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Is it possible to add a record to the dns cache from java? Or will I have to use the JNI?

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The Java DNS cache? –  WineSoaked May 9 '10 at 3:25
    
Sorry no, the system one. I'm trying to proxy the default browser for certain sites and i figured adding a dns record for those sites pointing to my local proxy would be easiest way. –  ilia choly May 9 '10 at 5:32
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3 Answers 3

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Is it possible to add a record to the dns cache from java? Or will I have to use the JNI?

Assuming that you are talking about the DNS cache that Java applications use, the answer is No in both cases.

The cache is implemented in the java.net.InetAddress class; refer here for the source code. As you can see, the cache is implemented using private static attributes and all of the classes and methods involved are private or package private. In short, the only way you could get at the cache would be by using nasty reflection tricks to subvert the Java access rules.

Since this is implemented in pure Java, JNI won't help.

EDIT

Unfortunately, the link above no longer points to the OpenJDK code :-(.

FOLLOWUP

Re: these comments.


The Java DNS cache? – WineSoaked May 9 '10 at 3:25


Sorry no, the system one. I'm trying to proxy the default browser for certain sites and i figured adding a dns record for those sites pointing to my local proxy would be easiest way. – silverbandit91 May 9 '10 at 5:32

There is no way to directly plant things in the system DNS cache from Java. Indeed, I don't even think that Java uses the system DNS cache.

But there are better alternatives to what you are trying to do:

  • Get your users to configure their browsers to use an 'autoproxy.pac' file to determine which proxies to use. IMO, this is the best option.

  • Put entries for the hosts that you want to selectively proxy into "/etc/hosts" and configure (using "/etc/host.conf") your local resolver to look in "/etc/hosts" before talking to the DNS server. Unfortunately (like cache poisoning) this "pollutes" your DNS with bogus entries, can cause problems when using services other than HTTP / HTTPS.

Finally, you probably should rethink your goal of doing this totally transparently to your users:

  • If you are doing this to implement some company security or internet access rules, people can "route around" any measures you implement at this level. (You'd be better off firewalling your network and forcing to use a proxy for external access ... or something like that.)

  • If you are just trying to implement a useful service, you should use the autoproxy.pac approach which gives the users 1) visibility of what is going on (if they care to look), and 2) the option of opting in or out.

  • If you are trying to do something else ...

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Java DNS caching is implemented in a manner that should be mostly transparent to your code. You can read the javadoc of InetAddress to learn more about how you can configure the cache. But since it serves as a JVM-wide transparent proxy, the best way you have to add a cache entry would simply be to actually issue a request directed to the domain you want to cache the info for.

Out of curiosity, what's your use case?

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Why don't you just configure java for using the proxy?

java -DproxySet=true -DproxyHost=proxy -DproxyPort=8080 MyApp

or

System.setProperty("proxyPort","8080");
System.setProperty("proxyHost","proxy");

will do it.

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sorry. my question was unclear. The proxy is written in java and I need the browser to use it. –  ilia choly May 9 '10 at 15:55
    
You have two other possibilities: 1. Configure your browser to use your proxy, just be specifying your proxy. 2. If you just want to use your own proxy for certain sites, add those sites to C:\Windows\system32\etc\driver\hosts.conf, and map them to 127.0.0.1 (localhost) –  Daniel May 9 '10 at 18:29
    
this should be transparent to the user. Also, not all users have access to the hosts file. But I guess those might be my only options. –  ilia choly May 9 '10 at 23:05
1  
I think so. If I understand correctly, you want to poison the DNS cache without the user noticing. This would be a nice malware :), and I think its a good thing that you have to do some configuration for this to work. –  Daniel May 10 '10 at 5:24
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