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I make some Ajax calls from inside a javascript object.:

myObject.prototye = {
  ajax: function() {
    this.foo = 1;

    var req = new XMLHttpRequest();
    req.open('GET', url, true);
    req.onreadystatechange = function (aEvt) {  
      if (req.readyState == 4) {  
        if(req.status == 200)  {
          alert(this.foo); // reference to this is lost
        }
      }
  }
};

Inside the onreadystatechange function, this does not refer to the main object anymore, so I don't have access to this.foo. Ho can I keep the reference to the main object inside XMLHttpRequest events?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The most simple approach is usually to store the value of this on a local variable:

myObject.prototype = {
  ajax: function (url) { // (url argument missing ?)
    var instance = this; // <-- store reference to the `this` value
    this.foo = 1;

    var req = new XMLHttpRequest();
    req.open('GET', url, true);
    req.onreadystatechange = function (aEvt) {  
      if (req.readyState == 4) {  
        if (req.status == 200)  {
          alert(instance.foo); // <-- use the reference
        }
      }
    };
  }
};

I suspect also that your myObject identifier is really a constructor function (you are assigning a prototype property).

If that's the case don't forget to include the right constructor property (since you are replacing the entire prototype), which is simply a reference back to the constructor.

Maybe off-topic to this issue but recommended to read:

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An other simple solution is to bind your onreadystatechange function to this. bind -ing the function does essentially the same thing as in CMS's answer (that is, adding the value to the closure), but bind does it in a transparent way: you keep using this instead of setting a instance variable.

Here is a Function#bind implementation if your code base doesn't include one :

Function.prototype.bind = function(obj) {
    var __method = this;
    var args = []; for(var i=1; i<arguments.length; i++) args.push(arguments[i]);
    return function() {
        var args2 = []; for(var i=0; i<arguments.length; i++) args2.push(arguments[i]);
        return __method.apply(obj, args.concat(args2));
    };
}

And here is how you can use it in your code :

myObject.prototype = {
  ajax: function() {
    this.foo = 1;

    var req = new XMLHttpRequest();
    req.open('GET', url, true);
    req.onreadystatechange = function (aEvt) {  
      if (req.readyState == 4) {  
        if(req.status == 200)  {
          alert(this.foo); // reference to this is *kept*
        }
      }
    }.bind(this) // <- only change
  }
};
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I would strongly recommend to check if the Function.prototype.bind method exists before creating it, because it is part of the ECMAScript 5th Edition Standard and it is being implemented by all major browser vendors, soon a native implementation will be available and you don't want to override it with your own: WebKit, Mozilla, Google V8. –  CMS May 11 '10 at 20:34
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