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I am trying to sort an array of strings, but it's not sorting anything.... what am I doing wrong?

string namesS[MAX_NAMES];

int compare (const void * a, const void * b){
    return ( *(char*)a - *(char*)b );
}


void sortNames(){

    qsort(namesS, MAX_NAMES, sizeof(string), compare);
}
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1  
Are you considering only the first letter of the strings? –  Kasturi May 10 '10 at 13:52
9  
"what am I doing wrong?" Using qsort, treating string as a char *... –  Daniel Daranas May 10 '10 at 13:53
1  
Your compare function tries to cast a string to a char *. That's definitely not a sane thing to do. –  David Schwartz Dec 29 '12 at 4:49
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6 Answers

up vote 27 down vote accepted

This is C++, not C. Sorting an array of strings is easy.

#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

std::vector<std::string> stringarray;
std::sort(stringarray.begin(), stringarray.end());
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1  
Note that you can use std::sort on an array too (but std::vector is a better idea): std::sort(namesS, namesS+MAX_NAMES); –  Fred Larson May 10 '10 at 14:05
    
thanks this worked –  user69514 May 10 '10 at 14:06
1  
This is convenient but will not handle case sensitivity. Uppercase W will come before Lowercase a. –  Miek Aug 23 '12 at 21:06
    
If you want case sensitivity, you need a serious Unicode algorithm and library. –  Puppy Aug 28 '12 at 6:23
2  
Not exactly, you can pass a custom compare function or functor to std::sort and do a case-insensitive comparison there. –  rmhartog Aug 28 '13 at 10:16
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std::qsort is inherited from the standard C library. It will not work.

You need to use std::sort for sorting strings.

Specifically, cast std::string to void* and then to char* is undefined and won't work.

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3  
" It will not work." It can be made to work. That's not to say it should be made to work. –  John Dibling May 10 '10 at 15:44
    
@JohnDibling: qsort only works with blitable (trivially copyable) types, which std::string is not. –  Ben Voigt May 20 at 22:17
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algorithm sort in CPP has the same complexity as qsort:

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

bool compare(string a, string b){
    cout << "compare(" << a << "," << b << ")" << endl;
    return (a.compare(b) < 0);
}

int main () {

    string mystrs[] = {"www","ggg","bbb","ssss","aaa"};
    vector<string> myvector (mystrs, mystrs + 5);               
    vector<string>::iterator it;

  sort (myvector.begin(), myvector.end(), compare);

  cout << "vector contains:";
  for (it=myvector.begin(); it!=myvector.end(); ++it)
    cout << " " << *it;

  cout << endl;

  return 0;
}
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You can use boost::sort, like this:

#include <vector>
#include <boost/range/algorithm.hpp>

std::vector<std::string> stringarray;
boost::sort(stringarray);

If you want use find use boost::find, like this:

std::string findme;
auto offset = boost::find(stringarray, findme) - stringarray.begin()

See 2 useful functions (m_stringarray should be member of ClassA):

const size_t ClassA::GetIdByName(std::string name) const
{
    return (boost::find(this->m_stringarray, name) - this->m_stringarray.begin());
}

const std::string ClassA::GetNameById(size_t id) const
{
    return this->m_stringarray[id];
}
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As many here have stated, you could use std::sort to sort, but what is going to happen when you, for instance, want to sort from z-a? This code may be useful

bool cmp(string a, string b)
{
if(a.compare(b) > 0)
    return true;
else
    return false;
}

int main()
{
string words[] = {"this", "a", "test", "is"};
int length = sizeof(words) / sizeof(string);
sort(words, words + length, cmp);

for(int i = 0; i < length; i++)
    cout << words[i] << " ";
cout << endl;
    // output will be: this test is a 

}

If you want to reverse the order of sorting just modify the sign in the cmp function.

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The body of cmp can be just return a < b;, which is also easy to reverse. One can also avoid implementing a custom cmp and just pass either std::less<std::string>() or std::greater<std::string>() to std::sort –  Ben Voigt May 20 at 22:18
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use strcmp function, check this link http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cstring/strcmp/ int strcmp ( const char * str1, const char * str2 );

Returns an integral value indicating the relationship between the strings: A zero value indicates that both strings are equal. A value greater than zero indicates that the first character that does not match has a greater value in str1 than in str2; And a value less than zero indicates the opposite.

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