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I have a Tomcat Application Server that is configured to create a memory dump on OOM, and it is started with -Xmx1024M, so a Gigabyte should be available to him.

Now I found one such dump and it contains only 260MB of unretained memory. How is it possible that the dump is so much smaller than the size he should have available?

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Is the Out Of Memory exception for Heap Space or for PermGen space? –  Affe May 11 '10 at 5:34
    
+1 @Affe: Good question. For some reason the exception didn't make it to the logfile, I have to investigate this, too. Does the xprof dump also contain information about the loaded classes, or just information about the objects on the heap? –  Daniel May 11 '10 at 7:27
    
@affe: You were right, it is a PermGen error (found it in my logs this morning again). Please add this add an answer, so i can accept it. –  Daniel May 14 '10 at 7:50

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Permgen space is managed independently of the heap and can run out even when there's plenty of free memory overall. Some web frameworks (especially JSF) are real hogs and while easily cause the default config to run out. It can be increased with -XX:MaxPermSize=###m

Remember the system space is constrained by the sum of heap and permgen, so you can consume fewer total resources before you start getting the Cannot Create Native Thread OOM exception if you don't decrease heap by the amount PermGen is increased.

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Only information about the usage of allocated memory will be dumped to a file. A heap dump isn't a binary image of your heap, it contains information about data types etc. and may exceed your available memory.

Text (classic) Heapdump file format

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+1 Correct, I know, but how can it be that it is approx. just 25% of the size of the available memory? –  Daniel May 11 '10 at 7:28
    
@Daniel for bigger objects the representation in the heapdump will be tiny compared to their actual memory allocation. –  stacker May 11 '10 at 8:39
    
Why should this be? I know objects are aligned to 8 bytes, but this is no explanation for the great difference. –  Daniel May 11 '10 at 10:07

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