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As already discussed in Rtti data manipulation and consistency in Delphi 2010 a consistency between the original data and rtti values can be reached by accessing members by using a pair of TRttiField and an instance pointer. This would be very easy in case of a simple class with only basic member types (like e.g. integers or strings). But what if we have structured field types?

Here is an example:

TIntArray = array [0..1] of Integer;

TPointArray = array [0..1] of Point;

TExampleClass = class
  private
    FPoint : TPoint;
    FAnotherClass : TAnotherClass;
    FIntArray : TIntArray;
    FPointArray : TPointArray;
  public  
    property Point : TPoint read FPoint write FPoint; 
    //.... and so on
end;

For an easy access of Members I want to buil a tree of member-nodes, which provides an interface for getting and setting values, getting attributes, serializing/deserializing values and so on.

TMemberNode = class
  private
    FMember : TRttiMember;
    FParent : TMemberNode;
    FInstance : Pointer;
  public
    property Value : TValue read GetValue write SetValue; //uses FInstance
end;

So the most important thing is getting/setting the values, which is done - as stated before - by using the GetValue and SetValue functions of TRttiField.

So what is the Instance for FPoint members? Let's say Parent is the Node for TExample class, where the instance is known and the member is a field, then Instance would be:

FInstance := Pointer (Integer (Parent.Instance) + TRttiField (FMember).Offset);

But what if I want to know the Instance for a record property? There is no offset in this case. So is there a better solution to get a pointer to the data?

For the FAnotherClass member, the Instance would be:

FInstance := Parent.Value.AsObject;  

So far the solution works, and data manipulation can be done by using rtti or the original types, without losing information.

But things get harder, when working with arrays. Especially the second array of Points. How can I get the instance for the members of points in this case?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

TRttiField.GetValue where the field's type is a value type gets you a copy. This is by design. TValue.MakeWithoutCopy is for managing reference counts on things like interfaces and strings; it is not for avoiding this copy behaviour. TValue is intentionally not designed to mimic Variant's ByRef behaviour, where you can end up with references to (e.g.) stack objects inside a TValue, increasing the risk of stale pointers. It would also be counter-intuitive; when you say GetValue, you should expect a value, not a reference.

Probably the most efficient way to manipulate values of value types when they are stored inside other structures is to step back and add another level of indirection: by calculating offsets rather than working with TValue directly for all the intermediary value typed steps along the path to the item.

This can be encapsulated fairly trivially. I spent the past hour or so writing up a little TLocation record which uses RTTI to do this:

type
  TLocation = record
    Addr: Pointer;
    Typ: TRttiType;
    class function FromValue(C: TRttiContext; const AValue: TValue): TLocation; static;
    function GetValue: TValue;
    procedure SetValue(const AValue: TValue);
    function Follow(const APath: string): TLocation;
    procedure Dereference;
    procedure Index(n: Integer);
    procedure FieldRef(const name: string);
  end;

function GetPathLocation(const APath: string; ARoot: TLocation): TLocation; forward;

{ TLocation }

type
  PPByte = ^PByte;

procedure TLocation.Dereference;
begin
  if not (Typ is TRttiPointerType) then
    raise Exception.CreateFmt('^ applied to non-pointer type %s', [Typ.Name]);
  Addr := PPointer(Addr)^;
  Typ := TRttiPointerType(Typ).ReferredType;
end;

procedure TLocation.FieldRef(const name: string);
var
  f: TRttiField;
begin
  if Typ is TRttiRecordType then
  begin
    f := Typ.GetField(name);
    Addr := PByte(Addr) + f.Offset;
    Typ := f.FieldType;
  end
  else if Typ is TRttiInstanceType then
  begin
    f := Typ.GetField(name);
    Addr := PPByte(Addr)^ + f.Offset;
    Typ := f.FieldType;
  end
  else
    raise Exception.CreateFmt('. applied to type %s, which is not a record or class',
      [Typ.Name]);
end;

function TLocation.Follow(const APath: string): TLocation;
begin
  Result := GetPathLocation(APath, Self);
end;

class function TLocation.FromValue(C: TRttiContext; const AValue: TValue): TLocation;
begin
  Result.Typ := C.GetType(AValue.TypeInfo);
  Result.Addr := AValue.GetReferenceToRawData;
end;

function TLocation.GetValue: TValue;
begin
  TValue.Make(Addr, Typ.Handle, Result);
end;

procedure TLocation.Index(n: Integer);
var
  sa: TRttiArrayType;
  da: TRttiDynamicArrayType;
begin
  if Typ is TRttiArrayType then
  begin
    // extending this to work with multi-dimensional arrays and non-zero
    // based arrays is left as an exercise for the reader ... :)
    sa := TRttiArrayType(Typ);
    Addr := PByte(Addr) + sa.ElementType.TypeSize * n;
    Typ := sa.ElementType;
  end
  else if Typ is TRttiDynamicArrayType then
  begin
    da := TRttiDynamicArrayType(Typ);
    Addr := PPByte(Addr)^ + da.ElementType.TypeSize * n;
    Typ := da.ElementType;
  end
  else
    raise Exception.CreateFmt('[] applied to non-array type %s', [Typ.Name]);
end;

procedure TLocation.SetValue(const AValue: TValue);
begin
  AValue.Cast(Typ.Handle).ExtractRawData(Addr);
end;

This type can be used to navigate locations within values using RTTI. To make it slightly easier to use, and slightly more fun for me to write, I also wrote a parser - the Follow method:

function GetPathLocation(const APath: string; ARoot: TLocation): TLocation;

  { Lexer }

  function SkipWhite(p: PChar): PChar;
  begin
    while IsWhiteSpace(p^) do
      Inc(p);
    Result := p;
  end;

  function ScanName(p: PChar; out s: string): PChar;
  begin
    Result := p;
    while IsLetterOrDigit(Result^) do
      Inc(Result);
    SetString(s, p, Result - p);
  end;

  function ScanNumber(p: PChar; out n: Integer): PChar;
  var
    v: Integer;
  begin
    v := 0;
    while (p >= '0') and (p <= '9') do
    begin
      v := v * 10 + Ord(p^) - Ord('0');
      Inc(p);
    end;
    n := v;
    Result := p;
  end;

const
  tkEof = #0;
  tkNumber = #1;
  tkName = #2;
  tkDot = '.';
  tkLBracket = '[';
  tkRBracket = ']';

var
  cp: PChar;
  currToken: Char;
  nameToken: string;
  numToken: Integer;

  function NextToken: Char;
    function SetToken(p: PChar): PChar;
    begin
      currToken := p^;
      Result := p + 1;
    end;
  var
    p: PChar;
  begin
    p := cp;
    p := SkipWhite(p);
    if p^ = #0 then
    begin
      cp := p;
      currToken := tkEof;
      Exit(currToken);
    end;

    case p^ of
      '0'..'9':
      begin
        cp := ScanNumber(p, numToken);
        currToken := tkNumber;
      end;

      '^', '[', ']', '.': cp := SetToken(p);

    else
      cp := ScanName(p, nameToken);
      if nameToken = '' then
        raise Exception.Create('Invalid path - expected a name');
      currToken := tkName;
    end;

    Result := currToken;
  end;

  function Describe(tok: Char): string;
  begin
    case tok of
      tkEof: Result := 'end of string';
      tkNumber: Result := 'number';
      tkName: Result := 'name';
    else
      Result := '''' + tok + '''';
    end;
  end;

  procedure Expect(tok: Char);
  begin
    if tok <> currToken then
      raise Exception.CreateFmt('Expected %s but got %s', 
        [Describe(tok), Describe(currToken)]);
  end;

  { Semantic actions are methods on TLocation }
var
  loc: TLocation;

  { Driver and parser }

begin
  cp := PChar(APath);
  NextToken;

  loc := ARoot;

  // Syntax:
  // path ::= ( '.' <name> | '[' <num> ']' | '^' )+ ;;

  // Semantics:

  // '<name>' are field names, '[]' is array indexing, '^' is pointer
  // indirection.

  // Parser continuously calculates the address of the value in question, 
  // starting from the root.

  // When we see a name, we look that up as a field on the current type,
  // then add its offset to our current location if the current location is 
  // a value type, or indirect (PPointer(x)^) the current location before 
  // adding the offset if the current location is a reference type. If not
  // a record or class type, then it's an error.

  // When we see an indexing, we expect the current location to be an array
  // and we update the location to the address of the element inside the array.
  // All dimensions are flattened (multiplied out) and zero-based.

  // When we see indirection, we expect the current location to be a pointer,
  // and dereference it.

  while True do
  begin
    case currToken of
      tkEof: Break;

      '.':
      begin
        NextToken;
        Expect(tkName);
        loc.FieldRef(nameToken);
        NextToken;
      end;

      '[':
      begin
        NextToken;
        Expect(tkNumber);
        loc.Index(numToken);
        NextToken;
        Expect(']');
        NextToken;
      end;

      '^':
      begin
        loc.Dereference;
        NextToken;
      end;

    else
      raise Exception.Create('Invalid path syntax: expected ".", "[" or "^"');
    end;
  end;

  Result := loc;
end;

Here's an example type, and a routine (P) that manipulates it:

type
  TPoint = record
    X, Y: Integer;
  end;
  TArr = array[0..9] of TPoint;

  TFoo = class
  private
    FArr: TArr;
    constructor Create;
    function ToString: string; override;
  end;

{ TFoo }

constructor TFoo.Create;
var
  i: Integer;
begin
  for i := Low(FArr) to High(FArr) do
  begin
    FArr[i].X := i;
    FArr[i].Y := -i;
  end;
end;

function TFoo.ToString: string;
var
  i: Integer;
begin
  Result := '';
  for i := Low(FArr) to High(FArr) do
    Result := Result + Format('(%d, %d) ', [FArr[i].X, FArr[i].Y]);
end;

procedure P;
var
  obj: TFoo;
  loc: TLocation;
  ctx: TRttiContext;
begin
  obj := TFoo.Create;
  Writeln(obj.ToString);

  ctx := TRttiContext.Create;

  loc := TLocation.FromValue(ctx, obj);
  Writeln(loc.Follow('.FArr[2].X').GetValue.ToString);
  Writeln(obj.FArr[2].X);

  loc.Follow('.FArr[2].X').SetValue(42);
  Writeln(obj.FArr[2].X); // observe value changed

  // alternate syntax, not using path parser, but location destructive updates
  loc.FieldRef('FArr');
  loc.Index(2);
  loc.FieldRef('X');
  loc.SetValue(24);
  Writeln(obj.FArr[2].X); // observe value changed again

  Writeln(obj.ToString);
end;

The principle can be extended to other types and Delphi expression syntax, or TLocation may be changed to return new TLocation instances rather than destructive self-updates, or non-flat array indexing may be supported, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a very nice solution and it's very similar to what I did - except the parser which I do not need at the moment. But the calculation of offsets is just the same. Thank you Barry for having a look at this topic! –  Christian Metzler May 11 '10 at 13:36
    
Objection (1): This only works with fields, because this depends on the ability to take the address of the field in it's original structure(record/class). Only Fields have actual memory backing them up, Properties do not, so it's a bit limited - not a big problem I admit, especially if this is only supposed to work in one particular application under the developer's control. –  Cosmin Prund May 12 '10 at 5:33
    
... and a +1 from me be because I found out how smart the TValue.Make and the TValue.ExtractRawData really are! They're smart because they handle managed types properly (strings, managed records, interfaces). –  Cosmin Prund May 12 '10 at 6:04
    
@Cosmin - when you're working with properties, you need value semantics, otherwise you'd be working with locations of temporaries. As to the smartness of TValue etc., you're welcome :) –  Barry Kelly May 12 '10 at 11:52

You're touching a few concepts and problems with this question. First of all you've mixed in some record types and some properties, and I'd like to handle this first. Then I'll give you some short info on how to read the "Left" and "Top" fields of a record when that record is part of an field in a class... Then I'll give you suggestions on how to make this work generically. I'm probably going to explain a bit more then it's required, but it's midnight over here and I can't sleep!

Example:

TPoint = record
  Top: Integer;
  Left: Integer;
end;

TMyClass = class
protected
  function GetMyPoint: TPoint;
  procedure SetMyPoint(Value:TPoint);
public
  AnPoint: TPoint;           
  property MyPoint: TPoint read GetMyPoint write SetMyPoint;
end;

function TMyClass.GetMyPoint:Tpoint;
begin
  Result := AnPoint;
end;

procedure TMyClass.SetMyPoint(Value:TPoint);
begin
  AnPoint := Value;
end;

Here's the deal. If you write this code, at runtime it will do what it seems to be doing:

var X:TMyClass;
x.AnPoint.Left := 7;

But this code will not work the same:

var X:TMyClass;
x.MyPoint.Left := 7;

Because that code is equivalent to:

var X:TMyClass;
var tmp:TPoint;

tmp := X.GetMyPoint;
tmp.Left := 7;

The way to fix this is to do something like this:

var X:TMyClass;
var P:TPoint;

P := X.MyPoint;
P.Left := 7;
X.MyPoint := P;

Moving on, you want to do the same with RTTI. You may get RTTI for both the "AnPoint:TPoint" field and for the "MyPoint:TPoint" field. Because using RTTI you're essentially using a function to get the value, you'll need do use the "Make local copy, change, write back" technique with both (the same kind of code as for the X.MyPoint example).

When doing it with RTTI we'll always start from the "root" (a TExampleClass instance, or a TMyClass instance) and use nothing but a series of Rtti GetValue and SetValue methods to get the value of the deep field or set the value of the same deep field.

We'll assume we have the following:

AnPointFieldRtti: TRttiField; // This is RTTI for the AnPoint field in the TMyClass class
LeftFieldRtti: TRttiField; // This is RTTI for the Left field of the TPoint record

We want to emulate this:

var X:TMyClass;
begin
  X.AnPoint.Left := 7;
end;

We'll brake that into steps, we're aiming for this:

var X:TMyClass;
    V:TPoint;
begin
  V := X.AnPoint;
  V.Left := 7;
  X.AnPoint := V;
end;

Because we want to do it with RTTI, and we want it to work with anything, we will not use the "TPoint" type. So as expected we first do this:

var X:TMyClass;
    V:TValue; // This will hide a TPoint value, but we'll pretend we don't know
begin
  V := AnPointFieldRtti.GetValue(X);
end;

For the next step we'll use the GetReferenceToRawData to get a pointer to the TPoint record hidden in the V:TValue (you know, the one we pretend we know nothing about - except the fact it's a RECORD). Once we get a pointer to that record, we can call the SetValue method to move that "7" inside the record.

LeftFieldRtti.SetValue(V.GetReferenceToRawData, 7);

This is allmost it. Now we just need to move the TValue back into X:TMyClass:

AnPointFieldRtti.SetValue(X, V)

From head-to-tail it would look like this:

var X:TMyClass;
    V:TPoint;
begin
  V := AnPointFieldRtti.GetValue(X);
  LeftFieldRtti.SetValue(V.GetReferenceToRawData, 7);
  AnPointFieldRtti.SetValue(X, V);
end;

This can obviously be expanded to handle structures of any depth. Just remember that you need to do it step-by-step: The first GetValue uses the "root" instance, then the next GetValue uses an Instance that's extracted from the previous GetValue result. For records we may use TValue.GetReferenceToRawData, for objects we can use TValue.AsObject!

The next tricky bit is doing this in a generic way, so you can implement your bi-directional tree-like structure. For that, I'd recommend storing the path from "root" to your field in the form of an TRttiMember array (casting will then be used to find the actual runtype type, so we can call GetValue and SetValue). An node would look something like this:

TMemberNode = class
  private
    FMember : array of TRttiMember; // path from root
    RootInstance:Pointer;
  public
    function GetValue:TValue;
    procedure SetValue(Value:TValue);
end;

The implementation of GetValue is very simple:

function TMemberNode.GetValue:TValue;
var i:Integer;    
begin
  Result := FMember[0].GetValue(RootInstance);
  for i:=1 to High(FMember) do
    if FMember[i-1].FieldType.IsRecord then
      Result := FMember[i].GetValue(Result.GetReferenceToRawData)
    else
      Result := FMember[i].GetValue(Result.AsObject);
end;

The implementation of SetValue would be a tiny little bit more involved. Because of those (pesky?) records we'll need to do everything the GetValue routine does (because we need the Instance pointer for the very last FMember element), then we'll be able to call SetValue, but we might need to call SetValue for it's parent, and then for it's parent's parent, and so on... This obviously means we need to KEEP all the intermediary TValue's intact, just in case we need them. So here we go:

procedure TMemberNode.SetValue(Value:TValue);
var Values:array of TValue;
    i:Integer;
begin
  if Length(FMember) = 1 then
    FMember[0].SetValue(RootInstance, Value) // this is the trivial case
  else
    begin
      // We've got an strucutred case! Let the fun begin.
      SetLength(Values, Length(FMember)-1); // We don't need space for the last FMember

      // Initialization. The first is being read from the RootInstance
      Values[0] := FMember[0].GetValue(RootInstance);

      // Starting from the second path element, but stoping short of the last
      // path element, we read the next value
      for i:=1 to Length(FMember)-2 do // we'll stop before the last FMember element
        if FMember[i-1].FieldType.IsRecord then
          Values[i] := FMember[i].GetValue(Values[i-1].GetReferenceToRawData)
        else
          Values[i] := FMember[i].GetValue(Values[i-1].AsObject);

      // We now know the instance to use for the last element in the path
      // so we can start calling SetValue.
      if FMember[High(FMember)-1].FieldType.IsRecord then
        FMember[High(FMember)].SetValue(Values[High(FMember)-1].GetReferenceToRawData, Value)
      else
        FMember[High(FMember)].SetValue(Values[High(FMember)-1].AsObject, Value);

      // Any records along the way? Since we're dealing with classes or records, if
      // something is not a record then it's a instance. If we reach a "instance" then
      // we can stop processing.
      i := High(FMember)-1;
      while (i >= 0) and FMember[i].FieldType.IsRecord do
      begin
        if i = 0 then
          FMember[0].SetValue(RootInstance, Values[0])
        else
          if FMember[i-1].FieldType.IsRecord then
            FMember[i].SetValue(FMember[i-1].GetReferenceToRawData, Values[i])
          else
            FMember[i].SetValue(FMember[i-1].AsObject, Values[i]);
        // Up one level (closer to the root):
        Dec(i)
      end;
    end;
end;

... And this should be it. Now some warnings:

  • DON'T expect this to compile! I actually wrote every single bit of code in this post in the web browser. For technical reasons I had access to the Rtti.pas source file to look up method and field names, but I don't have access to an compiler.
  • I'd be VERY careful with this code, especially if PROPERTIES are involved. A property can be implemented without an backing field, the setter procedure might not do what you expect. You might run into circular references!
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Cosmin for your example. I understand your argument concerning properties, but when dealing with fields, I think this would be an overhead, because very much Rtti stuff has to be done for only getting or setting a value. So what would you say? Is it a good solution to calculate the field offset (like in my example) for accessing record fields? Just think of a large structure and a lot of GetValue calls... The only solution would be then, to store TValues in a TMember and update the structure, before reading on it, just like I wrote on my last post. –  Christian Metzler May 11 '10 at 7:32
1  
If you only need it to work with fields then you may calculate offsets and pointers, but I don't think it's the best option. Using the RTTI is all about flexibility and (in my opinion) not really about access speed: My solution with storing the path to the element works equally well for fields, properties, records, classes, anything out there. If you need to support properties then you clearly need to implement most of my code (if you have a property that returns a record then you absolutely need to call GetValue to get the current copy, change it, then write it back). –  Cosmin Prund May 11 '10 at 7:55
    
Storing TValues in a TMember would work, but doesn't solve much (it saves some heap operations in the generic SetValue routine) but it makes the code not-thread-safe. –  Cosmin Prund May 11 '10 at 7:58

You seem to be misunderstanding the way an instance pointer works. You don't store a pointer to the field, you store a pointer to the class or the record that it's a field of. Object references are pointers already, so no casting is needed there. For records, you need to obtain a pointer to them with the @ symbol.

Once you have your pointer, and a TRttiField object that refers to that field, you can call SetValue or GetValue on the TRttiField, and pass in your instance pointer, and it takes care of all the offset calculations for you.

In the specific case of arrays, GetValue it will give you a TValue that represents an array. You can test this by calling TValue.IsArray if you want. When you have a TValue that represents an array, you can get the length of the array with TValue.GetArrayLength and retrieve the individual elements with TValue.GetArrayElement.

EDIT: Here's how to deal with record members in a class.

Records are types too, and they have RTTI of their own. You can modify them without doing "GetValue, modify, SetValue" like this:

procedure ModifyPoint(example: TExampleClass; newXValue, newYValue: integer);
var
  context: TRttiContext;
  value: TValue;
  field: TRttiField;
  instance: pointer;
  recordType: TRttiRecordType;
begin
  field := context.GetType(TExampleClass).GetField('FPoint');
  //TValue that references the TPoint
  value := field.GetValue(example);
  //Extract the instance pointer to the TPoint within your object
  instance := value.GetReferenceToRawData;
  //RTTI for the TPoint type
  recordType := context.GetType(value.TypeInfo) as TRttiRecordType;
  //Access the individual members of the TPoint
  recordType.GetField('X').SetValue(instance, newXValue);
  recordType.GetField('Y').SetValue(instance, newYValue);
end;

It looks like the part you didn't know about is TValue.GetReferenceToRawData. That will give you a pointer to the field, without you needing to worry about calculating offsets and casting pointers to integers.

share|improve this answer
    
I do understand the idea of the instance pointer. And I do know how to access fields of a record or a class. The reason, why I do this calculation of the instance pointer above is, that the Field FPoint again contains a record. I do not want to first use GetValue for FPoint, then modify it and then again use SetValue to write it back. Therefore I need to know the instance pointer of FPoint. So I can access the values without having to care about the instance of TExampleClass. –  Christian Metzler May 10 '10 at 14:17
    
@Coco: I see. There's still a simpler way. I'll add to my answer. –  Mason Wheeler May 10 '10 at 14:39
    
Unfortunately this does not work as expected. Modifying a Value like this will not affect the original data. The reason for this is, that TValue ALWAYS makes a copy (I tried this before). You can easily prove this by watching the adress of FPoint and and Instance. GetReferenceToRawData does not mean a reference to the original data. Perhaps this is a bug, but if you try my offset calculation, you will get a correct result. –  Christian Metzler May 10 '10 at 15:32
    
@Coco: Wow! I tested it, and you're right. I hadn't noticed that before. That definitely feels like a bug to me. I've filed a bug report at qc.embarcadero.com/wc/qcmain.aspx?d=84500 about this issue. Feel free to vote for it if you'd like to see it fixed. In the meantime, you could probably get around this by using an edited copy of Rtti.pas that overrides GetValue on TRttiRecordField to use TValue.MakeWithoutCopy instead of TValue.Make. (Embarcadero officially does not recommend modifying the RTL. But I'm not with Embarcadero.) ;) –  Mason Wheeler May 10 '10 at 16:31
    
It's not an bug, it's just asking too much from TValue. If in place of TValue you had an Integer, and you changed it, would you expect the original Integer to be changed? Working this closely with the RTTI brings you very closely to compiler theory: TValue is a "RValue", it's something you get on the right hand side of assignment operations. It's not supposed to know or care where it came from, if it was made using a constant, if it's the result of a function or the valu returned by GetValue! –  Cosmin Prund May 10 '10 at 19:45

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