Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

From the SQL::Statement::Functions documentation:

Creating User-Defined Functions
...
More complex functions can make use of a number of arguments always passed to functions automatically. Functions always receive these values in @_:
sub FOO { my( $self, $sth, $rowhash, @params ); }

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use 5.012;
use warnings; use strict;
use DBI;

my $dbh = DBI->connect( "DBI:CSV:", undef, undef, { RaiseError => 1, } );
my $table = 'wages';
my $array_ref = [   [ 'id', 'number' ],  
            [ 0, 6900 ], 
            [ 1, 3200 ], 
            [ 2, 1800 ],    ];

$dbh->do( "CREATE TEMP TABLE $table AS import( ? )", {}, $array_ref );

sub routine {
    my $self = shift;
    my $sth = shift;
    my $rowhash = shift; #
    return $_[0] / 30; 
};

$dbh->do( "CREATE FUNCTION routine" );
my $sth = $dbh->prepare( "SELECT id, routine( number ) AS result FROM  $table" );
$sth->execute();
$sth->dump_results();

When I try this I get an error-message:

DBD::CSV::st execute failed: Use of uninitialized value $_[0] in division (/) at ./so.pl line 27.
[for Statement "SELECT id, routine( number ) AS result FROM "wages""] at ./so.pl line 34.

When I comment out the third argument I works as expected ( because it looks as if the third argument is missing ):

#!/usr/bin/env perl
...  
sub routine {
    my $self = shift;
    my $sth = shift;
    #my $rowhash = shift;
    return $_[0] / 30; 
};
...

0, 230
1, 106.667
2, 60
3 rows

Is this a bug?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Also from the SQL::Statement::Functions documentation:

When using SQL::Statement/SQL::Parser directly to parse SQL, functions (either built-in or user-defined) may occur anywhere in a SQL statement that values, column names, table names, or predicates may occur. When using the modules through a DBD or in any other context in which the SQL is both parsed and executed, functions can occur in the same places except that they can not occur in the column selection clause of a SELECT statement that contains a FROM clause.

i.e.

SELECT id, routine( number ) AS result FROM  wages

will not work.

Rewrite your function to return a table, something like this:

sub routine {
    my($self,$sth,$rowhash,@params) = @_;
    return [ [qw(id result)],
             map { [ $_->[0], $_->[1] / 30 ] } @$array_ref ];
};

$dbh->do( "CREATE FUNCTION routine" );
my $sth = $dbh->prepare( "SELECT * FROM routine()" );
$sth->execute();
$sth->dump_results();

With the expected results:

$ perl dl.pl 
0, 230
1, 106.667
2, 60
3 rows
share|improve this answer
    
You could also try it as is, without using $rowhash, but that sems like relying on undocumented and likely to change behaviour. The bug isn't that your function doesn't work correctly, it is that it works at all, based on the documentation. –  MkV May 9 '10 at 10:19
    
If my interpretation of this part of the docu is right, then the same applies to the built-in-function - it's a pity. –  sid_com May 9 '10 at 15:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.