Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Tim Sweeney of Epic MegaGames is the lead developer for Unreal and a programming language geek. Many years ago posted the following screen shot to VoodooExtreme:

Tim Sweeney's screenshot

As a C++ programmer and Sweeney fan, I was captivated by this. It shows generic C++ code that implements some kind of scripting language where that language itself seems to be generic in the sense that it can define its own grammar.

Mr. Sweeney never explained himself. :-)

It's rare to see this level of template programming, but you do see it from time to time when people want to push the compiler to generate great code or because they want to create generic code (for example, Modern C++ Design).

Tim seems to be using it to create a grammar in Parser.cpp - you can see what look like prioritized binary operators. If that is the case, then why does Test.ae look like it's also defining a grammar?

Obviously this is a puzzle that needs to be solved. Victory goes to the answer with a working version of this code, or the most plausible explanation, or to Tim Sweeney himself if he posts an answer. :-)

share|improve this question
9  
I think the theme/colors are shocking. Otherwise, interesting question. –  ChristopheD May 7 '10 at 21:35
1  
@ChristopheD Haha yeah. I was such a fan at the time though that I changed my desktop to be the same - it must have been how real programmers worked! I always wondered if he was just playing a joke. And the picture I posted is cropped, here is the full thing: praeclarum.org/so/sweeney-full.png –  Frank Krueger May 7 '10 at 21:41
2  
Maybe he was working on a next-generation version of ZZT-OOP... :) en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZZT-oop –  Steve Dennis May 7 '10 at 21:50
2  
You could send him an email message and ask. Why guess? –  Ira Baxter May 7 '10 at 22:00
3  
What was he thinking? Probably What would Jon Skeet do? –  Skizz May 7 '10 at 22:31
show 4 more comments

5 Answers

I asked Mr. Sweeney via email and received this answer:

The C++ code is using template classes I wrote that implement parser combinators. The idea is to start with some basic parsers, such as literals where PLit<'A'> parses a literal character 'A', PAny<> parses any character but fails if at the end of fail, PEof fails unless we're not at the end of the file, etc. And then we combine them into arbitrary trees using combinators like PAnd which parses a then b, and succeeds only if both succeed -- else it fails with the parse point unmoved. And if it succeeds, the result is a struct containing two fields, one for the result of a, and one for the result of b. And so on.

The implementation is messy in C++ for a number of reasons, including that templates don't support arbitrary variadic parameters, and without first-class lambdas we can't easily process the results inline with the parser.

Here are some snippets of the template code, from which you can probably figure out the details of the framework.

// Parses a literal item.
UBOOL LiteralEvaluate (UClass* C,class FParseInBase& In,class FParseOutBase& Out)
{
 FParseInMark M(In);
 NNode* e = In.GetNextSource();
 if (e && e->IsA(C))
 {
  Out.Callback(e);
  return 1;
 }
 M.Restore(In);
 return 0;
}
// Optional item of the specified type.
template <class U> struct Optional
{
 static UBOOL Evaluate (class FParseInBase& In,FParseOutBase& Out)
 {
  U::Evaluate(In,Out);
  return 1;
 }
};
// Ignore items by absorbing them; retains boolean logic but not callback.
template <class T> struct Ignore
{
 static UBOOL Evaluate (class FParseInBase& In,FParseOutBase& Out)
 {
  return T::Evaluate(In,GIgnore);
 }
};
// Zero or more items of the specified type.
template <class T> struct ZeroOrMore
{
 static UBOOL Evaluate (class FParseInBase& In,FParseOutBase& Out)
 {
  while (T::Evaluate(In,Out));
  return 1;
 }
};
// One or more items of the specified type.
template <class T> struct OneOrMore
{
 static UBOOL Evaluate (class FParseInBase& In,FParseOutBase& Out)
 {
  for( INT i=0; T::Evaluate(In,Out); i++ );
  return i>0;
 }
};
// Always fails.
struct RFalse
{
 static UBOOL Evaluate (class FParseInBase& In,FParseOutBase& Out)
 {
  return 0;
 }
};
// Always succeeds.
struct RTrue
{
 static UBOOL Evaluate (class FParseInBase& In,FParseOutBase& Out)
 {
  return 1;
 }
};
// Parses the first matching items of the specified subtypes of T.
template <class A,class B=RFalse,class C=RFalse,class D=RFalse > struct Or
{
 static UBOOL Evaluate (class FParseInBase& In,FParseOutBase& Out)
 {
  return A::Evaluate(In,Out) || B::Evaluate(In,Out) || C::Evaluate(In,Out) || D::Evaluate(In,Out);
 }
};
// Parses all the specified items.
template <class A,class B=RTrue,class C=RTrue,class D=RTrue> struct And
{
 static UBOOL Evaluate (class FParseInBase& In,FParseOutBase& Out)
 {
  FParseInMark Mark(In);
  Conjunction<NNode> Q;
  if( A::Evaluate(In,Q) && B::Evaluate(In,Q) && C::Evaluate(In,Q) && D::Evaluate(In,Q) )
  {
   Q.Forward(Out);
   return 1;
  }
  Mark.Restore(In);
  return 0;
 }
};
// A separated list.
template <class A,class B> class SeparatedList : public Or<And<A,B,SeparatedList>,A> {};
// Integer comparison.
template <INT A,INT B> struct IsAtLeast
{
 static UBOOL Evaluate (class FParseInBase& In,FParseOutBase& Out)
 {
  return A>=B;
 }
};

That Test.ae was an experimental scripting language I was implementing in 1999-2001 -- that color scheme was trendy back then, I swear. :-)

The code shown defines metadata for the language constructs. The language went a long way down the Smalltalk "everything is an object" path, dealing with first-class metaclasses and related issues, but I ultimately abandoned it when I became familiar with advanced type systems work in Haskell, Cayenne, Coq, and other languages.

Nowadays -

I'm not a fan of implementing parsers or compilers in C++, since the code tends to be bloated by 70-80% compared to a similar implementation in a modern functional language like Haskell. Read up on Haskell parser combinators for more detail -- the resulting simplicity and directness is exemplary and it's done in a rigorous, type-safe way.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh wow, I'm blown away. I didn't know Sweeney was a language geek, but here he is doing parser combinators in 1999 and now recommending Haskell for writing compilers. My new hero! –  CodexArcanum Jan 2 '13 at 18:26
add comment

Can't tell for sure, but the C++ code kinda sorta looks like Spirit, a C++ parser generator that makes extensive use of templates. Test.ae looks like it's metaprogramming (defining language details in the language itself), which is harder to do in C++ (templates are a start, but is error prone and ugly) than it would be in some other target language (e.g., UnrealScript, which is what I assume test.ae is written in).

So - it looks like Parser.cpp defines the base grammar for UnrealScript (using Spirit), and Test.ae is defining extensions to UnrealScript.

share|improve this answer
    
While both Spirit and this code use templates, they don't appear to be the same library. Or am I missing something? It just doesn't look like this is how Spirit resolves operator precedence. And no your assumption is wrong. These AE files are a long ways from UnrealScript. At this time, Tim was talking publicly about replacing UnrealScript's compiler, but this was definitely a break from that syntax. –  Frank Krueger May 7 '10 at 22:03
    
I know nothing about UnrealScript, or Spirit, for that matter; there are several template-based parser generators for C++ in the style of Spirit. That being said, however, I believe that I illustrated the general idea of metaprogramming correctly; Ira's answer that using pure C++ templates can be slow to compile and generate very unreadable error messages is another reason to define the base language in C++ and then define the advanced language in terms of the base language. This technique is also known as 'bootstrapping'. –  Eric Brown May 10 '10 at 18:02
add comment

I don't know what Sweeney did, and I'll assume that other answers about using Spirit are in, uh, the right spirit. I have no experience with Spirit templates, but my understanding is that if you define a complex grammar with it, it becomes pretty difficult to handle (as well as slow to compile). Other people's actual experience should be used to guage the truth of this.

There are other ways to implement extensions to C++, e.g., using program transformations and extendible grammars. See this SO answer on augmenting the C++ grammar itself with arbitrary extensions, where very complex extensions are possible and were in fact used.

Template metaprogramming generates interesting code where the templates are specifically invoked. Using program transformations you can generate arbitrarily interesting code at any point in the program, e.g, its as if the "templates" (additional syntax) changes the semantics any way you think is useful.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The screenshot is obviously from an MSVC 6.0 or earlier time frame, which did not really appreciate complex templates (and certainly did not support partial template specialization). I've not used spirit. From these screenshots, it's impossible to tell what Sweeney is truly doing beyond defining what looks to be a DSL in Test.ae.

The only full C++ statements you can see are in Parser.cpp - and they don't tell you much of anything except he's declaring 3 types. You really can't tell much of anything - too much is obscured by the 'Test.ae' window.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It is similar to YARD/Biscuit library

http://p-stade.sourceforge.net/biscuit/index.html

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.