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As Jeff Atwood noted, we are typists first, programmers second. Fast typing and editing may not be essential to be a good programmer, but it certainly helps. I noticed that I consciously and subconsciously use various tricks to get my intent across to the computer as fast as possible.

What tricks can be used to type and edit code faster?

I'm hoping to collect a nice list here that we can all learn from, so that we can be ever so slightly more productive. One trick per answer please!

This is not about typing speed in general. There are other questions about that. It's also not about general answers like "learn your editor's shortcut keys". Think of this topic as micro-optimizations for specific cases. See my own answers for examples of what I mean.

(Are you coming here from TDPE2? You want to read Toughest Developer Puzzle Ever 2.)

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43  
Pretty much all of these tips could be replaced with 'use Vim' –  rjh May 9 '10 at 17:12
3  
@Vulcan Eager: The First Rule of Vim, that I learned during the past few days: if you can come up with it, Vim can do it. vim.wikia.com/wiki/Search_and_replace_in_a_visual_selection, sethmason.com/2007/09/27/vim-tip-select-column.html and stackoverflow.com/questions/1608204/multiple-selections-in-vim I did not test these, so they may not be entirely what you meant, but you get the idea. I have never felt a need for the last two, though -- if you actually use stuff like that on a regular basis, please post an answer to this question and explain :) –  Thomas May 11 '10 at 14:54
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closed as not constructive by Andrew Marshall, gnat, birryree, Stony, Andy Hayden Dec 29 '12 at 15:47

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61 Answers

The single most useful (and potentially obvious, but who know?) tip that must have saved me hundred of hours over my programing time:

Use whole word caret movement shortcuts (control-left arrow/control-right arrow) to rapidly go the line location you are seeking. Use them in conjunction with shift for quick selecting of a couple of words.

Corollary: use beginning of line/end of line shortcuts.

Example: let's say you have the following line of code

ClassA toto = new ClassA("A nice string", 10, -300, MAX_VALUE );

Your caret is on the keyword 'new' and you want to change -300 to -299. What is the fastest way, assuming both hands are on the keyboard?

  • Moving hand from keyboard to mouse and go to location, move back to keyboard then edit? No.
  • Press the right arrow ~30 times? No, not even close
  • Press control-right seven times, control-backspace once then type 299? I wouldn't fault anyone for doing that, it is the right idea
  • Press end, control-left twice, control-delete then type 299. Bingo
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44  
In Vim: f-1<ctrl-A>. f- goes to the next "-" character. 1<Ctrl-A> increments the number under the cursor by one. That is four keystrokes. –  Dave Kirby May 9 '10 at 15:36
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Correction - in Vim you can do it in three keystrokes, since <ctrl-A> defaults to incrementing by one - f-<ctrl-A>. –  Dave Kirby May 9 '10 at 15:44
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@slacker: The power of Vim keeps surprising me. Maybe I should learn it beyond :qa!... ;) –  Thomas May 9 '10 at 17:51
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I 'm in the :qa! camp as well regarding Vim. I think that all this "Vim does this in N keystrokes" stuff is not relevant. All kinds of software does all kinds of things, e.g. with ReSharper I can safely rename a class that's referenced in 1000 files with (3 + as many edits I make) keystrokes. What does that say? It would be better to just provide advice that can be used by everyone regardless of their specific choice of IDE or editor. –  Jon May 9 '10 at 22:58
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Vim shortcuts are so unintuitive. Whatever fraction of time you gain by pressing fewer keys is massively wasted by remembering the shortcut (sure, f=find, but s=search and f could be other things), deciding that the quickest way to get to where you want is to do a find for the - character, then finding and typing the keys on the keyboard. In the meantime, I've used the Ctrl key at the far corner of the keyboard and the arrow keys that are in their own block, to press twice as many keys without even looking at the keyboard in a quarter of the time. /rant –  DisgruntledGoat May 11 '10 at 10:29
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When pasting with the mouse, work backwards through the line.

Suppose you have a line like this:

foo(x, y, z);

and you want it to look like this:

foo(bar.x, bar.y, bar.z);

If you paste the bar. with the mouse (either middle-click on *nix, or click and Ctrl + V), it's faster to start at the back. That way, the next location where you want to paste does not move, so you can go there faster.

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3  
This is a great trick for applying edits to any sort of work from hardcopy. Work backwards and your line numbers / column positions (for soft wrap) won't change! –  Matt B. May 10 '10 at 5:24
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After pasting, the cursor would be after the dot in "bar.", which means you'd need to move your cursor more spaces to the left to paste the next "bar." –  AngryWhenHungry May 19 '10 at 11:42
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For all bracketed constructs -- (), [], {}, "", /**/, etc -- type the bracketing first and then fill it in. In particular, for /**/, type this on the number pad.

This also helps avoid confusing compilation errors from forgetting the end bracket.

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6  
My editor does this by default. –  JUST MY correct OPINION May 9 '10 at 15:21
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/* */ on the numpad... why didn't I think of that? That's exactly the kind of thing that I was hoping for :) –  Thomas May 9 '10 at 15:27
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I'm not sure whether typing the brackets first is actually faster -- you have to move your hand off the home row and to the left arrow key to fill them in. However, the time savings of not forgetting brackets are probably worth it. –  Thomas May 9 '10 at 15:32
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Learn Vim. It is available on virtually every platform, and you can do things from the keyboard that are unimaginable in most other editors. The learning curve is steep so expect your productivity to plummet for a couple of weeks, then soar as your muscle memory learns the Vim way of doing things.

See my comment to AD's answer to this question for an example.

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Would upvote 10,000 times. Every other answer, except (grudgingly), the one about Emacs, is some workaround for a sub-par editor. –  Derrick Turk May 10 '10 at 18:50
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steep learning curve is not worth it... –  Tim May 10 '10 at 21:36
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@Tim: For something you're going to do for the next forty years or so, it makes little sense to complain about a steep learning curve. If it takes you forty hours to become reasonably proficient with vim, and it saves you 0.1% of your working time for your next forty years, you're coming out ahead. –  David Thornley May 11 '10 at 13:44
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I don't know anyone who can be as productive in vim within 40 hours as they can be in something like visual studio right from the start... My choice of IDE is also chosen for other capabilities - not just super-fancy ctrl-alt/keyboard tricks. –  Tim May 11 '10 at 13:55
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@Tim wins the award for lazy and being one of the many developers I meet who keep doing things the slow way for the rest of his life. Let me guess, touch typing is too steep a learning curve, too? Hunt-and-peck programmers are the biggest joke ever. –  PP. Jun 17 '10 at 7:32
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Keep line endings in mind while cutting and pasting.

Treat newlines as normal characters when cutting and pasting. When cutting and pasting one or more full lines, include the final newline, so you don't have to remove it in one place and re-add it in another.

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So many programmers ignore this one. I have always done it, and I can't seem to figure out why it's not more common. –  MJB May 9 '10 at 14:46
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For me, pasting several lines onto the end of an existing line just seems wrong, I always like to insert a new line to paste code onto. –  MiffTheFox May 9 '10 at 15:33
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Learn and get comfortable with the beginning/end-of-line and beginning/end-of-file shortcut keys.

By environment, those are:

EnvironmentBOLEOLBOFEOF
───────────────┼──────────┼──────────┼─────────────┼─────────────
Windows (all)  │  Home    │  End     │  Ctrl+Home  │  Ctrl+End
Linux (all)    │  Home    │  End     │  Ctrl+Home  │  Ctrl+End
Mac (all)      │  ⌘←      │  ⌘→      │  ⌘↑         │  ⌘↓
───────────────┼──────────┼──────────┼─────────────┼─────────────
Emacs          │  Ctrl+A  │  Ctrl+E  │  Meta+<     │  Meta+>
Vim            │  0       │  $       │  gg         │  G

You can quickly highlight an entire line of code by pressing the EOL key, then holding ⇧ and pressing the BOL key (that's End, Shift+Home on Windows) and then use the up or down arrows to highlight multiple lines.

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Note that this is on a Windows machine, not on a Mac. On a Mac, Home and End scroll to the beginning and end, respectively, of a file without moving the cursor. To move to the beginning and end of a line, use ⌘← and ⌘→, respectively. Hold down ⇧ to select as well (so to select a whole line, you can hit ⌘→ and then ⌘⇧←). To go to the beginning and end of a file, use ⌘↑ and ⌘↓, respectively. (The ⌘ and ⇧ symbols denote, respectively, the command and shift keys.) –  Antal S-Z May 9 '10 at 18:09
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@Auguste: 0 in Vim goes to the BOL, and ^ goes to the first non-whitespace character on the line. ^ can therefore move you forward. Eclipse, and I believe lots of other IDEs, has the Home button first go to the first non-whitespace character, and if the cursor is in that place and Home is pressed, it goes to the BOL. –  Heikki Naski May 18 '10 at 16:07
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Using IntelliSense or the equivalent always helps speed up coding.

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It's a good thing the use of Intellisense is default (we hope). –  IAbstract May 9 '10 at 15:34
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ctrl+space is easier to hit I think than alt+right –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft May 11 '10 at 17:18
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When one hand is on the mouse, use Enter on the numpad.

When my left hand is on the left side of the keyboard, and my right hand is on the mouse, I sometimes hit numpad Enter with the thumb of my right hand. This only works if you use the mouse with your right hand and have a relatively low keyboard (mine's a Logitech UltraX).

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3  
I do my work on laptops mostly. This doesn't work well. ;) –  JUST MY correct OPINION May 9 '10 at 15:21
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Use Das Keyboard Ultimate.

It will help you look more at your screen and less at your keyboard.

Keyboard with blank keys

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8  
I haven't looked at my keyboard in ages. Getting an unlabelled one just seems a bit ... quirky. –  JUST MY correct OPINION May 9 '10 at 15:20
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Or, just peel the stickers off your current keyboard. –  DisgruntledGoat May 11 '10 at 10:33
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Mine got unlabeled on the sweet spots by heavy use....still a few years left to unlabel the rest of it. –  Marek May 11 '10 at 15:57
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This is the keyboard equivalent of training wheels on a bike. Just ride the damn thing. –  rjh May 11 '10 at 22:36
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I don't really look at my keyboard anyway - why would I pay 100 dollars for something that removes functionality? Sometimes I don't remember which / or * key is which on the numpad. A quick look is worth it then. –  Andrei Krotkov May 20 '10 at 5:41
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I spend significantly more time tracing, testing, debugging, reading, and thinking about my code than I spend typing it. I could increase my typing speed 100x and don't think I would get a significant boost in productivity.

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Perhaps, but that's not the point of this discussion :) –  Thomas May 10 '10 at 6:27
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The funny aspect is that most slow typing programmers say that typing speed does not matter and almost no fast typing programmer would agree with this. –  Marek May 11 '10 at 15:56
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It's not so much about the actual time spend typing but about not having your flow of thoughts interrupted. –  Christian May 11 '10 at 16:00
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Typing skill also decreases your chances of making mistakes. You would probably spend less time tracing, testing, debugging and reading the code if there wouldn't be those typos in variable names. And most programmers don't just think about a non-trivial problem and code it in one go, without experimenting, changing, refactoring or rolling back the code several times. And of course, there's documentation, emails and instant messages to be written which can all contain code. –  Heikki Naski May 11 '10 at 16:07
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I disagree with this. Have you ever watched a programmer who does everything the slow way? It really is ridiculously slow. Furthermore, it's so slow that you have to slow your mind down so you don't get to far ahead of what you're doing. –  tster May 11 '10 at 22:22
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The single piece of software that saves me a lot of time is the multi clipboard manager (like ClipX). It allows you to copy several parts of a source file at once without switching back and forth between files, and furthermore it keeps the clipboard history so, if you accidentally overwrote the latest clipboard entry, you can easily recover it.

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5  
In other words, a poor man's Vim named registers? –  slacker May 11 '10 at 20:44
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@slacker its better than vims because it works on and across every program. –  ino Nov 14 '11 at 0:13
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Learn to use regular expressions in your editor/IDE.

For example, earlier today, I was annoyed by a file that had excess whitespace at the end of the majority of its lines. Replace \s+$ with an empty string took care of it.

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2  
I have been just amazed sometimes at the sheer amount of work I've saved by using a regular expression search-and-replace. It is really one of the most amazing things computing has to offer - and I consider myself adept at regexps. Sometimes I set up an interactive search and replace and find myself deliriously overjoyed at the transformations occurring in front of my eyes. –  PP. Jun 17 '10 at 7:40
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Block Selection

alt text

Alt+Shift+Up

Alt+Shift+Down

Alt+Shift+Left

Alt+Shift+Right

This has saved me tons of time when making repetitive changes in long blocks of code (providing it's properly indented). It works with Visual Studio as well as with Notepad++.

Image source and more complete explanation.

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1  
Emacs also offers this functionality in cua-mode: press ctrl-Enter to activate. –  PP. Jun 17 '10 at 7:38
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For completeness: in vim, visual block mode is activated with Ctrl+V. Replacing (with 'c') replaces all lines in the block, which is tremendously useful. –  Thomas Jun 21 '10 at 10:36
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When pasting with the keyboard, work forwards through the line.

Suppose you have a line like this:

foo(x, y, z);

and you want it to look like this:

foo(bar.x, bar.y, bar.z);

If you paste the bar. with the keyboard, then navigate with the arrow keys to the next location, it's faster to start at the front. For example:

foo(bar.x, y, z);
foo(bar.x, bar.y, z);  // and so forth

Otherwise, you have the newly pasted bar. to navigate over..

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My favourite is the shortcut to jump to the closing curly brace: Ctrl + ] in Visual Studio and Ctrl + Shift + P in Eclipse. I use this a lot.

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Switching to overwrite(replace) mode by pressing Insert button can speed things up sometimes quite a bit when you need to make replacements without changing a word length (usually in a vertical block of text). For example if you need to increase indexes by 1 here:

array[0] = ...
array[1] = ...
array[2] = ...
array[3] = ...

Switching to overwrite mode allows you to navigate to required position in every line by using down and left arrow keys, which is much faster than down and backspace as they are far apart. And if your editor remembers cursor position, then all you need is use a down key after each replacement.

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9  
Now somebody's going to say how you can type 4 Ctrl+A j in vim, or something like that... :) –  Thomas May 10 '10 at 6:45
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Simple bit of advice that I had honestly never thought of. The number of times I have to edit a text file to change a single value is crazy, and this would save me so much time. (Obviously, writing a tool to do the replacements for me would save more time, but you know how it is) :) –  ZombieSheep May 11 '10 at 8:38
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In Vim, I'd do it with <C-a>j.j.j. –  Heikki Naski May 14 '10 at 16:51
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Watch out. If there's both more than 9 values, this trick will sometimes overwrite the ] on the 10th row when your fingers continue flying on auto. –  Andrei Krotkov May 20 '10 at 5:43
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Avoid mouse, learn shortcuts. What can be done with mouse usually can be done ten times faster using keyboard if you know your shortcuts.

Also think more and type less, and use an advanced editor that you know well.

Two exemples of precious features:

  • smart use of regex or of macros avoided me hours of typing (a standard typist may find them too complex, but for programmers it should be a piece of cake).
  • use autocompletion features of your editor (also avoid typo for keywords).
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Set up keyboard macros for your commonly used patterns.

In Visual Studio I use Ctrl + ALT as a base.

Ctrl + ALT + i - if () {} else {}
Ctrl + ALT + f - for (;;) {}

I omitted the line breaks above.

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2  
Or just type for then press TAB twice. –  Callum Rogers May 9 '10 at 17:29
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Unless I'm reading something wrong, I feel like this would actually waste time for me. The time I'd spend navigating to between the parentheses and brackets would pretty much equal the amount of time it takes me to type if () {} else {} around whatever code goes in there. Of course, that might just be me. –  Maulrus Jun 6 '10 at 1:53
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Navigate backward and forward between the places in code that you're editing.

A lot of time can be wasted scrolling and mouse-wheeling between several physically distant areas in the same project. In Visual Studio, hit Ctrl + - and you will jump back to the last place in the code that you made an edit. Ctrl + Shift + - will jump you forward again.

For bonus points, bind these shortcuts to the back and forward buttons on your mouse. Awesome.

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3  
I think this is editor-specific... –  Thomas May 9 '10 at 17:49
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Oops! Yes, this is Visual Studio specific. But I'll leave it here, since it's still useful, and there's some other editor-specific stuff above. –  Daniel I-S May 9 '10 at 20:58
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Use incremental search and backward incremental search for navigation. It's like teleporting instead of walking - usually Ctrl + S or Ctrl + R (Emacs bindings) or Ctrl + I in Visual Studio plus two to three keystrokes get you anywhere on the screen. Well, unless you're editing ASCII art or binary memory dumps :)

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The best musicians still practice, and the best typists would in theory, still practice.

Part of building speed and accuracy is simply "slow down and perfect it", which is amoung the biggest hurdle for music students to overcome (according to well know famous musicians/teachers, such as Andreas Segovia). In theory the same principles apply. It should be easier to perfect than an instrument, because typing is not a performance art (unless you are presenting). So when you make any mistake, you should stop and think and feel your whole body. The muscle tension in the fingers, the hands, spinal column position and curvature, etc.... Then focus on the tension and correct, by relaxing and slowly moving through the motions until it's smooth and you are totally relaxed except for the absolute minimal muscle tension required to move the finger to where you want it to go. This builds muscle memory, and you have to unlearn all the bad habits, by slowing down, and eliminating all wasted motion.

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Learn to use either hand to type Shift, Meta/Alt, and Ctrl.

(One reason I don't use a Mac is that the Mac requires four modifier keys, and I can't find a reliable keyboard that has all four on each side.)

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It's a shame that the DVORAK keyboard layout hasn't really caught on.

QWERTY was allegedly designed with the intention of capping typing speeds so as to prevent mechanical breakage of the good ol' typewriters.

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1  
If I could get a Dvorak, I would take the time to learn it. –  IAbstract May 9 '10 at 17:21
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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  Pindatjuh May 9 '10 at 17:51
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Please read utdallas.edu/~liebowit/keys1.html or reason.com/archives/1996/06/01/typing-errors before investing your time in learning Dvorak. –  Rafał Dowgird May 9 '10 at 21:01
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I use Dvorak right now because I can't take the time to get used to QWERTY again. Learning Dvorak was a net loss: I can't type any faster, it took a while to get proficient again, symbols are hard to get to, my wrists don't feel any better, and as Christopher was saying it makes switching/sharing computers really awkward. –  IV. May 11 '10 at 19:41
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Remember that in Visual Studio if you copy or cut with no text selected, it will copy or cut the whole line. Then when you paste back in with no text selected, the line will be inserted above the line the cursor is on.

This has saved me a lot of time, especially when reordering a few lines. It makes dealing with leading or trailing empty lines a lot easier as well.

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If Visual Studio is in context, then there are several third-party plugin/tools which enhance typing efficiency of developers.

One such, I use is CodeRush. There are even videos available for the same.

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Eclipse (and other IDE's I'm sure) has templates (menu Java -> Editor -> Template) where you can add you own pattern blocks. For example

if (${name:var} == null) {
    ${name} = new ${type}(${arguments});
    ${cursor}
}

return ${name};

gives you a nice fill-in-the-blank block of code that can be tab\shift+tab navigated until you hit eneter (then it's just regular text).

Also, Ctrl + Space brings up autocomplete.

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If you have the fourth and fifth mouse programmable buttons (and depending on programming software), set macros to your mouse buttons:

  1. Enter
  2. Cut
  3. Paste
  4. Build
  5. New class macro
  6. New getter/setter macro

This could save a lot of time. Think WoW, except really useful.

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1  
I use mostly vim but I also enjoy using just the mouse sometimes. I added some context menu options for right click, like "Find the word under cursor", the same with a backwards search, "Open taglist"(methods and classes) and "Go to tag" so I can browse the code easily using only the mouse. –  Heikki Naski May 14 '10 at 16:28
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Buy and learn to use a Kinesis contoured keyboard:

I bought my first one in 1995 and I own five of them. To learn it, you are best off using a typing-tutor program, but once you've learned you can switch back and forth easily.

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2  
It's not about the typing speed, in this case, but about keeping your wrists healthy –  Adriano Varoli Piazza Jun 28 '10 at 19:45
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Zen Coding is awesome. It's available for multiple IDEs, and it's great if you program HTML a lot, like me.

Get it here.

It's also useful to press Ctrl + Space when using some IDEs, which will give you function parameter hints, etc.

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Depending on you IDE, you might have custom keyboard templates. which I find very productive.

For example, Delphi has live templates and Visual Studio has code snippets. Both also have third party products that add even more functionality, such as Castalia, ModelMaker Code Explorer for Delphi and CodeRush (outstanding!) for Visual Studio. The only downside to these third party tools is trying to use a copy of the IDE that doesn't have them installed.

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