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I've got quite big trouble, because i need to anathematise from styling some input types. I had something like:

.registration_form_right input:not([type="radio")
{
 //Nah.
}

But i don't want to style checkboxes too.

I've tried:

.registration_form_right input:not([type="radio" && type="checkbox"])
.registration_form_right input:not([type="radio" && "checkbox"])
.registration_form_right input:not([type="radio") && .registration_form_right input:not(type="checkbox"])

How to use &&? And I'll need to use || soon, and I think that usage will be same.

Thanks.

Update: I still don't know how to use || and && correctly. I couldn't find anything in W3 docs.

Last update:

Thanks, now I know something more, and I won't use them never. And I'll change :not

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4  
"anathematise" Yikes. You want to threaten people attempting to style checkboxes with devine retribution? (You probably meant "exempt" or similar, e.g., "I need to exempt some input types from a styling rule.") –  T.J. Crowder May 9 '10 at 9:01
1  
Well, i couldn't find good translation to phrasal verb from my language ;) –  Misiur May 9 '10 at 9:06
    
I think @T.J. Crowder probably understood that. But it was funny...particularly the irony of his misspelling 'divine' =D –  David Thomas May 9 '10 at 10:32
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5 Answers 5

up vote 19 down vote accepted

"&&" works by stringing-together multiple selectors like-so:

<div class="class1 class2"></div>

div.class1.class2
{
  /* foo */
}

Another example:

<input type="radio" class="class1" />

input[type="radio"].class1
{
  /* foo */
}

"||" works by separating multiple selectors with commas like-so:

<div class="class1"></div>
<div class="class2"></div>

div.class1,
div.class2
{
  /* foo */
}

As a side note, I would recommend against using the "not" selector because it is not supported by Internet Explorer. Based on one survey, 60% of people use some version of Internet Explorer, so your website will not work for a lot of people.

-Geoffrey Lee

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Ok, thanks for light. I hate styling forms, but it's my task, and site isn't mine. I'll apply classes to inputs. –  Misiur May 9 '10 at 9:02
3  
Here's a useful chart of what Internet Explorer supports: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc351024(VS.85).aspx#selectors –  geofflee May 9 '10 at 9:09
2  
Who uses IE now :) –  Tarun Jan 5 '13 at 14:11
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AND (&&):

.registration_form_right input:not([type="radio"]):not([type="checkbox"])

OR (||):

.registration_form_right input:not([type="radio"]), 
   .registration_form_right input:not([type="checkbox"])
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Nah, fail too. It'll apply 1 to 2 and 2 to 1 –  Misiur May 9 '10 at 8:56
    
@Misiur: I don't understand. –  KennyTM May 9 '10 at 9:05
    
@KennyTM: Look. Using comma will do something like this: .registration_form_right input:not([type="radio"]) will apply to everything including checkbox, and .registration_form_right input:not([type="checkbox"]) will apply to everything, including radio –  Misiur May 9 '10 at 9:07
    
@Misiur: Of course. The 2nd is for the "OR" (a.k.a. ||) case. Updated to clarify. –  KennyTM May 9 '10 at 9:24
1  
@KennyTM: What Misiur is trying to say is… Your "||" example is syntactically correct, but if you simplify the expression, it becomes just ".registration_form_right input" because the union of the two selectors includes all inputs. –  geofflee May 9 '10 at 9:41
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The :not pseudo-class is not supported by IE. I'd got for something like this instead:

.registration_form_right input[type="text"],
.registration_form_right input[type="password"],
.registration_form_right input[type="submit"],
.registration_form_right input[type="button"] {
  ...
}

Some duplication there, but it's a small price to pay for higher compatibility.

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You're quite right. Hovewer, best is adding class to input. –  Misiur May 9 '10 at 9:00
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I guess you hate to write more selectors and divide them by a comma?

.registration_form_right input:not([type="radio"]),  
.registration_form_right input:not([type="checkbox"])  
{  
}

and BTW this

not([type="radio" && type="checkbox"])  

looks to me more like "input which does not have both these types" :)

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1  
That wouldn't work, because the first selector would select all non- radio, (but would select the checkbox), and the second would do the reverse. The union of the two would contain both checkbox and radio. –  Eric May 9 '10 at 8:53
    
That first example won't && them together, it'll fire for inputs that aren't radios for the first selector, AND inputs that aren't checkboxes, which means all inputs :-) –  Dan F May 9 '10 at 8:54
    
You're wrong. Then, first one will apply to second, and second, to first. –  Misiur May 9 '10 at 8:55
    
you're right :) –  Jaroslav Záruba May 9 '10 at 9:36
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Just in case if any one is stuck like me. After going though the post and some hit and trial this worked for me.

input:not([type="checkbox"])input:not([type="radio"])
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