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I have a large table with 1 million+ records. Unfortunately, the person who created the table decided to put dates in a varchar(50) field.

I need to do a simple date comparison -

datediff(dd, convert(datetime, lastUpdate, 100), getDate()) < 31

But it fails on the convert():

Conversion failed when converting datetime from character string.

Apparently there is something in that field it doesn't like, and since there are so many records, I can't tell just by looking at it. How can I properly sanitize the entire date field so it does not fail on the convert()? Here is what I have now:

select count(*)
from MyTable
where
    isdate(lastUpdate) > 0
    and datediff(dd, convert(datetime, lastUpdate, 100), getDate()) < 31

@SQLMenace

I'm not concerned about performance in this case. This is going to be a one time query. Changing the table to a datetime field is not an option.

@Jon Limjap

I've tried adding the third argument, and it makes no difference.


@SQLMenace

The problem is most likely how the data is stored, there are only two safe formats; ISO YYYYMMDD; ISO 8601 yyyy-mm-dd Thh:mm:ss:mmm (no spaces)

Wouldn't the isdate() check take care of this?

I don't have a need for 100% accuracy. I just want to get most of the records that are from the last 30 days.


@SQLMenace

select isdate('20080131') -- returns 1
select isdate('01312008') -- returns 0

@Brian Schkerke

Place the CASE and ISDATE inside the CONVERT() function.

Thanks! That did it.

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You haven't mentioned what formats the dates are in for the varchar field. Are they consistently formatted? Knowing the format would help out quite a bit with solving the problem. –  Kibbee Aug 26 '08 at 14:33

10 Answers 10

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Place the CASE and ISDATE inside the CONVERT() function.

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM MyTable WHERE DATEDIFF(dd, CONVERT(DATETIME, CASE IsDate(lastUpdate) when 1 then lastUpdate ELSE '12-30-1899' end), getDate()) < 31

Replace '12-30-1899' with the default date of your choice.

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I would suggest cleaning up the mess and changing the column to a datetime because doing stuff like this

WHERE datediff(dd, convert(datetime, lastUpdate), getDate()) < 31

cannot use an index and it will be many times slower than if you had a datetime colum,n and did

where lastUpdate > getDate() -31

You also need to take into account hours and seconds of course

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I am sure that changing the table/column might not be an option due to any legacy system requirements, but have you thought about creating a view which has the date conversion logic built in, if you are using a more recent version of sql, then you can possibly even use an indexed view?

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How about writing a cursor to loop through the contents, attempting the cast for each entry?

When an error occurs, output the primary key or other identifying details for the problem record.

I can't think of a set-based way to do this.

Edit - ah yes, I forgot about ISDATE(). Definitely a better approach than using a cursor. +1 to SQLMenace.

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The ISDATE() would take care of the rows which were not formatted properly if it were indeed being executed first. However, if you look at the execution plan you'll probably find that the DATEDIFF predicate is being applied first - thus the cause of your pain.

If you're using SQL Server Management Studio hit CTRL-L to view the estimated execution plan for a particular query.

Remember, SQL isn't a procedural language and short circuiting logic may work, but only if you're careful in how you apply it.

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How about writing a cursor to loop through the contents, attempting the cast for each entry?When an error occurs, output the primary key or other identifying details for the problem record. I can't think of a set-based way to do this.

Not totally setbased but if only 3 rows out of 1 million are bad it will save you a lot of time

select * into BadDates
from Yourtable
where isdate(lastUpdate) = 0

select * into GoodDates
from Yourtable
where isdate(lastUpdate) = 1

then just look at the BadDates table and fix that

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Wouldn't the isdate() check take care of this?

Run this to see what happens

select isdate('20080131')
select isdate('01312008')
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The problem is most likely how the data is stored, there are only two safe formats

ISO YYYYMMDD

ISO 8601 yyyy-mm-dd Thh:mm:ss:mmm(no spaces)

these will work no matter what your language is.

You might need to do a SET DATEFORMAT YMD (or whatever the data is stored as) to make it work

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Print out the records. Give the hardcopy to the idiot who decided to use a varchar(50) and ask them to find the problem record.

Next time they might just see the point of choosing an appropriate data type.

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In your convert call, you need to specify a third style parameter, e.g., the format of the datetimes that are stored as varchar, as specified in this document: CAST and CONVERT (T-SQL)

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