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This wasn't the question I was going to ask but I have unexpectedly run aground with JavaScript arrays. I come from a PHP background and after looking at a few websites I am none the wiser.

I am trying to create a multi-dimensional array.

var photos = new Array;
var a = 0;
$("#photos img").each(function(i) {
    photos[a]["url"] = this.src;
    photos[a]["caption"] = this.alt;
    photos[a]["background"] = this.css('background-color');
    a++;
});

Error message: photos[a] is undefined. How do I do this? Thanks.

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marked as duplicate by Andreas Köberle, Mr. Alien, Dour High Arch, Sunil D., djf Jul 21 '13 at 17:46

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
this.css won't work, you have to wrap this inside a jQuery object: $(this).css. –  Ionuț G. Stan May 11 '10 at 9:04
    
While the title indicates a duplicate, what the asker really wanted was an array of objects, not an array of arrays. –  Ben Flynn Jul 21 '13 at 17:49

6 Answers 6

up vote 27 down vote accepted

JavaScript does not have multidimensional arrays, but arrays of arrays, which can be used in a similar way.

You may want to try the following:

var photos = [];
var a = 0;
$("#photos img").each(function(i) {
    photos[a] = [];
    photos[a]["url"] = this.src;
    photos[a]["caption"] = this.alt;
    photos[a]["background"] = this.css('background-color');
    a++;
});

Note that you could have used new Array() instead of [], but the latter is generally recommended. Also note that you were missing the parenthesis of new Array() in the first line.


UPDATE: Following from the comments below, in the above example there was no need to use arrays of arrays. An array of objects would have been more appropriate. The code is still valid because arrays are objects in this language, but the following would have been better:

photos[a] = {};
photos[a]["url"] = this.src;
photos[a]["caption"] = this.alt;
photos[a]["background"] = this.css('background-color');
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1  
An Array holds numeric keys, not strings. –  Alsciende May 11 '10 at 8:49
    
@Alsciende: That code is valid. An array is an object in JavaScript, and objects and hashtables are the same thing in this language. Therefore photos[0]["url"] is assigning a url property to photos[0]. –  Daniel Vassallo May 11 '10 at 8:55
5  
It's valid, but it's not proper. There's no point using an Array in that case, it's just confusing for novice people. –  Alsciende May 11 '10 at 8:57
2  
It's better to use photos[a] = {}; –  Ionuț G. Stan May 11 '10 at 8:59
3  
you're right the correct way is photos[a]={}; and not [], because var x=[]; x['foo']='bar'; alert(x.length) //0 you can see you're not populating the array, but acctually the object properties. –  Vitim.us Nov 10 '11 at 16:34

You're trying to assign something to photos[a]["url"], photos[a]["caption"], etc., but photos[a] doesn't exist yet. photos is an empty Array at first, so you have to set photos[a] to something first. Since you want to use string keys ("url", "caption", etc), this something should be a plain object (the javascript equivalent to php associave arrays) (or a Hash if your code base allows it). Then you can use a literal object construct to simplify your function, and Array#push to get rid of the unnecessary a:

var photos = [];
$("#photos img").each(function(img) {
    photos.push({
      url: img.src,
      caption: img.alt,
      background: img.style.backgroundColor
    });
});

Also, make sure that this is actually your img element. Some each implementations will set this to the global object in your case.

edit: ok, it looks like jQuery.each automatically sets this to the iterated element, but doesn't wrap it in jQuery-goodness, so you have to either wrap this in $() or use plain DOM (I used the latter in my example).

edit2: anyway, using this is kind of strange since the callback function passed to each receives an argument. Might as well use this argument (renamed).

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The only problem with this is that it doesn't have a css method. It must first be wrapped inside a jQuery object. –  Ionuț G. Stan May 11 '10 at 9:05
    
I don't much about jQuery. I'll use your advice. –  Alsciende May 11 '10 at 9:08
var photos = [];
var imgs = document.getElementById("photos").getElementsByTagName("img");
for(var i=0;i<imgs.length;i++){
    photos.push({
        src:imgs[i].src,
        alt:imgs[i].alt,
        background:imgs[i].style.backgroundColor
    });
}

That should give you something that is roughly equivalent to this in PHP (I made up pretend data):

Array(
    [0] => Array(
        "src" => "logo.png",
        "alt" => "My Logo!",
        "background" => "#ffffff"
    )
)

I hope this helps!

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1  
+1 for coding in plain js when possible –  Alsciende May 11 '10 at 9:14
    
thanks for making that more readable. –  tau May 12 '10 at 1:25

When I read this thread I was trying to get an understanding of multidimensional associative arrays. It wasn't clear so I kept researching, this is what I came up with:

var images = new Array;
images['logo'] = { 'src': 'http://example.com/image1.png', 'caption': 'this is the logo', 'background':  '#000'};
images['background'] = { 'src': 'http://example.com/image2.png', 'caption': 'this is the background', 'background':  '#FFF'};
alert(images['logo']['src']); /* output: http://example.com/image1.png */
alert(images['background']['caption']); /* output: this is the background */

Hope this helps!

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multi-dimensional arrays are in these structure:

var photos = new Array();
photos[0] = new Array();

use it as :

photos[0][0] = this.src;

more on JS array here.

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Douglas Crockford, of JSLint, would have you create it this way ("Use the array literal notation []"):

var photos = [];

Now remember that you want to create multi-dimensional arrays, which means an array inside an array. This means you need to create the inner-arrays:

$("#photos img").each(function(i) {
  photos[a] = []
  //continue
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