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I'd like to get the total count of results and top n rows of some query - is it possible in one statement?

I'd expect the results as:

count(..) column1        column2
125         some_value   some_value
125         some_value   some_value

Thank you in advance!

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4 Answers 4

Like this:

SELECT TOP 100 --optional
    MC.Cnt, M.Column1, M.Column2
FROM
    myTable M
    CROSS JOIN
    (SELECT COUNT(*) AS Cnt FROM myTable) MC

Edit: After downvote and COUNT/OVER answer. A comparison on 2 tables of mine

You can see a huge difference between my CROSS JOIN/simple aggregate and a COUNT/empty ORDER BY clause

SELECT COUNT(*) OVER() AS C, key1col, key2col
FROM myTable

(24717 row(s) affected)

Table 'Worktable'. Scan count 3, logical reads 49865, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'myTable'. Scan count 1, logical reads 77, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.

StmtText
  |--Nested Loops(Inner Join)
       |--Table Spool
       |    |--Segment
       |         |--Index Scan(OBJECT:([MyDB].[dbo].[myTable].[IX_useful]))
       |--Nested Loops(Inner Join, WHERE:((1)))
            |--Compute Scalar(DEFINE:([Expr1003]=CONVERT_IMPLICIT(int,[Expr1005],0)))
            |    |--Stream Aggregate(DEFINE:([Expr1005]=Count(*)))
            |         |--Table Spool
            |--Table Spool

SELECT
    MC.Cnt, M.key1col, M.key2col
FROM
    myTable M
    CROSS JOIN
    (SELECT COUNT(*) AS Cnt FROM myTable) MC

(24717 row(s) affected)

Table 'myTable'. Scan count 2, logical reads 154, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.


StmtText
  |--Nested Loops(Inner Join)
       |--Compute Scalar(DEFINE:([Expr1005]=CONVERT_IMPLICIT(int,[Expr1009],0)))
       |    |--Stream Aggregate(DEFINE:([Expr1009]=Count(*)))
       |         |--Index Scan(OBJECT:([MyDB].[dbo].[myTable].[IX_useful]))
       |--Index Scan(OBJECT:([MyDB].[dbo].[myTable].[IX_useful] AS [M]))

I've repeated this on a table with 570k rows and here is the IO

Table 'Worktable'. Scan count 3, logical reads 1535456, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'myTable'. Scan count 1, logical reads 2929, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.


Table 'myTable'. Scan count 34, logical reads 6438, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
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+1 for pulling all your guns out. I'll have to check out my exec plans. –  Chris Bednarski May 11 '10 at 8:40
    
@Chris Bednarski: I've been bitten before! Also SET STATISTICS TIME ON si useful: CPU is x5 to x10 and duration x2 for the OVER solution for me –  gbn May 11 '10 at 9:49
    
@gbn: I'm now interested to see if there is much difference in performance between 2005 & 2008. It runs like a dog on 2005. –  Chris Bednarski May 11 '10 at 9:55
2  
+1 A related article here sqlservercentral.com/articles/paging/70120 –  Martin Smith Mar 3 '11 at 21:28
1  
By the way on the logical reads front the two figures are not directly comparable. See this answer for details. –  Martin Smith Mar 4 '11 at 14:43

what about

SELECT COUNT(*) OVER() AS C, COLUMN1, COLUMN2
FROM TABLE  

Regarding CROSS JOIN queries
In a heavy INSERT/DELETE environment, the cross join will return incorrect row count.

Try this from multiple connections
connection 1

set nocount on;
drop table dbo.test_table;
GO
create table dbo.test_table
(
    id_field uniqueidentifier not null default(newid()),
    filler char(2000) not null default('a')
);
GO
create unique clustered index idx_id_fld on dbo.test_table(id_field);
GO
while 1 = 1
insert into dbo.test_table default values;

connection 2

select T2.cnt, T1.id_field, T1.filler
from dbo.test_table T1
cross join (select COUNT(*) as cnt from dbo.test_table) T2

select T2.cnt, T1.id_field, T1.filler
from dbo.test_table T1
cross join (select COUNT(*) as cnt from dbo.test_table) T2

select T2.cnt, T1.id_field, T1.filler
from dbo.test_table T1
cross join (select COUNT(*) as cnt from dbo.test_table) T2

Each time, the count of records (@@ROWCOUNT) is different to T2.cnt

In the case of COUNT(*) OVER(), there is only a single table scan and the @@ROWCOUNT is always the same as T2.cnt

Regarding query plans - SQL 2005 SP3 appears to be much weaker at doing COUNT(*) OVER() than SQL 2008 R2. On top of that, it incorrectly reports query costs (I never thought a sub query could cost more than 100% of the entire query).

In a lot of scenarios, the cost of the COUNT(*) OVER() is between 50-75% of the CROSS JOIN

The best case scenario for a cross join would be if there was a very narrow index to do the count on. That way there will be a clustered index scan for the data + an index scan for the count.

As always, it's best to measure, measure, measure and go with the compromise that you're happy to live with.

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I was going to suggest the same(ish) thing –  Joe Philllips May 10 '10 at 5:31
    
+1 for using Analytical function ..... –  Nitin Midha May 10 '10 at 5:33
    
much better than joins, uses a single scan only –  Chris Bednarski May 10 '10 at 5:35
    
This is the preferred method. –  Dave Markle May 10 '10 at 11:06
1  
Have you compared performance to my one? Runs like a dog. It has to spool up the COUNT in a WorkTable –  gbn May 10 '10 at 11:26

You can do this with a CROSS JOIN and CTE, but it's not very efficient:

WITH Rows_CTE AS
(
    SELECT Column1, Column2
    FROM Table
    WHERE (...)
)
SELECT c.Cnt, r.Column1, r.Column2
FROM Rows_CTE r
CROSS JOIN (SELECT COUNT(*) AS Cnt FROM Rows_CTE) c

I think a better way to get what you want would be to use a single query but multiple result sets, which you can do by using COMPUTE:

SELECT Column1, Column2
FROM Table
WHERE (...)
COMPUTE COUNT([Column1])
share|improve this answer
    
Why use a CTE? A simple cross join onto a derived table will do it. And COMPUTE is deprecated too. –  gbn May 9 '10 at 15:48
    
@gbn: I did use a CROSS JOIN. The CTE is so that the predicates can be reused (note the inclusion of WHERE (...), which is missing from the question but probably included in the production environment). And I know COMPUTE is technically deprecated, but ROLLUP can't replace it here and using COMPUTE eliminates an entire table/index scan from the plan. –  Aaronaught May 9 '10 at 16:14
    
Frankly, it's always annoyed me that they deprecated COMPUTE, because it's still the only way to compute aggregates without a GROUP BY clause. But that's a rant for another day. –  Aaronaught May 9 '10 at 16:17
    
I like COMPUTE too. Damn useful. –  gbn May 9 '10 at 16:30

give a try for this query:

select ColumnId,Descr,(select COUNT(*) from ColumnSetUp)as c
from ColumnSetUp
group by ColumnId,Descr
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