Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to generate html layout with areas (divs, spans) that can be shown/hidden conditionally. These areas are hidden by default.

If I call .hide method with jquery on document.ready these areas may blink (browsers render partially loaded documents). So I apply "display: none" style in html layout.

I wonder what is the best practice to avoid blinking, because applying "display:none" breaks incapsulation rule - I know what jquery does with hide/show and use it. If jquery's hiding/showing implementation will change one day, I'll get the whole site unworkable.

Thank you in advance

share|improve this question
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's absolutely nothing wrong with setting an intial display property of an element, especially if you encapsulate it in a css class.

share|improve this answer
16  
If you go this way, a browser with disabled javascript will never render these elements –  Stephane May 10 '10 at 8:00
7  
Never, ever, ever, ever. This is bad practice. –  Marko Oct 2 '10 at 22:55
add comment

@Andrew,

I know the answer has already been accepted, but using display: none; will be a nightmare to users without Javascript.

Using inline Javascript, you can hide an element without it ever blinking. Users without Javascript will still be able to see it.

Consider a few divs that should be hidden when the page loads.

<head>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="jQuery.js"></script>
</head>
<body>
    <div id="hide-me">
        ... some content ...
    </div>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        $("#hide-me").hide();
    </script>

    <div id="hide-me-too">
        ... some content ...
    </div>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        $("#hide-me-too").hide();
    </script>
</body>

The inline Javascript will run as soon as the element is rendered, thus hiding it from the user.

share|improve this answer
3  
That this will work <u>without blinking</u> (in all browsers, for any page) is simply untrue... Different browsers, depending on their exact implementation and the size of the page, may end up "blinking" or even displaying the content for a while. EG sample (1 MB) that displays for a while in Chrome: architectshack.com/as/BlinkTest.ashx?2 –  Tao Jun 20 '12 at 22:05
    
Agreed Tao - this does NOT work in some browsers, including Chrome. –  jimasp Jan 6 at 16:06
add comment

I agree with Boris Guéry, that it is not over-engineering, but rather, a standard best practice. I would go a slightly different way than Boris, by adding a no-js class to the html initially and then removing it with JavaScript.

This way you're not waiting for the document to be ready to hide the content, and without any JavaScript you still see the content. Assuming the user has not JavaScript is more in line with the philosophy of progressive enhancement.

ex:

<html class="no-js">
<body>
<div id="foo"></div>
</body>
</html>

my css :

#foo
{
    display: none;
}

html.no-js #foo
{
    display: block;
}

and javascript

$(document).ready(
   function()
   {
     $('html').removeClass('no-js');
   }
);

** OR on a per-case basis****

ex:

<div class="no-js" id="foo">foobar and stuff</div>

css:

.no-js{
  display:none;
}
#foo{
  display: block;
}
#foo.no-js
{
  display: none;
}

js:

$(document).ready(function(){
  // remove the class from any element that has it.
  $('.no-js').removeClass('no-js');
 });
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I really like the idea of this. However using a CMS I can't just edit the html tag. I'm wondering if there is another solution. –  Tom May 2 '13 at 2:42
    
It doesn't need to be the html tag, that's just casts the broadest net. Can you add classes to anything? If so then you can do it on a per-case basis, then in the javascript remove the .no-js class from all objects that have it. I'll update my answer with a suggestion. –  Ryan Ore May 2 '13 at 14:11
    
to get it working, my script file ended up like this, so the removeClass() fires early, and the show() fires late: $('html').removeClass('no-js'); $(function () { $(window).load(function() { $('#foo').show(); }); }); –  jimasp Jan 7 at 10:56
add comment

I usually set a .js class to my element to set the proper property when javascript is enabled.

I then can set the CSS depending on if javascript is present or not.

ex:

<html class="js">
<body>
<div id="foo"></div>
</body>
</html>

my css :

html.js #foo
{
    display: none;
}

and javascript

$(document).ready(
   function()
   {
     $(html).addClass('js');
   }
);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, but i decided to stop my choice on simple-css & found this mixed (css + javascript) approach overengineered for my tasks. –  Andrew Florko May 10 '10 at 7:59
1  
The interest is to keep usability and accessibility for people who doesn't have javascript, if you match your block with its id, it's likely to be hidden for ppl who don't have javascript enabled. You wanted to know best practices, it IS a best practice. –  Boris Guéry May 10 '10 at 8:35
add comment

you can apply "display: none" in a CSS class.

Because the order which a browser have to read some HTML code in order for the JavaScript to find the Element. You have to mark the element hidden, as the browser reads your HTML.

How ever you can also insert the HTML in your JavaScript, and you can call hide before it is rendered.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, i decided to apply "display: none" with CSS –  Andrew Florko May 10 '10 at 7:57
add comment

I would always use Modernizr.js http://modernizr.com/ to handle this.

With Mondernizr a class 'js' or 'no-js' is added to the HTML tag of your page.

From here you can hide your elements only if the html tag has the js class.

Modernizr is great for so many other applications and worth reading up on if you've not used it before: http://modernizr.com/docs/

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.