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Is it safe to access asp.net session variables through static properties of a static object?

Here is what I mean:

public static class SessionHelper
{
    public static int Age
    {
        get
        {
            return (int)HttpContext.Current.Session["Age"];
        }

        set
        {
            HttpContext.Current.Session["Age"] = value;
        }
    }


    public static string Name
    {
        get
        {
            return (string)HttpContext.Current.Session["Name"];
        }

        set
        {
            HttpContext.Current.Session["Name"] = value;
        }
    }
}

Is it possible that userA could access userB's session data this way?

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HttpContext.Current gets the context from the Thread.CurrentThread, in case you were wondering how it worked. –  Greg May 10 '10 at 16:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Yes, that way is fine - just make sure you don't do this:

public static class SessionHelper
{

    private static HttpSession sess = HttpContext.Current.Session;
    public static int Age
    {
        get
        {
            return (int)sess["Age"];
        }

        set
        {
            sess["Age"] = value;
        }
    }
}

As ive seen this way show one user's session data to another user. (Albeit in ASP.NET 1.1)

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1  
+1 That is a huge pain waiting to happen. –  Greg May 10 '10 at 16:16
1  
I went through this huge pain using ASP.NET MVC 3 (.NET 4.0) running on IIS 6.0. The cross-session contamination only happened under heavy load so it was tough to diagnose. Apparently it still happens even in later versions. –  Mark W Dickson Oct 16 '13 at 16:26
    
Why does that happen? Does the static HttpSession variable leak between sessions because it and the class are static (and thus an instance might be reused between sessions)? –  benedikt Nov 6 at 12:22
1  
@benedikt - because a static variable is shared across the whole process –  Jamiec Nov 6 at 12:50

IMHO, this is actually a good approach. It is type safe, add that level abstraction that could allow you to change things with minimal impact.

An example of something you might change, if you decided some state should move to the cache or even the database combined with caching, these would require additional thread synchronization, but could all be handled by the internals of this class. You might consider changing name of the class to something less session specific.

The one comment I would have on your particular example is that you should check that the Session variable is not null and either return an appropriate default, assert or raise an informative exception if it is. Just in case the property is read before it is being set.

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