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In rails guides it's described like this:

Objects will be in addition destroyed if they’re associated with :dependent => :destroy, and deleted if they’re associated with :dependent => :delete_all

Right, cool. But what's the difference between being destroyed and being deleted? I tried both and it seems to do the same thing.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 98 down vote accepted

The difference is with callback.

The :delete_all, made directly in your application the delete by SQL :

DELETE * FROM users where compagny_id = XXXX

With the :destroy, there are an instantiation of all of you children. So, if you can't destroy it or if each has their own :dependent, its can be called.

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43  
The instantiation and the calling of destroy on each of the children objects will be slow if you have a lot of children (and n^2 if you have grandchildren, and so on). delete_all is the kind of "nuke it from orbit" solution where you don't care about / don't have any before / after destroy callbacks on the models. –  Ryan Bigg May 10 '10 at 1:06
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See newer answer below! –  berezovskiy Jan 9 '14 at 22:01

See destroy deletes its associated elements where delete_all can delete multiple data from self table as DELETE * FROM table where field = 'xyz'

:Dependent possible options:

Controls what happens to the associated objects when their owner is destroyed. Note that these are implemented as callbacks, and Rails executes callbacks in order. Therefore, other similar callbacks may affect the :dependent behavior, and the :dependent behavior may affect other callbacks.

:destroy causes all the associated objects to also be destroyed.

:delete_all causes all the associated objects to be deleted directly from the database (so callbacks will not be executed).

:nullify causes the foreign keys to be set to NULL. Callbacks are not executed.

:restrict_with_exception causes an exception to be raised if there are any associated records.

:restrict_with_error causes an error to be added to the owner if there are any associated objects.

If using with the :through option, the association on the join model must be a belongs_to, and the records which get deleted are the join records, rather than the associated records.

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On a Rails' model association you can specify the :dependent option, which can take one of the following three forms:

  • :destroy/:destroy_all The associated objects are destroyed alongside this object by calling their destroy method
  • :delete/:delete_all All associated objects are destroyed immediately without calling their :destroy method
  • :nullify All associated objects' foreign keys are set to NULL without calling their save callbacks
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See api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActiveRecord/Associations/… (search for "nullify") for the authoritative rdocs. –  mrm Aug 15 '11 at 4:54
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Since Rails 3.0 it's also possible to specify :restrict. If set to :restrict this object cannot be deleted if it has any associated object. –  RocketR Dec 30 '11 at 11:00
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there's no :delete or :destroy_all options by the looks of it? The :dependent option expects either :destroy, :delete_all, :nullify or :restrict (:delete) –  Mike Campbell Feb 5 '13 at 15:42
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@MikeCampbell, :delete and :destroy_all options do not exist. However, there are class methods on models that are called delete and destroy_all so it might be the reason for confusion. –  berezovskiy Jan 9 '14 at 22:09
    
@MikeCampbell You are missing few more options, See The :dependent option must be one of [:destroy, :delete_all, :nullify, :restrict_with_error, :restrict_with_exception] –  Pravin Mishra Feb 3 '14 at 4:16

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