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I wanted to generate the following using XmlSerializer :

<atom:link href="http://dallas.example.com/rss.xml" rel="self" type="application/rss+xml" />

So I tried to add a Namespace to my element :

[...]

    [XmlElement("link", Namespace="atom")]
    public AtomLink AtomLink { get; set; }

[...]

But the output is :

<link xmlns="atom" href="http://dallas.example.com/rss.xml" rel="self" type="application/rss+xml" />

So what is the correct way to generate prefixed tags ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

First off, the atom namespace is normally this:

xmlns:atom="http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom"

In order to get your tags to use the atom namespace prefix, you need to mark your properties with it:

[XmlElement("link", Namespace="http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom")]
public AtomLink AtomLink { get; set; }

You also need tell the XmlSerializer to use it (thanks to @Marc Gravell):

XmlSerializerNamespaces ns = new XmlSerializerNamespaces();
ns.Add("atom", "http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom");
XmlSerializer xser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(MyType));
xser.Serialize(Console.Out, new MyType(), ns);
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Thank you ! I understand my error :) –  hoang May 11 '10 at 12:34

Take a look at Xml Serialization and namespace prefixes

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In fact I am already using this : XmlSerializerNamespaces ns = new XmlSerializerNamespaces(); ns.Add("atom", "w3.org/2005/Atom"); serializer.Serialize(xmlWriter, _rss, ns); And it just adds xmlns:atom="w3.org/2005/Atom"; as an attribute to my root element ... but no prefix to my <link> tag –  hoang May 11 '10 at 12:28

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