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I have a javascript hash table, like so:

var things = [ ];
things["hello"] = {"name" : "zzz I fell asleep", "number" : 7};
things["one"] = {"name" : "something", "number" : 18};
things["two"] = {"name" : "another thing", "number" : -2};

I want to sort these into order by name, so if I iterate through the hash table it will go in order

another thing
something
zzz I fell asleep

I tried doing this:

function compareThings(thing1, thing2) {
    var name1 = thing1["name"].toLowerCase();
    var name2 = thing2["name"].toLowerCase();
    if (name1 < name2) {
        return -1;
        }
    if (name1 > name2) {
        return 1;
        }
    return 0;
}

things.sort(compareThings);

But it doesn't seem to work.

Edit: it occurs to me that perhaps a sorted hash table is an oxymoron. If so, what's the best way to get access to a sorted list of the things here?

share|improve this question
    
You are not having a hastable (aka object) nor a proper array. If you wat to have an object you should initialize it with {} not with []. If you initialize with [] you have an Array, but then do not add to it by means of a["one"] and a["two"] but by a.push(...);. Only after you know what data structure you want, can you bother with sorting. (BTW: foo["bar"] is the same as foo.bar, use the second, it does not clog the code with string literals and lots of square brackets) –  herby Nov 17 '11 at 12:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you want to iterate through a hash table in JavaScript in order, make an array, populate it with the hash keys, and then sort it.

<html>
<body>
<pre>
  <script>
    var things = new Object ();
    things["hello"] = {"name" : "zzz I fell asleep", "number" : 7};
    things["one"] = {"name" : "something", "number" : 18};
    things["two"] = {"name" : "another thing", "number" : -2};
    var keys = [];
    for (var key in things) {
      if (things.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
        keys.push(key);
      }
    }
    keys.sort ();
    for (i in keys) {
      var key = keys[i];
      var value = things[key];
      document.write (key +"="+value+"\n");
    }
  </script>
</pre>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
2  
Just a note, the order of iteration of the for...in statement can be arbitrary, there is nothing described in the ECMAScript specification about the order of enumeration of the properties, it is implementation dependent... no guarantees, use with care... –  CMS May 8 '10 at 4:46
    
@CMS: So I should use for (var i = 0; i < keys.length; i++) to be strictly correct? –  user181548 May 8 '10 at 5:47
1  
@Kinopiko, exactly, give a look to the following articles for more info: [ 1 ](andrewdupont.net/2006/05/18/…) and [ 2 ](dhtmlkitchen.com/?category=/JavaScript/&date=2007/10/21/…). –  CMS May 8 '10 at 7:10
    
Thanks for the links. –  user181548 May 8 '10 at 9:00
    
You can also build your keys array using Object.keys(things). It's also a good practice to store the array length before the for loop's comparison step, so @CMS's for loop from above could be written like for (var i = 0, l = keys.length; i < l; i++). This avoids repeatedly indexing into the keys.length property for a value that doesn't change. –  Michael Trotter Apr 14 at 16:37

I developed a function that sorts a hash table by the key, no matter if the value is a number or a string. It keeps the key if the table is an associated table.

function sortHashTableByKey(hash, key_order, remove_key)
{
    var tmp = [],
        end = [],
        f_order = null;
    remove_key = remove_key || false;
    for (var key in hash)
    {
        if (hash.hasOwnProperty(key))
        {
            tmp.push(hash[key][key_order]);
        }
    }
    if (hash && hash[0] && typeof(hash[0][key_order]) === 'number')
    {
        f_order = function (a, b) { return a - b; };
    }
    tmp.sort(f_order);
    function getHash(hash, value)
    {
        for (k in hash)
        {
            if (hash[k] && hash[k][key_order] === value)
            {
                return { key : k, hash : hash[k] };
            }
        }
    }
    for (var i = 0, l = tmp.length; i < l; i++)
    {
        tmp[i] = getHash(hash, tmp[i]);
        if (remove_key)
        {
            delete tmp[i].hash[key_order];
        }
        if (!hash.length)
        {
            end[tmp[i].key] = tmp[i].hash;
        }
        else
        {
            end.push(tmp[i].hash);
        }
    }
    return end;
}

This will do :

var things = new Object ();
things["hello"] = {"name" : "zzz I fell asleep", "number" : 7};
things["one"] = {"name" : "something", "number" : 18};
things["two"] = {"name" : "another thing", "number" : -2};

things = sortHashTableByKey(things, 'name');

/*
[
  two: { name: 'another thing', number: -2 },
  one: { name: 'something', number: 18 },
  hello: { name: 'zzz I fell asleep', number: 7 }
]
*/
share|improve this answer
    
I plan on being this, thanks. –  Hayk Saakian Oct 4 '12 at 8:52
    
This is exactly the function I need, thanks. –  analysiser Aug 13 '13 at 20:21

your parameters are thing1 and thing2, but you're referencing some variables called asp1 and asp2, which, as far as I can tell from the source you've provided, do not exist.

Also, I think what you're looking for is an associative array, which is not instantiated with the [] syntax. See here for more info:

http://www.quirksmode.org/js/associative.html

EDIT: I don't think there's an array in Javascript that'll let you do what you want.

You can have plain old array, which will let you do the custom sorting or you can have an associative array, which will let you have the named values.

With the regular array, you can obviously iterate through the indexes.

With the associative array, you can iterate through the names by doing for (var key in myArray)

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, typo.... –  Colen May 8 '10 at 3:40
1  
Be careful with that for...in syntax. It'll loop over all the properties the object in question has, which includes things other than array keys. –  Syntactic May 8 '10 at 4:04
    
^^ This is true, but shouldn't be an issue as long as it doesn't inherit from anything. –  Daniel Schaffer May 8 '10 at 21:01

My solution

things.sort(function(a,b){return a.name - b.name;});
share|improve this answer
2  
OP is using the array things incorrectly so this would not help. –  Felix Kling Aug 8 '11 at 15:37
    
This answer solved my problem. Thanks! –  falsarella Apr 8 '13 at 17:05

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