in memory.

In which scenarios does one out-perform the other?

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2  
This link is in my bookmarks. Very good explanation. –  Iain Holder Aug 26 '08 at 12:30
6  
Also see my answer here –  Martin Smith Apr 12 '12 at 18:51
    
There's a really good write up by Pinal Dave here... blog.sqlauthority.com/2009/12/15/… –  sam yi Oct 3 '13 at 19:54
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9 Answers

up vote 183 down vote accepted

There are a few differences between Temporary Tables (#tmp) and Table Variables (@tmp), although using tempdb isn't one of them, as spelt out in the MSDN link below.

As a rule of thumb, for small to medium volumes of data and simple usage scenarios you should use table variables. (This is an overly broad guideline with of course lots of exceptions - see below and following articles.)

Some points to consider when choosing between them:

  • Temporary Tables are real tables so you can do things like CREATE INDEXes, etc. If you have large amounts of data for which accessing by index will be faster then temporary tables are a good option.

  • Table variables can have indexes by using PRIMARY KEY or UNIQUE constraints. (If you want a non-unique index just include the primary key column as the last column in the unique constraint. If you don't have a unique column, you can use an identity column.) SQL 2014 has non-unique indexes too.

  • Table variables don't participate in transactions, logging or locking. This means they're faster as they don't require the overhead, but conversely you don't get those features. So for instance if you want to ROLLBACK midway through a procedure then table variables populated during that transaction will still be populated!

  • Temp tables might result in stored procedures being recompiled, perhaps often. Table variables will not.

  • You can create a temp table using SELECT INTO, which can be quicker to write (good for ad-hoc querying) and may allow you to deal with changing datatypes over time, since you don't need to define your temp table structure upfront.

  • You can pass table variables back from functions, enabling you to encapsulate and reuse logic much easier (eg make a function to split a string into a table of values on some arbitrary delimiter).

  • Using Table Variables within user-defined functions enables those functions to be used more widely (see CREATE FUNCTION documentation for details). If you're writing a function you should use table variables over temp tables unless there's a compelling need otherwise.

  • Both table variables and temp tables are stored in tempdb. This means you should be aware of issues such as COLLATION problems if your database collation is different to your server collation; temp tables and table variables will by default inherit the collation of the server, causing problems if you want to compare data in them with data in your database.

  • Global Temp Tables (##tmp) are another type of temp table available to all sessions and users.

Some further reading:

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16  
Table variables can have indexes. Just create a unique constraint, and you automatically get an index. Makes a huge performance difference. (If you don't want a unique index, just add the actual primary key on the end of the fields you want. If you haven't got one, create an identity column). –  Ben Mar 4 '11 at 15:17
3  
@Ben And SQL Server 2014 allows non unique indexes to be specified on table variables –  Martin Smith Jul 2 '13 at 6:32
    
Table variables not being affected by transactions is handy sometimes. If you have anything you want to keep after a rollback, you can put it in a table variable. –  quillbreaker Oct 22 '13 at 16:59
    
Statistics are created for temp tables, which can make query plans better, but not for table variables. These statistics are cached for a while, along witht the temp table's pages, after the temp table is dropped and may be inaccurate should the cached table be re-activated. –  Michael Green Apr 27 at 13:28
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Just looking at the claim in the accepted answer that table variables don't participate in logging.

It seems generally untrue that there is any difference in quantity of logging (at least for insert/update/delete operations to the table itself though I have since found that there is some small difference in this respect for cached temporary objects in stored procedures due to additional system table updates).

I looked at the logging behaviour against both a @table_variable and a #temp table for the following operations.

  1. Successful Insert
  2. Multi Row Insert where statement rolled back due to constraint violation.
  3. Update
  4. Delete
  5. Deallocate

The transaction log records were almost identical for all operations.

The table variable version actually has a few extra log entries because it gets an entry added to (and later removed from) the sys.syssingleobjrefs base table but overall had a few less bytes logged purely as the internal name for table variables consumes 236 less bytes than for #temp tables (118 fewer nvarchar characters).

Full script to reproduce (best run on an instance started in single user mode and using sqlcmd mode)

:setvar tablename "@T" 
:setvar tablescript "DECLARE @T TABLE"

/*
 --Uncomment this section to test a #temp table
:setvar tablename "#T" 
:setvar tablescript "CREATE TABLE #T"
*/

USE tempdb 
GO    
CHECKPOINT

DECLARE @LSN NVARCHAR(25)

SELECT @LSN = MAX([Current LSN])
FROM fn_dblog(null, null) 


EXEC(N'BEGIN TRAN StartBatch
SAVE TRAN StartBatch
COMMIT

$(tablescript)
(
[4CA996AC-C7E1-48B5-B48A-E721E7A435F0] INT PRIMARY KEY DEFAULT 0,
InRowFiller char(7000) DEFAULT ''A'',
OffRowFiller varchar(8000) DEFAULT REPLICATE(''B'',8000),
LOBFiller varchar(max) DEFAULT REPLICATE(cast(''C'' as varchar(max)),10000)
)


BEGIN TRAN InsertFirstRow
SAVE TRAN InsertFirstRow
COMMIT

INSERT INTO $(tablename)
DEFAULT VALUES

BEGIN TRAN Insert9Rows
SAVE TRAN Insert9Rows
COMMIT


INSERT INTO $(tablename) ([4CA996AC-C7E1-48B5-B48A-E721E7A435F0])
SELECT TOP 9 ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY (SELECT 0))
FROM sys.all_columns

BEGIN TRAN InsertFailure
SAVE TRAN InsertFailure
COMMIT


/*Try and Insert 10 rows, the 10th one will cause a constraint violation*/
BEGIN TRY
INSERT INTO $(tablename) ([4CA996AC-C7E1-48B5-B48A-E721E7A435F0])
SELECT TOP (10) (10 + ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY (SELECT 0))) % 20
FROM sys.all_columns
END TRY
BEGIN CATCH
PRINT ERROR_MESSAGE()
END CATCH

BEGIN TRAN Update10Rows
SAVE TRAN Update10Rows
COMMIT

UPDATE $(tablename)
SET InRowFiller = LOWER(InRowFiller),
    OffRowFiller  =LOWER(OffRowFiller),
    LOBFiller  =LOWER(LOBFiller)


BEGIN TRAN Delete10Rows
SAVE TRAN Delete10Rows
COMMIT

DELETE FROM  $(tablename)
BEGIN TRAN AfterDelete
SAVE TRAN AfterDelete
COMMIT

BEGIN TRAN EndBatch
SAVE TRAN EndBatch
COMMIT')


DECLARE @LSN_HEX NVARCHAR(25) = 
        CAST(CAST(CONVERT(varbinary,SUBSTRING(@LSN, 1, 8),2) AS INT) AS VARCHAR) + ':' +
        CAST(CAST(CONVERT(varbinary,SUBSTRING(@LSN, 10, 8),2) AS INT) AS VARCHAR) + ':' +
        CAST(CAST(CONVERT(varbinary,SUBSTRING(@LSN, 19, 4),2) AS INT) AS VARCHAR)        

SELECT 
    [Operation],
    [Context],
    [AllocUnitName],
    [Transaction Name],
    [Description]
FROM   fn_dblog(@LSN_HEX, null) AS D
WHERE  [Current LSN] > @LSN  

SELECT CASE
         WHEN GROUPING(Operation) = 1 THEN 'Total'
         ELSE Operation
       END AS Operation,
       Context,
       AllocUnitName,
       COALESCE(SUM([Log Record Length]), 0) AS [Size in Bytes],
       COUNT(*)                              AS Cnt
FROM   fn_dblog(@LSN_HEX, null) AS D
WHERE  [Current LSN] > @LSN  
GROUP BY GROUPING SETS((Operation, Context, AllocUnitName),())

Results

+-----------------------+--------------------+---------------------------+---------------+------+---------------+------+------------------+
|                       |                    |                           |             @TV      |             #TV      |                  |
+-----------------------+--------------------+---------------------------+---------------+------+---------------+------+------------------+
| Operation             | Context            | AllocUnitName             | Size in Bytes | Cnt  | Size in Bytes | Cnt  | Difference Bytes |
+-----------------------+--------------------+---------------------------+---------------+------+---------------+------+------------------+
| LOP_ABORT_XACT        | LCX_NULL           |                           | 52            | 1    | 52            | 1    |                  |
| LOP_BEGIN_XACT        | LCX_NULL           |                           | 6056          | 50   | 6056          | 50   |                  |
| LOP_COMMIT_XACT       | LCX_NULL           |                           | 2548          | 49   | 2548          | 49   |                  |
| LOP_COUNT_DELTA       | LCX_CLUSTERED      | sys.sysallocunits.clust   | 624           | 3    | 624           | 3    |                  |
| LOP_COUNT_DELTA       | LCX_CLUSTERED      | sys.sysrowsets.clust      | 208           | 1    | 208           | 1    |                  |
| LOP_COUNT_DELTA       | LCX_CLUSTERED      | sys.sysrscols.clst        | 832           | 4    | 832           | 4    |                  |
| LOP_CREATE_ALLOCCHAIN | LCX_NULL           |                           | 120           | 3    | 120           | 3    |                  |
| LOP_DELETE_ROWS       | LCX_INDEX_INTERIOR | Unknown Alloc Unit        | 720           | 9    | 720           | 9    |                  |
| LOP_DELETE_ROWS       | LCX_MARK_AS_GHOST  | sys.sysallocunits.clust   | 444           | 3    | 444           | 3    |                  |
| LOP_DELETE_ROWS       | LCX_MARK_AS_GHOST  | sys.sysallocunits.nc      | 276           | 3    | 276           | 3    |                  |
| LOP_DELETE_ROWS       | LCX_MARK_AS_GHOST  | sys.syscolpars.clst       | 628           | 4    | 628           | 4    |                  |
| LOP_DELETE_ROWS       | LCX_MARK_AS_GHOST  | sys.syscolpars.nc         | 484           | 4    | 484           | 4    |                  |
| LOP_DELETE_ROWS       | LCX_MARK_AS_GHOST  | sys.sysidxstats.clst      | 176           | 1    | 176           | 1    |                  |
| LOP_DELETE_ROWS       | LCX_MARK_AS_GHOST  | sys.sysidxstats.nc        | 144           | 1    | 144           | 1    |                  |
| LOP_DELETE_ROWS       | LCX_MARK_AS_GHOST  | sys.sysiscols.clst        | 100           | 1    | 100           | 1    |                  |
| LOP_DELETE_ROWS       | LCX_MARK_AS_GHOST  | sys.sysiscols.nc1         | 88            | 1    | 88            | 1    |                  |
| LOP_DELETE_ROWS       | LCX_MARK_AS_GHOST  | sys.sysobjvalues.clst     | 596           | 5    | 596           | 5    |                  |
| LOP_DELETE_ROWS       | LCX_MARK_AS_GHOST  | sys.sysrowsets.clust      | 132           | 1    | 132           | 1    |                  |
| LOP_DELETE_ROWS       | LCX_MARK_AS_GHOST  | sys.sysrscols.clst        | 528           | 4    | 528           | 4    |                  |
| LOP_DELETE_ROWS       | LCX_MARK_AS_GHOST  | sys.sysschobjs.clst       | 1040          | 6    | 1276          | 6    | 236              |
| LOP_DELETE_ROWS       | LCX_MARK_AS_GHOST  | sys.sysschobjs.nc1        | 820           | 6    | 1060          | 6    | 240              |
| LOP_DELETE_ROWS       | LCX_MARK_AS_GHOST  | sys.sysschobjs.nc2        | 820           | 6    | 1060          | 6    | 240              |
| LOP_DELETE_ROWS       | LCX_MARK_AS_GHOST  | sys.sysschobjs.nc3        | 480           | 6    | 480           | 6    |                  |
| LOP_DELETE_ROWS       | LCX_MARK_AS_GHOST  | sys.syssingleobjrefs.clst | 96            | 1    |               |      | -96              |
| LOP_DELETE_ROWS       | LCX_MARK_AS_GHOST  | sys.syssingleobjrefs.nc1  | 88            | 1    |               |      | -88              |
| LOP_DELETE_ROWS       | LCX_MARK_AS_GHOST  | Unknown Alloc Unit        | 72092         | 19   | 72092         | 19   |                  |
| LOP_DELETE_ROWS       | LCX_TEXT_MIX       | Unknown Alloc Unit        | 16348         | 37   | 16348         | 37   |                  |
| LOP_FORMAT_PAGE       | LCX_HEAP           | Unknown Alloc Unit        | 1596          | 19   | 1596          | 19   |                  |
| LOP_FORMAT_PAGE       | LCX_IAM            | Unknown Alloc Unit        | 252           | 3    | 252           | 3    |                  |
| LOP_FORMAT_PAGE       | LCX_INDEX_INTERIOR | Unknown Alloc Unit        | 84            | 1    | 84            | 1    |                  |
| LOP_FORMAT_PAGE       | LCX_TEXT_MIX       | Unknown Alloc Unit        | 4788          | 57   | 4788          | 57   |                  |
| LOP_HOBT_DDL          | LCX_NULL           |                           | 108           | 3    | 108           | 3    |                  |
| LOP_HOBT_DELTA        | LCX_NULL           |                           | 9600          | 150  | 9600          | 150  |                  |
| LOP_INSERT_ROWS       | LCX_CLUSTERED      | sys.sysallocunits.clust   | 456           | 3    | 456           | 3    |                  |
| LOP_INSERT_ROWS       | LCX_CLUSTERED      | sys.syscolpars.clst       | 644           | 4    | 644           | 4    |                  |
| LOP_INSERT_ROWS       | LCX_CLUSTERED      | sys.sysidxstats.clst      | 180           | 1    | 180           | 1    |                  |
| LOP_INSERT_ROWS       | LCX_CLUSTERED      | sys.sysiscols.clst        | 104           | 1    | 104           | 1    |                  |
| LOP_INSERT_ROWS       | LCX_CLUSTERED      | sys.sysobjvalues.clst     | 616           | 5    | 616           | 5    |                  |
| LOP_INSERT_ROWS       | LCX_CLUSTERED      | sys.sysrowsets.clust      | 136           | 1    | 136           | 1    |                  |
| LOP_INSERT_ROWS       | LCX_CLUSTERED      | sys.sysrscols.clst        | 544           | 4    | 544           | 4    |                  |
| LOP_INSERT_ROWS       | LCX_CLUSTERED      | sys.sysschobjs.clst       | 1064          | 6    | 1300          | 6    | 236              |
| LOP_INSERT_ROWS       | LCX_CLUSTERED      | sys.syssingleobjrefs.clst | 100           | 1    |               |      | -100             |
| LOP_INSERT_ROWS       | LCX_CLUSTERED      | Unknown Alloc Unit        | 135888        | 19   | 135888        | 19   |                  |
| LOP_INSERT_ROWS       | LCX_INDEX_INTERIOR | Unknown Alloc Unit        | 1596          | 19   | 1596          | 19   |                  |
| LOP_INSERT_ROWS       | LCX_INDEX_LEAF     | sys.sysallocunits.nc      | 288           | 3    | 288           | 3    |                  |
| LOP_INSERT_ROWS       | LCX_INDEX_LEAF     | sys.syscolpars.nc         | 500           | 4    | 500           | 4    |                  |
| LOP_INSERT_ROWS       | LCX_INDEX_LEAF     | sys.sysidxstats.nc        | 148           | 1    | 148           | 1    |                  |
| LOP_INSERT_ROWS       | LCX_INDEX_LEAF     | sys.sysiscols.nc1         | 92            | 1    | 92            | 1    |                  |
| LOP_INSERT_ROWS       | LCX_INDEX_LEAF     | sys.sysschobjs.nc1        | 844           | 6    | 1084          | 6    | 240              |
| LOP_INSERT_ROWS       | LCX_INDEX_LEAF     | sys.sysschobjs.nc2        | 844           | 6    | 1084          | 6    | 240              |
| LOP_INSERT_ROWS       | LCX_INDEX_LEAF     | sys.sysschobjs.nc3        | 504           | 6    | 504           | 6    |                  |
| LOP_INSERT_ROWS       | LCX_INDEX_LEAF     | sys.syssingleobjrefs.nc1  | 92            | 1    |               |      | -92              |
| LOP_INSERT_ROWS       | LCX_TEXT_MIX       | Unknown Alloc Unit        | 5112          | 71   | 5112          | 71   |                  |
| LOP_MARK_SAVEPOINT    | LCX_NULL           |                           | 508           | 8    | 508           | 8    |                  |
| LOP_MODIFY_COLUMNS    | LCX_CLUSTERED      | Unknown Alloc Unit        | 1560          | 10   | 1560          | 10   |                  |
| LOP_MODIFY_HEADER     | LCX_HEAP           | Unknown Alloc Unit        | 3780          | 45   | 3780          | 45   |                  |
| LOP_MODIFY_ROW        | LCX_CLUSTERED      | sys.syscolpars.clst       | 384           | 4    | 384           | 4    |                  |
| LOP_MODIFY_ROW        | LCX_CLUSTERED      | sys.sysidxstats.clst      | 100           | 1    | 100           | 1    |                  |
| LOP_MODIFY_ROW        | LCX_CLUSTERED      | sys.sysrowsets.clust      | 92            | 1    | 92            | 1    |                  |
| LOP_MODIFY_ROW        | LCX_CLUSTERED      | sys.sysschobjs.clst       | 1144          | 13   | 1144          | 13   |                  |
| LOP_MODIFY_ROW        | LCX_IAM            | Unknown Alloc Unit        | 4224          | 48   | 4224          | 48   |                  |
| LOP_MODIFY_ROW        | LCX_PFS            | Unknown Alloc Unit        | 13632         | 169  | 13632         | 169  |                  |
| LOP_MODIFY_ROW        | LCX_TEXT_MIX       | Unknown Alloc Unit        | 108640        | 120  | 108640        | 120  |                  |
| LOP_ROOT_CHANGE       | LCX_CLUSTERED      | sys.sysallocunits.clust   | 960           | 10   | 960           | 10   |                  |
| LOP_SET_BITS          | LCX_GAM            | Unknown Alloc Unit        | 1200          | 20   | 1200          | 20   |                  |
| LOP_SET_BITS          | LCX_IAM            | Unknown Alloc Unit        | 1080          | 18   | 1080          | 18   |                  |
| LOP_SET_BITS          | LCX_SGAM           | Unknown Alloc Unit        | 120           | 2    | 120           | 2    |                  |
| LOP_SHRINK_NOOP       | LCX_NULL           |                           |               |      | 32            | 1    | 32               |
+-----------------------+--------------------+---------------------------+---------------+------+---------------+------+------------------+
| Total                 |                    |                           | 410144        | 1095 | 411232        | 1092 | 1088             |
+-----------------------+--------------------+---------------------------+---------------+------+---------------+------+------------------+
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+1 Just out of curiosity (and to be a little pedantic). The question is/was quite old (Aug 2008), so it was about SQL 2005. Now we are in 2011 (end of) and the latest SQL is 2008 R2 plus the Denali beta. What version have you used? –  xanatos Nov 20 '11 at 21:00
1  
@xanatos - 2008. On 2005 table variables would actually be at a disadvantage as INSERT ... SELECT wasn't minimally logged and you can't SELECT INTO ... a table variable. –  Martin Smith Nov 20 '11 at 21:02
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@wcm - actually to nit pick the Table Variable isn't Ram only - it can be partially stored on disk.

A temp table can have indexes, whereas a table variable can only have a primary index. If speed is an issue Table variables can be faster, but obviously if there are a lot of records, or the need to search the temp table of a clustered index, then a Temp Table would be better.

Good background article

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1  
Good background article +1. I'll be deleting my answer since modifying it wouldn't leave much and there are so many good answers already –  wcm Oct 19 '10 at 13:06
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In which scenarios does one out-perform the other?

For smaller tables (less than 1000 rows) use a temp variable, otherwise use a temp table.

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10  
Any supporting data? This isn't very helpful just as an assertion on its own. –  Michael Myers Apr 10 '12 at 22:39
3  
Microsoft recommends 100 rows limit: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms175010.aspx (see Best Practices section). –  Artemix Mar 14 '13 at 10:01
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For all of you who believe the myth that temp variables are in memory only

First, the table variable is NOT necessarily memory resident. Under memory pressure, the pages belonging to a table variable can be pushed out to tempdb.

Read the article here: TempDB:: Table variable vs local temporary table

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1  
Can you edit your answers into a single answer addressing the two points? –  Joshua Drake Feb 1 '13 at 13:52
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The other main difference is that table variables don't have column statistics, where as temp tables do. This means that the query optimiser doesn't know how many rows are in the table variable (it guesses 1), which can lead to highly non-optimal plans been generated if the table variable actually has a large number of rows.

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The rows column in sys.partitions is maintained for table variables so it does actually know how many rows are in the table. This can be seen by using OPTION (RECOMPILE). But the lack of column stats means it can't estimate specific column predicates. –  Martin Smith Nov 20 '11 at 18:05
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  1. Temp table: A Temp table is easy to create and back up data.

    Table variable: But the table variable involves the effort when we usually create the normal tables.

  2. Temp table: Temp table result can be used by multiple users.

    Table variable: But the table variable can be used by the current user only. 

  3. Temp table: Temp table will be stored in the tempdb. It will make network traffic. When we have large data in the temp table then it has to work across the database. A Performance issue will exist.

    Table variable: But a table variable will store in the physical memory for some of the data, then later when the size increases it will be moved to the tempdb.

  4. Temp table: Temp table can do all the DDL operations. It allows creating the indexes, dropping, altering, etc..,

    Table variable: Whereas table variable won't allow doing the DDL operations. But the table variable allows us to create the clustered index only.

  5. Temp table: Temp table can be used for the current session or global. So that a multiple user session can utilize the results in the table.

    Table variable: But the table variable can be used up to that program. (Stored procedure)

  6. Temp table: Temp variable cannot use the transactions. When we do the DML operations with the temp table then it can be rollback or commit the transactions.

    Table variable: But we cannot do it for table variable.

  7. Temp table: Functions cannot use the temp variable. More over we cannot do the DML operation in the functions .

    Table variable: But the function allows us to use the table variable. But using the table variable we can do that.

  8. Temp table: The stored procedure will do the recompilation (can't use same execution plan) when we use the temp variable for every sub sequent calls.

    Table variable: Whereas the table variable won't do like that.

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Consider also that you can often replace both with derived tables which may be faster as well. As with all performance tuning, though, only actual tests against your actual data can tell you the best approach for your particular query.

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Another difference:

A table var can only be accessed from statements within the procedure that creates it, not from other procedures called by that procedure or nested dynamic SQL (via exec or sp_executesql).

A temp table's scope, on the other hand, includes code in called procedures and nested dynamic SQL.

If the table created by your procedure must be accessible from other called procedures or dynamic SQL, you must use a temp table. This can be very handy in complex situations.

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protected by Will Nov 24 '10 at 14:09

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