Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a table as follows:

mysql> DESCRIBE student_lectures;
+------------------+----------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field            | Type     | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+------------------+----------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| id               | int(11)  | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
| course_module_id | int(11)  | YES  | MUL | NULL    |                |
| day              | int(11)  | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| start            | datetime | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| end              | datetime | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| cancelled_at     | datetime | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| lecture_type_id  | int(11)  | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| lecture_id       | int(11)  | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| student_id       | int(11)  | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| created_at       | datetime | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| updated_at       | datetime | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
+------------------+----------+------+-----+---------+----------------+

I'm essentially wanting to find times when a lecture doesn't happen - so to do this I'm thinking a query to group overlapping lectures together (so, for example, 9am-10am and 10am-11am lectures will be shown as a single 9am-11am lecture). There may be more than two lectures back-to-back.

I've currently got this:

SELECT l.start, l2.end
FROM student_lectures l
LEFT JOIN student_lectures l2 ON ( l2.start = l.end )
WHERE l.student_id = 1 AND l.start >= '2010-04-26 09:00:00' AND l.end <= '2010-04-30 19:00:00' AND l2.end IS NOT NULL AND l2.end != l.start
GROUP BY l.start, l2.end
ORDER BY l.start, l2.start

Which returns:

+---------------------+---------------------+
| start               | end                 |
+---------------------+---------------------+
| 2010-04-26 09:00:00 | 2010-04-26 11:00:00 |
| 2010-04-26 10:00:00 | 2010-04-26 12:00:00 |
| 2010-04-26 10:00:00 | 2010-04-26 13:00:00 |
| 2010-04-26 13:15:00 | 2010-04-26 16:15:00 |
| 2010-04-26 14:15:00 | 2010-04-26 16:15:00 |
| 2010-04-26 15:15:00 | 2010-04-26 17:15:00 |
| 2010-04-26 16:15:00 | 2010-04-26 18:15:00 |
...etc...

The output I'm looking for from this would be:

+---------------------+---------------------+
| start               | end                 |
+---------------------+---------------------+
| 2010-04-26 09:00:00 | 2010-04-26 13:00:00 |
| 2010-04-26 13:15:00 | 2010-04-26 18:15:00 |

Any help appreciated, thanks!

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

Something like this should work.

SELECT l2.start, l.end FROM student_lectures l LEFT JOIN student_lectures l2 ON l2.end BETWEEN l.start AND l.end WHERE l.start BETWEEN '2010-04-26 00:00:00' AND '2010-04-26 23:59:59' GROUP BY l.start ORDER BY l.start

share|improve this answer
    
Does work - but takes 1.8s to execute on my resultset, as opposed to that linked above stackoverflow.com/questions/964288/… –  James Inman May 14 '10 at 19:16
add comment
up vote 0 down vote accepted

ax came up with the best answer I've seen so far to this - that is, http://explainextended.com/2009/06/13/flattening-timespans-mysql/

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.