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After two years of C#, I'm now back to VB.net because of my current job. In C#, I can do a short hand testing for null or false value on a string variable like this:

if(!String.IsNullOrEmpty(blah))
{
   ...code goes here
}

however I'm a little confused about how to do this in VB.net.

if Not String.IsNullOrEmpty(blah) then
   ...code goes here
end if

Does the above statement mean if the string is not null or empty? Is the Not keyword operate like the C#'s ! operator?

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6 Answers 6

Yes they are the same

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4  
They act the same way, but they're definitely not the same. 'Not' in VB is overloaded to represent both logical negation and bitwise complement. –  RoadWarrior Nov 10 '08 at 21:56
    
Thanks, I did not know that. I have not used bitwise complement operators in vb.net or C# –  Ruben Nov 10 '08 at 22:22

In the context you show, the VB Not keyword is indeed the equivalent of the C# ! operator. But note that the VB Not keyword is actually overloaded to represent 2 C# equivalents:

  • logical negation: !
  • bitwise complement: ~

For example, the following 2 lines are equivalent:

C#: useThis &= ~doNotUse; 
VB: useThis = useThis And (Not doNotUse)
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Not is exactly like ! (in the context of Boolean. See RoadWarrior's remark for its semantics as one's complement in bit arithmetic). There's a special case in combination with the Is operator to test for reference equality:

If Not x Is Nothing Then ' … '
' is the same as '
If x IsNot Nothing Then ' … '

is equivalent to C#'s

if (x != null) // or, rather, to be precise:
if (object.ReferenceEquals(x, null))

Here, usage of IsNot is preferred. Unfortunately, it doesn't work for TypeOf tests.

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Seconded. They work identically. Both reverse the logical meaning of the expression following the !/not operator.

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They act in the same way, but they're definitely not the same. 'Not' in VB is overloaded to represent both logical negation and bitwise complement. –  RoadWarrior Nov 10 '08 at 21:57

c# : boolean example1 = false;

 boolean example2 = !example1;

vb.net: dim example1 as boolean = False

    dim example2 as boolean = Not example1
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They work identically until you reference C or C++ code.

For example doing NOT on the result of a Win32 API function, might lead to incorrect result, since true in C == 1, and a bitwise NOT on 1 does not equal false.

As 1 is        00000000001
Bitwise Not    11111111110
While false is 00000000000

However in VB it works just fine, as in VB true == -1

As -1 is       11111111111
Bitwise Not    00000000000
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