Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

exhaustive:
- all keys in the dictionary, even if the keys are in a nested dictionary that is a value to a previous-level dictionary key.

sorted:
- this is to ensure the keys are always returned in the same order

The nesting is arbitrarily deep. A non-recursive algorithm is preferred.

level1 = {
    'a'         : 'aaaa',
    'level2_1'  : {'b': 'bbbbb', 'level3': {'c': 'cccc', 'd': 'dddddd'}  },
    'level2_2'  : { 'z': 'zzzzzzz' }
}

Note: dictionary values can include lists (which can have dictionaries as elements), e.g.

tricky = {'category': [{'content': 'aaaaa'}, {'content': 'bbbbbb'}]}

share|improve this question
2  
What have you tried so far? Do you know how to get a sorted list of keys for a dictionary one level deep? –  Greg Hewgill May 8 '10 at 1:57

5 Answers 5

def _auxallkeys(aset, adict):
  aset.update(adict)
  for d in adict.itervalues():
    if isinstance(d, dict):
       _auxallkeys(aset, d)

def allkeys(adict):
  aset = set()
  _auxallkeys(aset, adict)
  return sorted(aset)

is the obvious (recursive) solution. To eliminate recursion:

def allkeys(adict):
  aset = set()
  pending = [adict]
  while pending:
    d = pending.pop()
    aset.update(d)
    for dd in d.itervalues():
      if isinstance(dd, dict):
         pending.append(dd)
  return sorted(aset)

since the order of processing of the various nested dicts does not matter for this purpose.

Edit: the OP comments whining that it doesn't work if a dict is not nested, but rather in a list (and I replied that it could also be in a tuple, an object with attributes per-instance or per-class [maybe a base class thereof], a shelf, and many other ways to hide dicts around the house;-). If the OP will deign to define precisely what he means by "nested" (obviously not the same meaning as ordinary mortals apply to the word in question), it will probably be easier to help him. Meanwhile, here's a version that covers lists (and tuples, but not generators, instances of many itertools classes, shelves, etc, etc);

def allkeys(adict):
  aset = set()
  pending = [adict]
  pendlis = []

  def do_seq(seq):
    for dd in seq:
      if isinstance(dd, dict):
        pending.append(dd)
      elif isinstance(dd, (list, tuple)):
        pendlis.append(dd)

  while pending or pendlis:
    while pending:
      d = pending.pop()
      aset.update(d)
      do_seq(d.itervalues())
    while pendlis:
      l = pendlis.pop()
      do_seq(l)

  return sorted(aset)
share|improve this answer
    
This mostly works. It fails when a value is a list of dictionaries. tricky = {'category': [{'content': 'aaaaa'}, {'content': 'bbbbbb'}]} –  saidimu May 8 '10 at 2:28
1  
@saidimu, also when the dict is otherwise hidden, e.g. as an attribute value for an arbitrary object, an item in a tuple, a value in a shelve.shelf instance, and so forth -- you'd better define "nested" more precisely by editing your question if you hope anybody understands what you mean by "nested" (which is not the normal meaning of this term;-). –  Alex Martelli May 8 '10 at 2:38
1  
Regarding the first solution: if you store the keys in a set, duplicate keys will appear only once, which might not be ok. –  Cristian Ciupitu May 8 '10 at 3:56
    
@Cristian, obvious for all solutions: if you want duplicates, which is unusual but not unheard of, obviously s/set/list/ and s/update/extend -- as is pretty trivial and obvious. –  Alex Martelli May 8 '10 at 4:35

A non-recursive method isn't obvious to me right now. The following works on your original example. Edit: It will now handle dicts within a list within a dict, at least the one within the tricky example cited in the comment to Alex Martelli's answer.

#!/usr/bin/env python
import types

def get_key_list(the_dict, key_list):
    for k, v in (the_dict.iteritems()):
        key_list.append(k)
        if type(v) is types.DictType:
            get_key_list(v, key_list)
        if type(v) is types.ListType:
            for lv in v:
                if type(lv) is types.DictType:
                    get_key_list(lv, key_list)
    return

level1 = {
    'a'         : 'aaaa',
    'level2_1'  : {'b': 'bbbbb', 'level3': {'c': 'cccc', 'd': 'dddddd'}  },
    'level2_2'  : { 'z': 'zzzzzzz' }
}
tricky = {'category': [{'content': 'aaaaa'}, {'content': 'bbbbbb'}]}

key_list = []
get_key_list(level1, key_list)
key_list.sort()
print key_list

key_list = []
get_key_list(tricky, key_list)
key_list.sort()
print key_list

Output:

['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'level2_1', 'level2_2', 'level3', 'z']
['category', 'content', 'content']

share|improve this answer

Here's a non-recursive solution which processes generators as well as lists, tuples and dicts and adds all successive keys if a key appears more than once:

def get_iterator(i):
    if hasattr(i, 'next'):
        # already an iterator - use it as-is!
        return i
    elif hasattr(i, '__iter__') and not isinstance(i, basestring):
        # an iterable type that isn't a string
        return iter(i)
    else: 
        # Can't iterate most other types!
        return None

def get_dict_keys(D):
    LRtn = []
    L = [(D, get_iterator(D))]
    while 1:
        if not L: break
        cur, _iter = L[-1]

        if _iter:
            # Get the next item
            try: 
                i = _iter.next()
            except StopIteration:
                del L[-1]
                continue

        if isinstance(cur, dict): 
            # Process a dict and all subitems
            LRtn.append(i)

            _iter = get_iterator(cur[i])
            if _iter: L.append((cur[i], _iter))
        else:
            # Process generators, lists, tuples and all subitems
            _iter = get_iterator(i)
            if _iter: L.append((i, _iter))

    # Sort and return
    LRtn.sort()
    return LRtn

D = {
    'a'         : 'aaaa',
    'level2_1'  : {'b': 'bbbbb', 'level3': {'c': 'cccc', 'd': 'dddddd', 'e': 134, 'f': [{'blah': 553}]}  },
    'level2_2'  : { 'z': 'zzzzzzz' },
    'blah2': iter([{'blah3': None}]),
}

print get_dict_keys(D)

EDIT: Increased the speed a bit and made the code shorter.

share|improve this answer

I also prefer a recursive approach...

#!/usr/bin/env python

def extract_all_keys(structure):
    try:
        list_of_keys = structure.keys()
        for value in structure.values():
            add_all_keys_in_value_to_list(value, list_of_keys)
    except AttributeError:
        list_of_keys = []
    return list_of_keys.sort()


def add_all_keys_in_value_to_list(value, list_of_keys):
    if isinstance(value, dict):
        list_of_keys += extract_all_keys(value)
    elif isinstance(value, (list, tuple)):
        for element in value:
            list_of_keys += extract_all_keys(element)


import unittest

class TestKeys(unittest.TestCase):

    def given_a_structure_of(self, structure):
        self.structure = structure


    def when_keys_are_extracted(self):
        self.list_of_keys = extract_all_keys(self.structure)


    def testEmptyDict(self):
        self.given_a_structure_of({})
        self.when_keys_are_extracted()
        self.assertEquals(self.list_of_keys, [])


    def testOneElement(self):
        self.given_a_structure_of({'a': 'aaaa'})
        self.when_keys_are_extracted()
        self.assertEquals(self.list_of_keys, ['a'])


    def testTwoElementsSorted(self):
        self.given_a_structure_of({
            'z': 'zzzz',
            'a': 'aaaa',
            })
        self.when_keys_are_extracted()
        self.assertEquals(self.list_of_keys, ['a', 'z'])


    def testNestedElements(self):
        self.given_a_structure_of({
            'a': {'aaaa': 'A',},
            'b': {'bbbb': 'B',},
            })
        self.when_keys_are_extracted()
        self.assertEquals(self.list_of_keys, ['a', 'aaaa', 'b', 'bbbb'])


    def testDoublyNestedElements(self):
        self.given_a_structure_of({
            'level2': {'aaaa': 'A',
                'level3': {'bbbb': 'B'}
                }
            })
        self.when_keys_are_extracted()
        self.assertEquals(self.list_of_keys, ['aaaa', 'bbbb', 'level2', 'level3'])


    def testNestedExampleOnStackOverflow(self):
        level1 = {
                'a'         : 'aaaa',
                'level2_1'  : {'b': 'bbbbb', 'level3': {'c': 'cccc', 'd': 'dddddd'}  },
                'level2_2'  : { 'z': 'zzzzzzz' }
                }
        self.given_a_structure_of(level1)
        self.when_keys_are_extracted()
        self.assertEquals(self.list_of_keys, ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'level2_1', 'level2_2', 'level3', 'z'])


    def testListExampleOnStackOverflow(self):
        tricky = {'category': [{'content': 'aaaaa'}, {'content': 'bbbbbb'}]}
        self.given_a_structure_of(tricky)
        self.when_keys_are_extracted()
        self.assertEquals(self.list_of_keys, ['category', 'content', 'content'])


    def testTuplesTreatedLikeLists(self):
        tricky_tuple = {'category': ({'content': 'aaaaa'}, {'content': 'bbbbbb'})}
        self.given_a_structure_of(tricky_tuple)
        self.when_keys_are_extracted()
        self.assertEquals(self.list_of_keys, ['category', 'content', 'content'])


    def testCanHandleString(self):
        self.given_a_structure_of('keys')
        self.when_keys_are_extracted()
        self.assertEquals(self.list_of_keys, [])

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()
share|improve this answer

I think it is better to use a recursive method. My code is in the following.

level1 = {
    'a'         : 'aaaa',
    'level2_1'  : {'b': 'bbbbb', 'level3': {'c': 'cccc', 'd': 'dddddd'}  },
    'level2_2'  : { 'z': 'zzzzzzz' }
}

all_keys=[]       # a global list to store all the keys in level1

def depth ( dict ):
    for k in dict:
        if type(dict[k]) == type(dict):     #judge the type of elements in dictionary  
            depth(dict[k])                  # recursive 
        else:
            all_keys.append(k)

depth(level1)

print all_keys
share|improve this answer
5  
What a positively horrible idea, to name depth's argument in a way to hide the built-in dict name! –  Alex Martelli May 8 '10 at 2:36
    
This misses some keys: 'level2_1' and 'level2_2'. It will also fail when a value is a list of dictionaries, e.g. tricky = {'category': [{'content': 'aaaaa'}, {'content': 'bbbbbb'}]} –  saidimu May 8 '10 at 2:38
3  
@Alex Martelli, er... It is a horrible idea to use dict as parameter name. I learn that dict is a default built-in name. Thanks. –  chnet May 8 '10 at 13:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.