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i have opened a mainform and call a child form like

     Form4 f = new Form4();
     f.Owner = this;
     f.Show(this);

in form4, user selects a text file, the contents of which are to be displayed in a textBox1 of mainform

i was trying something like

Owner.textBox1.Text = "file contents";

but it does'nt work

share|improve this question
6  
Pro tip: whenever you find yourself writing "it doesn't work", don't. Instead, explain what happened and how that's different from what you wanted. Error messages, for example, exist for a reason. – Thomas May 11 '10 at 13:12
    
Its better use an event in form4, it shouldn't be form4 responsibility to change the mainform. its up to the mainform to react to whats happening in form4. – Hath May 11 '10 at 13:19
    
You might want to give your elements a more descriptive name that "Form4" and "textBox1". Else in a month you yourself won't know what purpose they serve. – Hans Kesting May 11 '10 at 13:35

The best way to link different forms together is via events. Create an event in Form4 like FileSelected and then do something like this:

Form4 f = new Form4();
f.FileSelected += (owner, args) => {
    textBox1.Text = args.FileName;
};
f.Show(this);
share|improve this answer
    
yes, now there is some processing of the text required so i have to call a method like parse_names(string filename) this method is located in parent form, although i copied and pasted it again in child form, still is there a shorter way. plus the contents of the parsed_text is sent to textBox1 of mainform thanx in advance – arvind May 11 '10 at 13:24
    
@arvind: If you have method that you want to use in multiple forms, then create a (helper) class and move that method over there. – Hans Kesting May 11 '10 at 13:33
    
@arvind: if you have another problem you should edit your existing question and add the new status of your problem or you ask a complete new question, if you run into a new problem. Otherwise less people will see the current status thous less people can help you. – Oliver May 11 '10 at 13:34
    
the above solution helps , but there is a method parse_text to be called – arvind May 11 '10 at 13:35
    
i m sorry i did not mention it above, because at that time that was the BIG problem – arvind May 11 '10 at 13:36

Besides this is really bad design, you need to make textBox1 a public member of your main form and cast f.Owner to the main form type.

Like:

 Form4 f = new Form4();
 f.Owner = this;
 f.Show(this);

 // Inside Form4
 MainForm main = this.Owner as MainForm;
 if (main != null) main.textBox1.Text...
share|improve this answer
    
yes, this is really bad design and i have to deter myself not to downvote your answer, cause it is soooo wrrooooonnngg. ;) – Oliver May 11 '10 at 13:25
    
thank you, but i have really found a very good way to do it. it seems flawless, i just wrote the following Form z = Application.OpenForms["mainform"]; ((mainform)(z)). parse_names(filename); it not only reduces the number of copies of parse_name method, but i dont have to declare textbox1 as global. i hope it will help others too. – arvind May 11 '10 at 13:30
    
@Oliver: Yeah, it really hurt to write this. Done my ten punishment push-ups ;-) – Johannes Rudolph May 11 '10 at 13:32
    
What is best practice for doing this? Why is this way bad? – NickG Jul 23 '15 at 14:45

A best practice would be to define yourself a property that would itself set the Text property of your private control. Here's an instance:

public partial class MainForm : Form {
    public string ContentDescription {
        set {
            textBox1.Text = value.trim();
        }
    }
}

Then after, you'll be able to access this property through type-casting to your particular type:

public partial class SecondaryForm : Form {
    public MainForm OwnerForm {
        get {
            return (MainForm)this.Owner;
        }
    }

    public void someMethod() {
        OwnerForm.ContentDescription = "file contents";
    }
}

Remember that in C#, every Control is declared private. So, to access it, the best practice is to define a property that will grant you the required access to it. Making a member public is generally not a good idea, depending on what you're trying to achieve.

EDIT For the parse method, perhaps should you consider making it public or internal so that you may access it through the correctly type-casted Owner property of your child form.

Making a hlper class might be the right solution though, so it is not GUI dependent.

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In Form4 you can cast Owner to the correct type:

var o = (Form1) this.Owner;
o.textBox1.Text = "file contents";

For this to work, the owner must be of type Form1 and textBox1 on that type must be a public member or property.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you, but i have really found a very good way to do it. it seems flawless, i just wrote the following Form z = Application.OpenForms["mainform"]; ((mainform)(z)). parse_names(filename); it not only reduces the number of copies of parse_name method, but i dont have to declare textbox1 as global. i hope it will help others too. – arvind May 11 '10 at 13:31
    
Haha ok, good for you @arvind, but how was I supposed to know that there was a method called parse_names when you did not mention it in your question. – Klaus Byskov Pedersen May 11 '10 at 13:58

As Andrew already gave the correct solution for event driven, there is also a sync (or blocking) method available:

Form4 f = new Form4;
if(f.ShowDialog() == DialogResult.OK)
{
    textBox1.Text = f.FileName;
}
share|improve this answer

You will need to set the "modifiers" to at least public for the properties of the control to be able to have access to it.

alt text

share|improve this answer
    
Or write a property that will grant restricted access to the targeted control's property. That is the prefered practice, though yours will work as well. – Will Marcouiller May 11 '10 at 13:29

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