Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a spring/jdbc/oracle 10g application. The Oracle server database timezone is set to GMT + 2 JVM timezone is GMT + 2 (even though it doesn't matter in my case).

I have a stored procedure that performs some date operations. The problem is that session timezone is different(GMT) than database timezone even though I do not set session timezone explicit in my code/configuration.

As far as I know the session timezone is by default equal to database timezone. Any idea why is the session timezone different than database timezone or how can I configure it in spring configuration (org.apache.commons.dbcp.BasicDataSource) ?

Thank you.

share|improve this question
1  
Which session do you mean? Oracle connection session, or HTTP session? The former, I assume? –  skaffman May 10 '10 at 20:24
    
This solve your problem? I need to do the same on MySQL and I'm still looking for how to do it! –  rafa.ferreira May 11 '11 at 20:40
    
I have questions/posts that stay in this DEAD mode!! No answers, no confirmations, no speculations!! –  rafa.ferreira May 12 '11 at 14:31
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The correct way is to use DelegatingDataSource, retrieve OracleConnection object from the original data source and call OracleConnection.setSessionTimeZone() with the appropriate parameter.

C3P0 code looks like:

private Object[] timeZoneArgs = new Object[] { "Europe/Berlin" };

@Override
public Connection getConnection() throws SQLException {
    Connection conn = super.getConnection();
    try {
        final Method setSessionTimeZoneMethod = OracleConnection.class.getMethod("setSessionTimeZone", String.class);
        final C3P0ProxyConnection castCon = (C3P0ProxyConnection) conn;
        castCon.rawConnectionOperation(setSessionTimeZoneMethod, C3P0ProxyConnection.RAW_CONNECTION, timeZoneArgs);
        return conn;
    } catch (Exception e) {
        log.error("setSessionTimeZone failed " + e.getMessage());
        return conn;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

I solved this problem by upgrading Oracle's JDBC drivers from v10.2.0.1.0 to v11.2.0.3. No changes to my java code were required.

Source: Spring forums.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.