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i have a guid value that i store in my hidden variable. say for eg (303427ca-2a5c-df11-a391-005056b73dd7)

now how do i convert the value from this hidden field back to GUID value (because the method i would be calling expects a GUID value).

thank you.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Just use the overloaded constructor:

try
{
  Guid guid = new Guid("{D843D80B-F77D-4655-8A3E-684CC35B26CB}");
}
catch (Exception ex) // There might be a more appropriate exception to catch
{
  // Do something here in case the parsing fails.
}
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this definitely would be the simplest method –  espais May 11 '10 at 12:25
    
@espais: Yes, I am sometimes scared when I see how easy thoses things have become. –  ereOn May 11 '10 at 12:27
1  
Worth noting that there is no TryParse available for GUID so you may want to wrap this in a try/catch block. –  Peter Kelly May 11 '10 at 15:39
    
Thanks @Peter Kelly for pointing that out. I updated my answer to add this advice. –  ereOn May 11 '10 at 16:21
    
catch FormatException –  Ronnie Overby Nov 6 '11 at 20:14

You are making it pretty easy on an attacker by storing the Guid in a string. Trivial to find back in, say, the paging file. Store it in a Guid and kill two birds with one stone.

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+1 for a very good point –  espais May 11 '10 at 12:25
    string strGuid;
    strGuid = (your guid here);
    Guid guid = new Guid(strGuid);

For more info, MSDN

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Guid has a constructor for string Guids.

Guid guid = new Guid(myStringGuid);
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new Guid(myHiddenFieldString)

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I think it can be done simply as following:

Guid MyGuid = new Guid(stringValue);
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In .NET4 onwards you can also use:

Guid myGuid = Guid.Parse(myGuidString); 

Just a matter of coding preference, but some people find this more intuitive.

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