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I am trying to use time() to measure various points of my program.

What I don't understand is why the values in the before and after are the same? I understand this is not the best way to profile my program, I just want to see how long something take.

printf("**MyProgram::before time= %ld\n", time(NULL));

doSomthing();
doSomthingLong();

printf("**MyProgram::after time= %ld\n", time(NULL));

I have tried:

struct timeval diff, startTV, endTV;

gettimeofday(&startTV, NULL); 

doSomething();
doSomethingLong();

gettimeofday(&endTV, NULL); 

timersub(&endTV, &startTV, &diff);

printf("**time taken = %ld %ld\n", diff.tv_sec, diff.tv_usec);

How do I read a result of **time taken = 0 26339? Does that mean 26,339 nanoseconds = 26.3 msec?

What about **time taken = 4 45025, does that mean 4 seconds and 25 msec?

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6  
I don't understand the question. Of course the values are different. Time passed in between, so time() returns a different value. –  Thomas May 11 '10 at 6:07
1  
What do you mean "I don't understand is why the values in the before and after are Different"? You're getting the current time (in seconds since Jan 1, 1970) using time(NULL) ... the second time you call it will be N seconds after the first and thus ... different (unless whatever it is you're doing doesn't take a second to complete ... in which case, it'll be the same as the first). –  Brian Roach May 11 '10 at 6:12
1  
Can you tell us what it prints, and how long it takes if you time it with a stopwatch or a wall clock (or a calendar)? –  Matt Curtis May 11 '10 at 6:21
1  
Sorry, I mean both values are the SAME. I mis-type my question. –  hap497 May 11 '10 at 6:25
2  
See this thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/275004/… –  Default May 11 '10 at 6:31

12 Answers 12

#include <ctime>

void f() {
  using namespace std;
  clock_t begin = clock();

  code_to_time();

  clock_t end = clock();
  double elapsed_secs = double(end - begin) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
}

The time() function is only accurate to within a second, but there are CLOCKS_PER_SEC "clocks" within a second. This is an easy, portable measurement, even though it's over-simplified.

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18  
Be aware that clock() measures CPU time, not actual time elapsed (which may be much greater). –  jlstrecker Jan 16 '13 at 20:50
    
When programming parallel code for clusters, this method doesn't reflect the real-world time... –  Nicholas Hamilton Oct 1 '13 at 6:57

As I can see from your question, it looks like you want to know the elapsed time after execution of some piece of code. I guess you would be comfortable to see the results in second(s). If so, try using difftime() function as shown below. Hope this solves your problem.

#include <time.h>
time_t start,end;
time (&start);
.
.
.
<your code>
.
.
.
time (&end);
double dif = difftime (end,start);
printf ("Elasped time is %.2lf seconds.", dif );
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This always gives me integer seconds. Is that supposed to happen? –  sodiumnitrate Sep 15 at 1:55

With C++11 and the help of a class template and lambda functions (when needed) you could abstract the time measuring mechanism. Then each callable would have its run time measured with minimal extra code, just by being called throught the measure structure. Plus, at compile time you can parametrize the time type (milliseconds, nanoseconds etc)

#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>

template<typename TimeT = std::chrono::milliseconds>
struct measure
{
    template<typename F>
    static typename TimeT::rep execution(F const &func)
    {
        auto start = std::chrono::system_clock::now();
        func();
        auto duration = std::chrono::duration_cast< TimeT>(
            std::chrono::system_clock::now() - start);
        return duration.count();
    }
};

int main()
{
    std::cout << measure<>::execution( [&]() {  
        std::cout << "In lambda, run for ";
    }) << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

Live example

Update

A version of the above design, after being reviewed by Loki Astari is the following :

template<typename TimeT = std::chrono::milliseconds>
struct measure
{
    template<typename F, typename ...Args>
    static typename TimeT::rep execution(F func, Args&&... args)
    {
        auto start = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

        // Now call the function with all the parameters you need.
        func(std::forward<Args>(args)...);

        auto duration = std::chrono::duration_cast< TimeT> 
                            (std::chrono::system_clock::now() - start);

        return duration.count();
    }
};
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+1 - Nice example of how <chrono> works in C++11 –  Seth Mar 10 at 6:07
1  
Nice; I have something similar in my code, but use a different interface to the class: I have a class (code_timer) that takes the start time (std::chrono::system_clock::now();) in the constructor, a method code_timer::ellapsed that measures the difference between a new now() call and the one in the constructor, and a code_timer::reset method that resets the start time to a new now() result. To measure the execution of a functor in my code, I use a free function, outside the class. This allows for measuring time from the construction of an object, to the finish of an asynch call. –  utnapistim May 7 at 8:19
    
@utnapistim Thnx, I've asked a review on this code, you can check it here. If you have the time, there you could also elaborate a bit more on your design, it sounds great. –  Nikos Athanasiou May 8 at 5:01
    
Watch out for compiler optimization! I've tried something like this before and the compiler optimized the call to func away since it did not have side effects and the return value was not used. –  Baum mit Augen Jun 28 at 17:50
    
@BaummitAugen You misread the comments on that. It's when using inlined timer machinery (as in Edward's answer) that non observable behaviour gets optimized away. The function call placed as is won't be moved by the compiler. –  Nikos Athanasiou Jun 28 at 17:56

Windows only: (The Linux tag was added after I posted this answer)

You can use GetTickCount() to get the number of milliseconds that have elapsed since the system was started.

long int before = GetTickCount();

// Perform time-consuming operation

long int after = GetTickCount();
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3  
I am using it on linux. So I can't use the GetTickCount() function. –  hap497 May 11 '10 at 6:26
    
already never mind ;) Thanks for updating the tag of your post –  RvdK May 11 '10 at 7:42
#include<time.h> // for clock
#include<math.h> // for fmod
#include<cstdlib> //for system
#include <stdio.h> //for delay

using namespace std;

int main()
{


   clock_t t1,t2;

   t1=clock(); // first time capture

   // Now your time spanning loop or code goes here
   // i am first trying to display time elapsed every time loop runs

   int ddays=0; // d prefix is just to say that this variable will be used for display
   int dhh=0;
   int dmm=0;
   int dss=0;

   int loopcount = 1000 ; // just for demo your loop will be different of course

   for(float count=1;count<loopcount;count++)
   {

     t2=clock(); // we get the time now

     float difference= (((float)t2)-((float)t1)); // gives the time elapsed since t1 in milliseconds

    // now get the time elapsed in seconds

    float seconds = difference/1000; // float value of seconds
    if (seconds<(60*60*24)) // a day is not over
    {
        dss = fmod(seconds,60); // the remainder is seconds to be displayed
        float minutes= seconds/60;  // the total minutes in float
        dmm= fmod(minutes,60);  // the remainder are minutes to be displayed
        float hours= minutes/60; // the total hours in float
        dhh= hours;  // the hours to be displayed
        ddays=0;
    }
    else // we have reached the counting of days
    {
        float days = seconds/(24*60*60);
        ddays = (int)(days);
        float minutes= seconds/60;  // the total minutes in float
        dmm= fmod(minutes,60);  // the rmainder are minutes to be displayed
        float hours= minutes/60; // the total hours in float
        dhh= fmod (hours,24);  // the hours to be displayed

    }

    cout<<"Count Is : "<<count<<"Time Elapsed : "<<ddays<<" Days "<<dhh<<" hrs "<<dmm<<" mins "<<dss<<" secs";


    // the actual working code here,I have just put a delay function
    delay(1000);
    system("cls");

 } // end for loop

}// end of main 
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2  
Whilst your answer is appreciated, we do prefer a pre-amble containing a brief description of the code. Thanks. –  Kev Sep 16 '12 at 22:51
    
This is not the elapsed time, but the processor time. –  JonnyJD Jul 29 at 16:54

the time(NULL) function will return the number of seconds elapsed since 01/01/1970 at 00:00. And because, that function is called at different time in your program, it will always be different Time in C++

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I don't know why someone downvoted, but your answer isn't entirely correct. For starters it doesn't return the date time, and it won't always be different. –  Matt Joiner Jun 2 '10 at 13:07
    
ah yes, that's what go wrong. thanks. –  vodkhang Jun 2 '10 at 14:42

time(NULL) returns the number of seconds elapsed since 01/01/1970 at 00:00 (the Epoch). So the difference between the two values is the number of seconds your processing took.

int t0 = time(NULL);
doSomthing();
doSomthingLong();
int t1 = time(NULL);

printf ("time = %d secs\n", t1 - t0);

You can get finer results with getttimeofday(), which return the current time in seconds, as time() does and also in microseconds.

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The values printed by your second program are seconds, and microseconds.

0 26339 = 0.026'339 s =   26339 µs
4 45025 = 4.045'025 s = 4045025 µs
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They are they same because your doSomething function happens faster than the granularity of the timer. Try:

printf ("**MyProgram::before time= %ld\n", time(NULL));

for(i = 0; i < 1000; ++i) {
    doSomthing();
    doSomthingLong();
}

printf ("**MyProgram::after time= %ld\n", time(NULL));
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Internally the function will access the system's clock, which is why it returns different values each time you call it. In general with non-functional languages there can be many side effects and hidden state in functions which you can't see just by looking at the function's name and arguments.

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The time(NULL) function call will return the number of seconds elapsed since epoc: January 1 1970. Perhaps what you mean to do is take the difference between two timestamps:

size_t start = time(NULL);
doSomthing();
doSomthingLong();

printf ("**MyProgram::time elapsed= %lds\n", time(NULL) - start);
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The reason both values are the same is because your long procedure doesn't take that long - less than one second. You can try just adding a long loop (for (int i = 0; i < 100000000; i++) ; ) at the end of the function to make sure this is the issue, then we can go from there...

In case the above turns out to be true, you will need to find a different system function (I understand you work on linux, so I can't help you with the function name) to measure time more accurately. I am sure there is a function simular to GetTickCount() in linux, you just need to find it.

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