Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose you run the application 'app' by typing 'app', rather than its absolute path. Due to your $PATH variable, what actually runs is /foo/bar/app. From inside app I'd like to determine /foo/bar/app. argv[0] is just 'app', so that doesn't help.

I know in Linux I can get look at the

/proc/self/exe

softlink, but that doesn't work on other *nix, specifically OS X. Is there a more portable way to determine the dir in which the app lives?

share|improve this question
    
I already removed my getcwd() "answer", I didn't read careful enough, pardon :) –  LukeN May 8 '10 at 16:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I ended up mimicking the 'which' program and looking at each dir in $PATH to see if $dir/app is executable:

if (strchr(progname, '/') == NULL) {
    std::string pathStr = getenv("PATH");
    std::string testDir;
    pathStr += ":";             // add a trailing ':' to make search easier
    size_t pos = 0;
    bool found = false;

    while (!found && ((pos = pathStr.find(":")) != std::string::npos)) {
      testDir = pathStr.substr(0, pos);
      testPath = testDir + "/" + progname;
      pathStr = pathStr.substr(pos + 1, pathStr.size() - pos + 1);
      if (access(testPath.c_str(), X_OK) == 0)
        found = true;
    }
    if (found)
      dir = testDir.c_str();
  }
share|improve this answer

I'm not sure that there is any good portable way to do this.

On OS X, you can use _NSGetExecutablePath() (then apply realpath() to the result if you like).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That's really helpful, as I hadn't tackled OS X yet. –  Dave Wade-Stein May 8 '10 at 17:24
    
This does AFAIK only work if there is an Application bundle. I have not yet found a way to get the path for a command line executable. But i haven't tried it hard enough i guess. –  Lothar May 8 '10 at 18:04
    
Ah, I wondered about that. This is a command-line app, not an Application bundle. –  Dave Wade-Stein May 8 '10 at 18:42
    
Works for me with a command line app run from a shell on OS X 10.4 (sorry, I don't have anything more recent to hand right now)... –  Matthew Slattery May 8 '10 at 20:02

Don't use path, use /proc. Here is some code i've written

const char* eif_ft__binary_file()
{
#ifdef OS_WINDOWS
  wchar_t* p = (wchar_t*)malloc(282 * sizeof(wchar_t));
  GetModuleFileNameW(NULL, p, 280);
  char* res = transform__utf16_to_utf8(p,-1,NULL);
  free(p);
  return res;
#elif OS_LINUX
  char* path = (char*)malloc(512);
  int res = readlink("/proc/self/exe", path, 510);
  if (res == -1) { free(path); return ""; }
  path[res]=0;
  TEMP_STRING_1 = path;
  free(path);
  return TEMP_STRING_1.text();
#elif OS_SOLARIS
  char* path = (char*)malloc(512);
  int res = readlink("/proc/self/path/a.out", path, 510);
  if (res == -1) { free(path); return ""; }
  path[res]=0;
  TEMP_STRING_1 = path;
  free(path);
  return TEMP_STRING_1.text();
#elif OS_FREEBSD
  char* path = (char*)malloc(512);
  int res = readlink("/proc/curproc/file", path, 510);
  if (res == -1) { free(path); return ""; }
  path[res]=0;
  TEMP_STRING_1 = path;
  free(path);
  return TEMP_STRING_1.text();
#else
  TEMP_STRING_1 = "";
  return TEMP_STRING_1.text();
#endif
}

TEMP_STRING ist just a generic macro for a String class.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't work on OS X, for example. I was hoping for a more generic answer, but if none exists, I'll do something like the above, thanks. –  Dave Wade-Stein May 8 '10 at 16:10
    
Thanks for /proc/self...I didn't realize that I didn't have to use getpid() to determine the current proc and could use 'self' instead. –  Dave Wade-Stein May 8 '10 at 16:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.