Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Something like the following:

ref example:

void changeString(ref String str) {
    str = "def";
}

void main() {
    String abc = "abc";
    changeString(ref abc);
    System.out.println(abc); //prints "def"
}

out example:

void setString(out String str) {
    str = "def";
}

void main() {
    String abc;
    changeString(out abc);
    System.out.println(abc); //prints "def"
}
share|improve this question
1  
possible duplicate of Can I pass parameters by reference in Java? –  Robert Harvey May 10 '10 at 21:24
    
Maybe for ref, not for out. –  devoured elysium May 10 '10 at 21:24
1  
IMO you're not missing much. The only time I ever use ref or out in C# is when I am using a pattern like TryParse(), where the method returns a boolean result, and the only way to get a parsed value out of it is by using ref or out. –  Robert Harvey May 10 '10 at 21:40
1  
Guess what, that is right what I need to use! ;) –  devoured elysium May 10 '10 at 21:44
1  
Yes. But it's ugly and awkward. –  devoured elysium May 11 '10 at 12:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 30 down vote accepted

No, Java doesn't have something like C#'s ref and out keywords for passing by reference.

You can only pass by value in Java. Even references are passed by value. See Jon Skeet's page about parameter passing in Java for more details.

To do something similar to ref or out you would have to wrap your parameters inside another object and pass that object reference in as a parameter.

share|improve this answer
    
And there's nothing like out? –  devoured elysium May 10 '10 at 21:26
3  
This should be expanded on some. You can only pass primitives (int, short, char, etc.) as value. And no, there is no out. –  Corey Sunwold May 10 '10 at 21:26
4  
That is not 100% true, If you pass in an array or a class the reference to the array or object is passed in by value, You can change internals to the array or object and it will be reflected in the caller. –  Romain Hippeau May 10 '10 at 21:27
7  
@fearofawhackplanet: Um, unless you use ref. –  Robert Harvey May 10 '10 at 21:41
4  
From CLR perspective, you're passing a managed reference (T&) by value, yes. But C# has its own terminology, and it specifically doesn't include such things as values of type ref T - from C# perspective, ref is strictly a parameter modifier, and speaking of "passing a reference by value" with respect to it doesn't make sense. –  Pavel Minaev May 10 '10 at 22:36

Direct answer : No

But you can simulate reference with wrappers

And do the following:

void changeString( _<String> str ) {
    str.s("def");
}

void testRef() {
     _<String> abc = new _<String>("abc");
     changeString( abc );
     out.println( abc ); // prints def
}

Out

void setString( _<String> ref ) {
    str.s( "def" );
}
void testOut(){
    _<String> abc = _<String>();
    setString( abc );
    out.println(abc); // prints def 
}

And basically any other type such as:

_<Integer> one = new <Integer>(1);
addOneTo( one );

out.println( one ); // may print 2
share|improve this answer
4  
My head hurts... –  Robert Harvey May 10 '10 at 21:47
4  
Ouch. That's ugly. –  devoured elysium May 10 '10 at 22:15
9  
I never said, You can do it in this elegant way :P –  OscarRyz May 11 '10 at 14:57
    
so why does the following not work: private static void ParseLine(String newline, String[] aWrapper, Integer[] bWrapper) { StringTokenizer st = new StringTokenizer(newline); aWrapper[0] = st.nextToken(); bWrapper[0]= new Integer(st.nextToken()); } ParseLine(newline, new String[] {a}, new Integer[] {b}); –  Elad Benda Dec 31 '10 at 9:37
1  
@user311130 Your code is hard to read, but you could create a new question saying something like: "I found this answer <link to my answer> but the following doesn't work <your code here> –  OscarRyz Dec 31 '10 at 15:23

Java passes parameters by value, and has no mechanism to allow pass-by-reference. That means that whenever a parameter is passed, its value is copied into the stack frame handling the call.

The term value as I use it here needs a little clarification; In Java we have 2 kinds of variables - primitives and objects. A value of a primitive is the primitive itself, and the value of an object is its reference (and not the state of the object being referenced). Therefore, any change to the value inside the method will only change the copy of the value in the stack, and will not be seen by the caller. For example, there is no way to implement a real swap method, that receives 2 references and swaps them (not their content!).

share|improve this answer

Like many others, I needed to convert a c# project to Java. I did not find a complete solution on the web regarding OUT and REF modifiers. But, I was able to take the information I found, and expand upon it to create my own classes to fulfill the requirements. I wanted to make a distinction between REF and OUT parameters for code clarity. With the below classes, it is possible. May this information save others time and effort.

An example is included in the code below.

//*******************************************************************************************
//XOUT CLASS
//*******************************************************************************************
public class XOUT<T>
{
       public XOBJ<T> Obj = null;
       public XOUT(T value) 
       {
           Obj = new XOBJ<T>(value);
       }
       public XOUT() 
       {
         Obj = new XOBJ<T>();
       }  
       public XOUT<T> Out()
       {
           return(this);           
       }
       public XREF<T> Ref()
       {
           return(Obj.Ref());       
       }

};

//*******************************************************************************************
//XREF CLASS
//*******************************************************************************************

public class XREF<T>
{
       public XOBJ<T> Obj = null;
       public XREF(T value) 
       {
           Obj = new XOBJ<T>(value);
       }
       public XREF() 
       {
         Obj = new XOBJ<T>();
       }  
       public XOUT<T> Out()
       {
           return(Obj.Out());       
       }
       public XREF<T> Ref()
       {
           return(this);
       }       
};

//*******************************************************************************************
//XOBJ CLASS
//*******************************************************************************************
/**
 *
 * @author jsimms
 */
 /*
 XOBJ is the base object that houses the value. XREF and XOUT are classes that
 internally use XOBJ. The classes XOBJ, XREF, and XOUT have methods that allow the object to be
 used as XREF or XOUT parameter; This is important, because objects of these types are 
 interchangeable.

 See Method:
    XXX.Ref()
    XXX.Out()


 The below example shows how to use XOBJ,XREF, and XOUT;  
 //
 // reference parameter example
 //
 void AddToTotal(int a, XREF<Integer> Total)
 {
    Total.Obj.Value += a;
 }
 //
 // out parameter example
 //
 void Add(int a, int b, XOUT<Integer> ParmOut)
 {
    ParmOut.Obj.Value = a+b;
 }
 // 
 // XOBJ example
 //
 int XObjTest()
 {
    XOBJ<Integer> Total = new XOBJ<>(0);    
    Add(1,2,Total.Out());      // example of using out parameter
    AddToTotal(1,Total.Ref()); // example of using ref parameter
    return(Total.Value);
 }
 */


public class XOBJ<T> {

    public T Value;

    public  XOBJ() {

    }    
    public XOBJ(T value) {
        this.Value = value;
    }
    //
    // Method: Ref()
    // Purpose: returns a Reference Parameter object using the XOBJ value
    //    
    public XREF<T> Ref()
    {
        XREF<T> ref = new XREF<T>();
        ref.Obj = this;
        return(ref);
    }
    //
    // Method: Out()
    // Purpose: returns an Out Parameter Object using the XOBJ value
    //
    public XOUT<T> Out()
    {
        XOUT<T> out = new XOUT<T>();
        out.Obj = this;
        return(out);
    }    
    //
    // Method get()
    // Purpose: returns the value 
    // Note: Because this is combersome to edit in the code,
    // the Value object has been made public
    //    
    public T get() {
        return Value;
    }
    //
    // Method get()
    // Purpose: sets the value
    // Note: Because this is combersome to edit in the code,
    // the Value object has been made public
    //
    public void set(T anotherValue) {
        Value = anotherValue;
    }


    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return Value.toString();
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        return Value.equals(obj);
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        return Value.hashCode();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.