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I have next block in the end of each my stored procedure for SQL Server 2008

BEGIN TRY
    BEGIN TRAN
        -- my code
    COMMIT
END TRY
BEGIN CATCH
    IF (@@trancount > 0)
    BEGIN
        ROLLBACK
        DECLARE @message NVARCHAR(MAX)
        DECLARE @state INT
        SELECT @message = ERROR_MESSAGE(), @state = ERROR_STATE()
        RAISERROR (@message, 11, @state)
    END
END CATCH

Is it possible to switch CATCH-block to

BEGIN CATCH
    ROLLBACK
    DECLARE @message NVARCHAR(MAX)
    DECLARE @state INT
    SELECT @message = ERROR_MESSAGE(), @state = ERROR_STATE()
    RAISERROR (@message, 11, @state)
END CATCH

or just

BEGIN CATCH
    ROLLBACK
END CATCH

?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Actually, I never start a new transaction if I'm already in one.

This deals with nested stored procs, distributed TXNs and TransactionScope

Remember, there is no such thing as a nested transaction in SQL Server anyway.

DECLARE @StartTranCount int

BEGIN TRY
    SET @StartTranCount = @@TRANCOUNT
    IF @StartTranCount = 0 BEGIN TRAN
        -- my code
    IF @StartTranCount = 0 COMMIT TRAN
END TRY
BEGIN CATCH
    IF @StartTranCount = 0 AND @@trancount > 0
    BEGIN
        ROLLBACK TRAN
        DECLARE @message NVARCHAR(MAX)
        DECLARE @state INT
        SELECT @message = ERROR_MESSAGE(), @state = ERROR_STATE()
        RAISERROR (@message, 11, @state)
    END
    /*
    or just
    IF @StartTranCount = 0 AND @@trancount  
        ROLLBACK TRAN
    */
END CATCH
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I mean that I always start a transaction (and try-block) in the beginning of each my DML stored procedure. So my question is - have I to check @@trancount in appropriate catch-block? –  abatishchev May 9 '10 at 11:18
    
@abatishchev: yes: it may already have rolled bck (eg in a trigger) –  gbn May 9 '10 at 12:01

You need to check that there is a transaction in scope before trying to rollback.

You can use the following:

BEGIN CATCH
    IF @@TRANCOUNT > 0
        ROLLBACK TRANSACTION;
END CATCH;

This will rollback the transaction, but no error will be reported back to your application.

Check MSDN for more info.

share|improve this answer
    
What if I'm always inside a transaction scope? See my edited post –  abatishchev May 9 '10 at 10:15
1  
If you know that you are within a transaction, then the only statement you will need is the ROLLBACK statement. You will still not get any error reported to your app. –  Oded May 9 '10 at 10:46

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