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I've been working on a piece of software where I need to generate a custom XML file to send back to a client application. The current solutions on Ruby/Rails world for generating XML files are slow, at best. Using builder or event Nokogiri, while have a nice syntax and are maintainable solutions, they consume too much time and processing.

I definetly could go to ERB, which provides a good speed at the expense of building the whole XML by hand.

HAML is a great tool, have a nice and straight-forward syntax and is fairly fast. But I'm struggling to build pure XML files using it. Which makes me wonder, is it possible at all?

Does any one have some pointers to some code or docs showing how to do this, build a full, valid XML from HAML?

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up vote 35 down vote accepted

Doing XML in HAML is easy, just start off your template with:

!!! XML

which produces

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8' ?>

Then as @beanish said earlier, you "make up your own tags":

%test
  %test2 hello
  %item{:name => "blah"}

to get

<test>
  <test2>hello</test2>
  <item name='blah'></item>
</test>

More: http://haml.info/docs/yardoc/file.REFERENCE.html#doctype_

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%test
  %test2 hello
  %item{:name => "blah"}

run it through haml

haml hamltest.haml test.xml

open the file in a browser

<test>
  <test2>hello</test2>
  <item name='blah'></item>
</test>

The HAML reference talks about html tags and gives some examples. HAML reference

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This demonstrates some things that could use useful for xml documents:

!!! XML
%root{'xmlns:foo' => 'http://myns'}
  -# Note: :dashed-attr is invalid syntax
  %dashed-tag{'dashed-attr' => 'value'} Text
  %underscore_tag Text
  - ['apple', 'orange', 'pear'].each do |fruit|
    - haml_tag(fruit, "Yummy #{fruit.capitalize}!", 'fruit-code' => fruit.upcase)
  %foo:nstag{'foo:nsattr' => 'value'}

Output:

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8' ?>
<root xmlns:foo='http://myns'>
  <dashed-tag dashed-attr='value'>Text</dashed-tag>
  <underscore_tag>Text</underscore_tag>
  <apple fruit-code='APPLE'>Yummy Apple!</apple>
  <orange fruit-code='ORANGE'>Yummy Orange!</orange>
  <pear fruit-code='PEAR'>Yummy Pear!</pear>
  <foo:nstag foo:nsattr='value'></foo:nstag>
</root>

Look at the Haml::Helpers link on the haml reference for more methods like haml_tag.

If you want to use double-quotes for attributes,

See: http://stackoverflow.com/a/967065/498594

Or outside of rails use:

>> Haml::Engine.new("%tag{:name => 'value'}", :attr_wrapper => '"').to_html
=> "<tag name=\"value\"></tag>\n"
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Maybe I'm missing something, but what would be so different about using haml for xml as opposed to html?

You say you're struggling, but what are you struggling with? Could you post some sample code?

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Haml can produce XML just as easily as HTML (I've used it for FBML and XHTML). What problems are you having?

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I've not used HAML, but if you can't make it work another option is Builder.

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Builder kind of sucks by comparison to Haml. IMHO it's the single most pointless thing in the Rails ecosystem. – Marnen Laibow-Koser Oct 12 '11 at 19:43

It should be possible. After all you can create plain old XML with Notepad.

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What is your logic? Notepad is an interactive text editor. HAML is an automated markup generator. What's the connection? – James A. Rosen May 10 '10 at 20:46
    
I think he's just saying that there's absolutely nothing fancy about XML whatsoever. – Matchu May 11 '10 at 1:29

what about creating the xml header, e.g. <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> ?

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Haml can do that with !!! XML. And if it couldn't, you could include it as plain text. – Marnen Laibow-Koser Sep 6 '11 at 5:02

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