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I have 3 versions of Visual Studio installed, and 3 projects that require a specific version. VSLauncher USED to look at the SLN or VCPROJ file and open the correct version of Visual Studio. Now it only starts the most recent version, regardless of the project.

Note that this has nothing to do with the commonly reported problem with beta versions of VS. none of the SLNs have ever been touched by a beta VS.

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In what order did you install the different versions? –  Oded May 10 '10 at 17:15
    
In order. 2005, then 2008, then 2010. I /think/ it was after that the 2010 version was installed that the trouble started, but I am not sure. it has been a while since I worked in the 2005 project –  Matthew Scouten May 10 '10 at 17:24
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3 Answers

I had this same issue. VS 2008 solutions opening in VS2010 when double clicked. This problem went away after first going into VS 2008 and using 'Restore File Associations' then right clicking on a 2008 solution file and choosing open with and pointing it to Version Selector. Prior to this they invariably opened in 2010. Very frustrating. Hope this helps.

Tools | Options | Environment | (big button marked Restore File Associations
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Where in the labyrinth is "Restore File Associations"? –  Jive Dadson Sep 8 '12 at 22:26
    
Funnily enough this restored the double click from explorer but not the 'from TFS'. Thanks Anyway –  Preet Sangha May 13 '13 at 0:30
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up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem was that the SLN files where subtly corrupted. Deleting the files and letting the appropriate version of VS recreate them resulted and a file that the diff tool thought was identical, but was exactly 3 bytes longer. I suspect the problem can be traced to a missing UTF-8 Byte Order Mark. (Why VSLauncher is that picky is another question.)

ADD: Yes, After opening the new file in a hex editor, I can say for certain that the problem was a missing BOM on the old file. This was tricky to spot because my diff tool apparently does not even see the BOM

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I had the exact same problem after manually editing a .sln file. The BOM was corrupted and the culprit was Textpad. Used Notepad instead which worked fine. –  Adam Feb 12 at 9:56
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I also found, in Windows 7 Explorer, that I could right-click the sln, select Open with / Choose default program, then select Microsoft Visual Studio Version Selector - it would open with VS2008 (as was appropriate) and from then on, double-clicking the sln file would cause VS2008 to launch.

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