Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to get Class object from the type variable in Java generic class? Something like that:

public class Bar extends Foo<T> {
    public Class getParameterClass() {
        return T.class; // doesn't compile
    }
}

This type information is available at compile time and therefore should not be affected by type erasure, so, theoretically, there should be a way to accomplish this. Does it exist?

share|improve this question
    
Should your declaration really be public class Bar<T> extends Foo<T> {... ?? –  Kilokahn May 6 '13 at 11:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

This works:

public static class Bar extends Foo<String> {
  public Class<?> getParameterClass() {
    return (Class<?>) (((ParameterizedType)Bar.class.getGenericSuperclass()).getActualTypeArguments()[0]);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1. It simply can't. java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/java/generics/erasure.html –  Roman May 10 '10 at 8:32
3  
@Roman It can't? Simply try it. Downvoting without actually doing so while insisting on your wrong answer is ridiculous anyway. –  sfussenegger May 10 '10 at 8:33
2  
Roman: I suggest you actually try this. Yes, types get erased and cannot be relied on at compile time, but you can use runtime reflection to see what those types are. It comes with a few gotchas, but broadly works. –  GaryF May 10 '10 at 8:34
4  
@GaryF: It's really more the other way round: there is no information about type parameters in instances of generic types, but there is information in compile-time entities such as classes and fields. –  Michael Borgwardt May 10 '10 at 8:41
4  
Alexander, what exactly works? In your example there is a type variable T, while in this snippet it's String instead. You already know that it's String, what the point of all these manipulations? Did you manage to solve the T.class problem mentioned in the question? –  yegor256 Feb 5 '12 at 23:34

The code snippet is a bit confusing. Is T a type parameter or a class?

public static class Bar extends Foo<String> {
    public Class<?> getParameterClass() {
        return (Class<?>) (((ParameterizedType)Bar.class.getGenericSuperclass()).getActualTypeArguments()[0]);
    }
}

public static class Bar2<T> extends Foo<T> {
    public Class<?> getParameterClass() {
        return (Class<?>) (((ParameterizedType)Bar2.class.getGenericSuperclass()).getActualTypeArguments()[0]);
    }
}


public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println(new Bar().getParameterClass());
    System.out.println(new Bar2<Object>().getParameterClass());
}

Actually the second println will cause an exception.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there any way to fix the second one? –  Freewind Jun 9 '11 at 1:21
2  
it's a TypeVariable (thus not castable to Class) and contains T(as in string not class) which says exactly nothing useful. –  durilka Jan 13 '12 at 0:58
1  
The example in the orignal post does not declare T as parameter. Written like this T must be a class... –  tkr Jan 21 '12 at 21:42

This code works for derived classes as well:

import java.lang.reflect.ParameterizedType;

public abstract class A<B> 
{
    public Class<B> getClassOfB() throws Exception 
    {
        ParameterizedType superclass = (ParameterizedType) getClass().getGenericSuperclass();

        return (Class<B>) superclass.getActualTypeArguments()[0];
    }
}

snagged from here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/4699117/26510

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.