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Can someone explain why the example with integers results in different values for x and y and the example with the list results in x and y being the same object?

x = 42
y = x
x = x + 1
print x # 43
print y # 42

x = [ 1, 2, 3 ]
y = x
x[0] = 4
print x # [4, 2, 3]
print y # [4, 2, 3]
x is y # True
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y=list(x) . –  Lohoris May 9 '10 at 9:07
    
dupe many times over –  SilentGhost May 9 '10 at 9:08
    
wow! this looks just like what i was asking last month in stackoverflow.com/questions/2573135/2573965#2573965 –  wescpy May 10 '10 at 4:30
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Because integers are immutable, while list are mutable. You can see from the syntax. In x = x + 1 you are actually assigning a new value to x (it is alone on the LHS). In x[0] = 4, you're calling the index operator on the list and giving it a parameter - it's actually equivalent to x.__setitem__(0, 4), which is obviously changing the original object, not creating a new one.

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Is it not possible to get references to immutable objects? –  hekevintran May 9 '10 at 10:06
3  
All "variables" are references. Th difference is that you cannot change immutable objects. Once they are created, they never change - any attempted change will create a new object. –  Max Shawabkeh May 9 '10 at 10:11
1  
Stating "assigning a new value to x" is disingenuous and potentially confusing. What is happening is that a reference to a new object (result of x + 1) is bound to the name x. Python does not have the concept of lvalue/rvalue as everything is referenced - so the distinction is important. –  Jeremy Brown May 9 '10 at 13:02
    
@Jeremy Brown: I stand by my wording. The new value is the object created from evaluating the expression x + 1. After the assignment (that's what it is called in the Python documentation) x refers to the new value. And there's a concept of rvalue/lvalue in Python. It's not the same as in other languages, but it is there - that's why the left side of the = has to be a (usually singular) sequence of identifiers, not an expression, in the basic assignment statement. See: docs.python.org/reference/… –  Max Shawabkeh May 9 '10 at 13:29
    
Note the wording of the first sentence (emphasis mine) - "Assignment statements are used to (re)bind names to values..." rvalue/lvalue has very specific meaning for C-like languages (this is not a general BNF concept). Your wording implies that there is a memory "slot" to which a value is assigned. That's not the case in Python and that's why you can't overload the assignment operator. I merely suggest using terms such as bind/rebind to completely disambiguate how assignment works. The most common pitfall I see with new Python programmers is not understanding that reference concept. –  Jeremy Brown May 10 '10 at 0:18
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If you do y = x, y and x are the reference to the same object. But integers are immutable and when you do x + 1, the new integer is created:

>>> x = 1
>>> id(x)
135720760
>>> x += 1
>>> id(x)
135720748
>>> x -= 1
>>> id(x)
135720760

When you have a mutable object (e.g. list, classes defined by yourself), x is changed whenever y is changed, because they point to a single object.

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That's because when you have a list or a tuple in python you create a reference to an object. When you say that y = x you reference to the same object with y as x does. So when you edit the object of x y changes with it.

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Less confusing than accepted answer. –  Ad N Mar 12 '13 at 21:41
2  
“when you have a list or a tuple” is pretty misleading. –  minitech Jun 20 '13 at 14:01
    
Yeah I'm sorry about that. What I meant to say was that it doesn't matter which of the two, since they are both immutable. –  Bloeper Jul 19 '13 at 8:29
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As the previous answers said the code you wrote assigns the same object to different names such aliases. If you want to assign a copy of the original list to the new variable (object actually) use this solution:

>>> x=[1,2,3]
>>> y=x[:] #this makes a new list
>>> x
[1, 2, 3]
>>> y
[1, 2, 3]
>>> x[0]=4
>>> x
[4, 2, 3]
>>> y
[1, 2, 3]
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