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What's your favorite implementation of producing the Fibonacci sequence? Best, most creative, most clever, fastest, smallest, written in weirdest language, etc., etc.

For those not familiar with this staple of programming exam question / interview question, check this out:

Fibonacci Sequence at Wikipedia

The question would be, write a simple program which will spit out the first n numbers of the Fibonacci sequence.

So, if n == 12, we produce:

0 1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 34 55 89 144

Your implementation becomes more interesting when you set n to larger values. How long does it take your implementation to return a 25 number sequence? How about 100?

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locked by Bill the Lizard Apr 5 '12 at 12:22

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I took the Python post down, since I realized that it didn't produce the list, just the end result, and I don't have time to modify it. –  Lance Roberts Nov 11 '08 at 0:30
    
if n==12. it should show 0 1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 34 55 89 is it? –  THEn Jul 20 '10 at 0:08
1  
cw maybe, anyone? –  knittl Sep 26 '10 at 8:13

29 Answers 29

static int[] fibs = { 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, 233, 377, 610, 987, 1597,
	2584, 4181, 6765, 10946, 17711, 28657, 46368, 75025, 121393, 196418, 317811, 514229,
	832040, 1346269, 2178309, 3524578, 5702887, 9227465, 14930352, 24157817, 39088169,
	63245986, 102334155, 165580141, 267914296, 433494437, 701408733, 1134903170, 1836311903, };

static int fib(int n) {
    return fibs[n];
}
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3  
The fastest implementation I have seen yet! –  Elijah Nov 11 '08 at 1:00
3  
That's what I call memoization. –  Steve Jessop Nov 11 '08 at 1:07
    
Haha! we somewhat cheated in a programming contest and did that, we had a huuuuuge copy pasta of pre generated code for a giant array....it helped gain some speed for sure :) –  Deinumite Nov 11 '08 at 18:35
    
+1. And if n is beyond the range, you may want to actually calculate it. But point taken. –  Ion Todirel May 10 '10 at 23:54

This is my favourite implementation of the fibonacci sequence:

Sunflower

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4  
+1 love this answer –  Metz Jul 17 '10 at 13:20
    
This isn't exactly what I was looking for, but this is the best answer so far. –  Tad Donaghe Jul 19 '10 at 15:01
    
It might be an example of "Fibonacci fakery" –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 19 '12 at 0:05

You can't beat Haskell for this. The simple solution is very close the mathematical defintion:

fibonacci 0     = 0
fibonacci 1     = 1
fibonacci n + 2 = fibonacci (n) + fibonacci (n + 1)

Or, for linear performance, you can take advantage of laziness and infinite lists:

fibonacci = numbers
    where numbers = 0 : 1 : zipWith (+) numbers (tail numbers)
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The first solution is not valid in Haskell 2010 due to the removal of n+k patterns. –  Amuck Dec 30 '09 at 18:20
    
fibs = 0 : (scanl (+) 1 fibs) –  Benson Jan 24 '11 at 22:03

How 'bout meta-programming?

template<int N> struct fibonacci
{
    static const int value = fibonacci<N - 1>::value + fibonacci<N - 2>::value;
};

template<> struct fibonacci<1>
{
    static const int value = 1;
};

template<> struct fibonacci<0>
{
    static const int value = 0;
};


cout << fibonacci<128>::value;
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+1 for quirk factor :) –  Jim Burger Nov 11 '08 at 0:37
    
Ow. you make my brain hurt. :) –  Herms Nov 11 '08 at 18:47
    
Why was this just down-voted? –  Joel Coehoorn May 31 '09 at 23:26
    
So... where is the output of the values? –  PhiLho Dec 18 '09 at 20:32
    
+1 for faster runtime than precomputed array :) –  jv42 Feb 17 '11 at 13:49

Ah la Duff's device

unsigned long fib(unsigned long i)
{
  int a = 1, b = 1, c = 1;
  switch(i%3)
    while(i > 3)
    {
       i-=3;
               b = a + c;  printf("%lu\n", b);
       case 2: a = b + c;  printf("%lu\n", a);
       case 1: c = a + b;  printf("%lu\n", c);
       case 0:
    }
  return c;
}
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Esoteric! And surprisingly fast.

>++++++++++>+>+[
    [+++++[>++++++++<-]>.<++++++[>--------<-]+<<<]>.>>[
        [-]<[>+<-]>>[<<+>+>-]<[>+<-[>+<-[>+<-[>+<-[>+<-[>+<-
            [>+<-[>+<-[>+<-[>[-]>+>+<<<-[>+<-]]]]]]]]]]]+>>>
    ]<<<
]

// This program doesn't terminate; you will have to kill it.
// Daniel B Cristofani (cristofdathevanetdotcom)
// http://www.hevanet.com/cristofd/brainfuck/
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2  
This is more of an art project than it is a code project. I like it. –  Sneakyness Aug 14 '09 at 8:52

Python with memoization:

class memoize:
  # class as decorator
  def __init__(self, function):
    self.function = function
    self.memoized = {}

  def __call__(self, *args):
    try:
      return self.memoized[args]
    except KeyError:
      self.memoized[args] = self.function(*args)
      return self.memoized[args]

@memoize
def fibonacci_memoized(n):
  if n in (0, 1): return n
  return fibonacci_memoized(n - 1) + fibonacci_memoized(n - 2)

Let's compare:

Beginning trial for fibonacci_memoized(30).
fibonacci_memoized(30) = 832040 in 0.000516s.

Beginning trial for fibonacci(30).
fibonacci(30) = 832040 in 1.147118s.

The memoized function is over 2223 times faster.

See http://avinashv.net/2008/04/python-decorators-syntactic-sugar/ for details.

fibonacci(332): 1082459262056433063877940200966638133809015267665311237542082678938909 in 0.009884s

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This is really cool example about memoization, +1, but sorry for screwing up your 1337 karma. –  Luka Rahne Sep 25 '10 at 19:55

Well, here's a Python implementation using a generator. The use of range and zip in the last line is the obligatory obfuscation :p

>>> def fib():
...     x, y = 1, 1
...     while True:
...         yield x
...         x, y = y, x + y
...
>>> [x for _, x in zip(range(12), fib())]
[1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144]
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This is your brain:

int fib(n)
{
  if (n<2) return 1;
  return fib(n-1) + fib(n-2);
}

This is your brain on basic:

int s[999999];
int fib(int i)
{
_1: int t=0; s[t++] = i; s[t++] = 0; s[t] = 0;
_10: if (s[t-2] < 2) { s[t-2] = 1; t-=3; }
_20: if (t < 0) return s[0];
_30: if (s[t] == 1) goto _60;
_40: if (s[t] == 2) goto _70;
_50: s[t++]++; s[t++]=s[t-3]-1; s[t++]=0; s[t]=0; goto _10;
_60: s[t-1]=s[t+1]; s[t++]++; s[t++]=s[t-3]-2; s[t++]=0; s[t]=0; goto _10;
_70: s[t-2]=s[t-1]+s[t+1]; t-=3; goto _20;
}

Any questions?

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7  
Thankyou, now I see why brainfuck was invented; to be more readable. –  Jim Burger Jun 1 '09 at 3:39
    
Heh heh. I was bored one day in a programming languages class and implemented the top example by writing the recursive elements (arguments, program counter, return value, in that order) into the int array. What else are you going to do while a prof drones on about how LISP is the coolest language ever created? –  Sniggerfardimungus Jul 19 '10 at 21:31
    
Write a solution in LISP, of course. –  new123456 Sep 25 '10 at 19:32
    
Too easy, and not very edifying. Now, implementing the call stack yourself - that's educational. –  Sniggerfardimungus Sep 27 '10 at 21:54

F#

#light

let fib = 
    let rec inner l r = 
        seq { 
            let next = l + r
            yield next
            yield! inner r next
        }
    seq { 
        yield 0
        yield 1
        yield! inner 0 1    
    }

let fibItem n = fib |> Seq.skip n |> Seq.hd
printfn "%d" (fibItem 10)
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I like the use of an infinite lazy sequence. That's nice. Very nice. –  ljs Nov 11 '08 at 0:32
    
seq monad ftw (oh sorry, 'computational workflow') –  BrightUmbra Nov 11 '08 at 0:34

Ruby:

 (0..12).inject([0,1]){ |x,y| print x[0].to_s+" " ; [x[1],x[0]+x[1]]}
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I came across this little beauty the other day:

function f($n)
  {
    $sqrt5 = pow(5, 0.5);
    $gr = (1+$sqrt5)/2;
    return floor(0.5+(pow($g, $n)/$sqrt5));
  }

Mmmmmm, non-recursive :)

Apparently though, it is fairly quickly limited by rounding errors due to the binary representations of floating point numbers... ah well, 'tis cool none-the-less.

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yeah, also sub-optimal as soon as you want more than 2 results, like the questions says ;). Using this repeatedly to generate a sequence would give you FLOP death vs good ol INTs –  Kent Fredric Nov 11 '08 at 0:28
    
On x86, the errors start for me at n=32. –  Steve Jessop Nov 11 '08 at 1:00
    
Non-recursive yes, but also non-iterative. Not practical, but very cool :) –  JoeBloggs Nov 27 '08 at 11:17

How about as music?

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10 INPUT "Terms to display: ", N
20 GOSUB 9000
30 END
9000 A = 0
9010 B = 1
9020 PRINT A
9030 IF N > 0 THEN PRINT B ELSE RETURN
9040 IF N < 2 THEN RETURN
9050 FOR I = 2 TO N
9060 C = A + B : PRINT C
9070 A =  B : B = C
9080 NEXT I
9090 RETURN

Written for (my memory of) the GW-BASIC of my youth; runs as written on bwBASIC.

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compile time Meta in the D Programming language

template fib(uint i)
{
  static if(i == 0)
    const uint fib = 0;
  else static if(i == 1)
    const uint fib = 1;
  else
    const uint fib = fib!(i-1) + fib!(i-2);
}

BTW as a side effect of template's reusing previously generated results, this is O(n) in the general case and over the life of the program, it is O(max(n)), that is its cost is proportional only to the largest value fed in.

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Like for Joel's answer, where do you output the results? –  PhiLho Dec 18 '09 at 20:33
    
fib!(n) can be used as a constant. –  BCS Dec 19 '09 at 0:09

Produces an infinite list of Fibonacci numbers in F# using unfolding:

#light
let fibs = (1I, 1I) |> Seq.unfold(fun (n0, n1) -> Some(n0, (n1, n0 + n1)))

[EDIT]: now supports bigint's.

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Two small additions will give you the Nth item of fib. F# rocks. let fibs = (0, 1) |> Seq.unfold(fun (n0, n1) -> Some(n0, (n1, n0 + n1))) let fibsItem n = fibs |> Seq.Skip n |> Seq.hd –  JaredPar Nov 11 '08 at 0:42
    
Indeed, thought i'd just show an alternative lazy list impl. Thanks. –  Jim Burger Nov 11 '08 at 0:47

Here's a lovely Clojure one-liner to produce a lazy, infinite sequence of Fibonacci numbers:

(def fibs (lazy-cat [0 1] (map + fibs (rest fibs))))

Output:

(take 10 fibs)
=> (0 1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 34)
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p.s. this is also pretty fast - less than one second to produce the first 100,000 Fibonacci numbers on my machine. –  mikera Dec 7 '10 at 17:06

Using R:

n <- 20
l1 <- (1+sqrt(5))/2 ; l2 <- (1-sqrt(5))/2

P <- matrix(c(0,1,1,0),nrow=2) 
S <- matrix(c(l1,1,l2,1),nrow=2)
L <- matrix(c(l1,0,0,l2),nrow=2)
C <- c(-1/(l2-l1),1/(l2-l1))

c(sapply(seq(1,n,2),function(k) P %*% S %*% L^k %*% C))[1:n]
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Perl Oneliner:

perl -e 'my @i=(0,1); (print q{ },$i[0]) and @i=($i[1],$i[0]+$i[1]) for (0..12);'

Increment 12 as neeeded.

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In Scala. Similar to the Haskell infinite list approach, but not quite as concise:

val fib: Stream[Int] = 0 :: 1 :: fib.zipWith(fib.tail) { _ + _ }

Note that this is slightly cheating since I assume you have the following implicit conversion in scope:

class StreamSyntax[A](str: =>Stream[A]) {
  def ::(hd: A) = Stream.cons(hd, str)

  def zipWith[B, C](that: Stream[B])(f: (A, B)=>C) = {
    str zip that map { case (x, y) => f(x, y) }
  }
}

implicit def convertSyntax[A](str: =>Stream[A]) = new StreamSyntax(str)
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Here, you can have the Fibonacci algorithm in different languages (sorry, the comments in the page are in french).

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C#

public static long[] GenerateFibonacciNumbers(int n)
    {
        long[] arr = new long[n];
        arr[0] = 0;
        arr[1] = 1;
        for (int i = 2; i < n; i++)
        {
            arr[i] = arr[i - 1] + arr[i - 2];
        }
        return arr;
    }
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+1 my favorite solution –  Dave O. Jul 17 '10 at 12:20

Runtime solution for the D programing language:

struct Fib_(T)
{
  int opApply(int delegate(ref T i) dg)
  {
    T i, j = 1, k = 1, m;
    i = 1; if(int r = dg(i)) return r;
    i = 1; if(int r = dg(i)) return r;
    while(true)
    {
      i = m = j + k; if(int r = dg(i)) return r;
      i = j = k + m; if(int r = dg(i)) return r;
      i = k = m + j; if(int r = dg(i)) return r;
    }
  }
}
template Fib(T) { Fib_!(T) Fib; }

usage:

foreach(long f; Fib!(long)) writef("%s\n", f);
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PowerShell using a pipe:

0..20 | %{ $i=0;$j=1} { $o = $i+$j; $i=$j; $j=$o; $o}
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er, you'd have to put 0..N if you wanted N of them... You didn't think I wrote a function, did you? –  Knox Nov 11 '08 at 2:56

Oddly few of these answers take advantage of the question: how to compute the first N Fibonacci numbers. Since Fib (n) = Fib(n-1) + Fib(n-2), the obvious technique is to store Fib(n) in array and compute the next Fib number from the array, computing the first N values in O(N) time with a small constant factor. Since I like odd languages, here it is coded in vanilla PARLANSE (a parallel language for which we aren't using the parallelism in this case):

[answer (array natural 0 dynamic)]

(define FibSeq
   (action (procedure [N natural])
      (;;  (resize answer 0 N)
           (= answer:0 0)
           (= answer:1 1)
           (do [n natural] 2 N 1
               (= answer:n (+ answer:(-- n)  answer(- n 2))
           )do
      );;
   )action
)define

Since PARLANSE and many compiled-to-machine-code languages (such as C) have machine-sized values, this only works for Fib(n)<2^32 (or whatever your machine word size limits are), but produces "new" results with ~~ 10 machine instructions per result.

If you need Fib(n) > machine word size, you need to go to infinite precision arithmetic (in any of the langauges that can do that) and the cost goes up several orders of magnitude.

The Python memoized version has the same basic idea, but IMHO this seems easier to read.

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I have this in VBA. I used double just to get high numbers.

Sub fib(i As Integer)
Dim j As Double, a As Double, b As Double
j = 0
a = 0
b = 1
While j < i
    Debug.Print a
    b = b + a
    a = b - a
    j = j + 1
Wend

End Sub
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non-recursive, linear runtime (and quite simple):

void fibPrintFirstN(int n) {
  int f1 = 0;
  int f2 = 1;
  while(n-- > 0) {
    printf("%d\n", f1);
    f1 += f2;
    f2 = f1;
  }
}
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In Java

public class Fib
{
  private static final double factor = 1 / Math.sqrt(5);
  private static final double phi = (1+Math.sqrt(5))/2;

   public static List<Long> getFibSequence(int n)
  {
     List<Long> s = new ArrayList<Long>();
     s.add(new Long(1));
     s.add(new Long(1));
     if(n > 2)
     {
         for(int i=3; i<=n; i++)
         {
            s.add( fibonacci(i));
         }
     }

     return s;
  }

  private static long fibonacci(int n) 
  {
    return Math.round(factor * Math.pow(phi, n));
  }
}
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Scheme -- untested, but assumed to work.

(define (last-two lst) (cons (car (cdr (reverse lst))) (car (reverse lst)))))

(define (fib-iter iters prev) 
 (if (= iters 1) 
  prev
  (let ((prev-1 (car (last-two prev)))
        (prev-2 (cdr (last-two prev))))
   (fib-iter (- iters 1) (append prev (list (+ prev-1 prev-2)))))))

(define (fibonacci x)
 (cond ((= x 0) '(1))
       ((= x 1) '(1 1))
       (else (fib-iter x (list 1 1))))
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