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public static void main(String[] args) {
    int x = 1 + + + + + + + + + 2;
    System.out.println(x);
}

I can compile above method. Is there any explanation about the allowed multiple "+" operator?

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I think it just treat all of the + as 1 only. What is the output? –  vodkhang May 11 '10 at 4:08
    
Wow, I had to compile that myself before I believed it. I have no idea why that works. –  Mitch Dempsey May 11 '10 at 4:08
    
@vodkhang - The output is 3 –  Mitch Dempsey May 11 '10 at 4:09
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6 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

It's addition, then the unary plus operator repeated. It's equivalent to the following:

int x = 1 + (+ (+ (+ (+ (+ (+ (+ (+ 2))))))));
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The reason is that + can act as a unary operator, similar to how - can be the negation operator. You are just chaining a bunch of unary operators together (with one final binary addition).

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it evaluates to 1 + (+ ... (+(+(+2))) ... ) = 1 + 2 = 3

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I think they treated all those plus as the same one +. Because the output is 3, so there is no magic here at all

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you do not get any exceptions, it works fine. You will get output 3.

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Its because though syntactically it may seem wrong use of '+' but there is this unary operation is repeating itself.

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