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I'm wondering what options one has in xhtml 1.0 strict to create a line on both sides of text like-so:

Section one
----------------------- Next section -----------------------
Section two

I've thought of doing some fancy things like this:

<div style="float:left; width: 44%;"><hr/></div>
<div style="float:right; width: 44%;"><hr/></div>
Next section

Or alternatively, because the above has problems with alignment (both vertical and horizontal):

<table><tr>
<td style="width:47%"><hr/></td>
<td style="vertical-align:middle; text-align: center">Next section</td>
<td style="width:47%"><hr/></td>
</tr></table>

This also has alignment problems, which I solve with this mess:

<table><tr>
<td style="border-bottom: 1px solid gray; width: 47%">&nbsp;</td>
<td style="vertical-align:middle;text-align:center" rowspan="2">Next section</td>
<td style="border-bottom: 1px solid gray; width: 47%">&nbsp;</td>
</tr><tr>
<td>&nbsp;</td>
<td>&nbsp;</td>
</tr></table>

In addition to the alignment problems, both options feel 'fudgy', and I'd be much obliged if you happened to have seen this before and know of an elegant solution.

Thank you for reading.

Brian

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1  
Here's another thread with a no-extra-tags challenge - and a solution! stackoverflow.com/questions/12648513/… –  willoller Sep 29 '12 at 0:06
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18 Answers 18

up vote 63 down vote accepted

How about:

<div style="height: 2px; background-color: black; text-align: center">
  <span style="background-color: white; position: relative; top: -0.5em;">
    Section Title
  </span>
</div>

position: relative; top: -0.5em; is the key to this method. It lets you vertically center the text. Unfortunately this method requires you to know the background color of your site so that the text doesn't end up looking like it has a line through it.

As an alternative to using a background color to create the line, you could use border-top. With that you could bring in border effects like dotted lines.

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@Brian fixed the width problem. –  Fletcher Moore May 11 '10 at 17:29
2  
Getting exact top value is a bit hard. It is not exactly -0.5em; –  Mitar Dec 4 '11 at 19:47
7  
Not good, it has forced white background. –  Pointer Null Nov 2 '12 at 1:08
    
perfect. "Responsive" too –  JimXC Nov 24 '13 at 23:33
    
See my answer for a solution that doesn't require you to specify the background color or the width. –  MartinF Apr 28 at 7:35
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Try this:

CSS:

.divider {
    width:500px;
    text-align:center;
}

.divider hr {
    margin-left:auto;
    margin-right:auto;
    width:40%;

}

.left {
    float:left;
}

.right {
    float:right;
}

HTML:

<div class="divider">
<hr class="left"/>TEXT<hr class="right" />
</div>
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It works perfectly and uses <hr /> so what possibly could be wrong with this answer? I say nothing. –  Kirby Nov 6 '11 at 2:34
2  
+1 No need to mess with background color or use tags in unintended ways. One downside is that .divider hr width depends on how long the text is. Suggestion: .divider and .divider hr widths should be specified in em units. To get hr width, use (.divider width minus # of chars) / 2 . –  Kelvin Jan 31 '13 at 22:38
1  
It is not the best solution. What if you have no certainty about the width of the text. All will be ruined when text will be longer. –  Iwona Trąbka Mar 28 at 8:31
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UPDATE: This will not work using HTML5

Instead, check out this question for more techniques: CSS challenge, can I do this without introducing more HTML?


I used line-height:0 to create the effect in the header of my site guerilla-alumnus.com

<div class="description">
   <span>Text</span>
</div>

.description {
   border-top:1px dotted #AAAAAA;
}

.description span {
   background:white none repeat scroll 0 0;
   line-height:0;
   padding:0.1em 1.5em;
   position:relative;
}

Another good method is on http://robots.thoughtbot.com/

He uses a background image and floats to achieve a cool effect

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1  
I like this, it looks great on your site, but I couldn't get it to work (I suspect interference from jQuery css). :( But it is really cool. –  Brian M. Hunt May 11 '10 at 17:42
    
I think your h1 is pushing the span down. –  bababa May 17 '12 at 20:56
1  
This is a "hack" that employs the different rendering behaviour for DOCTYPE XTHML 1.0 Transitional. If you use DOCTYPE html (for HTML5), it will NOT work. –  TahitiPetey Jan 5 '13 at 0:09
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I just came across the same problem, here is one way to solve it:

<table width="100%">
  <tr>
    <td><hr /></td>
    <td style="width:1px; padding: 0 10px; white-space: nowrap;">Some text</td>
    <td><hr /></td>
  </tr>
</table>​

It works without setting a background on the text element, i.e. it will look good regardless what background is behind it.

You can try it out here: http://jsfiddle.net/88vgS/

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Doesn't solve the OP's problem. That creates two lines with text between them. He wants a line that's broken part way through and has text at the broken section, then the line continues. –  Dracorat Jun 21 '13 at 21:11
    
It actually does what the OP is asking for. You can see it at jsfiddle.net/88vgS –  Robert Kajic Jun 23 '13 at 17:08
    
Also, what is a line broken part way through, with text at the broken section, if not two lines with text in between them? –  Robert Kajic Jun 23 '13 at 17:17
    
I misread the solution - so I reversed my td. Sorry. –  Dracorat Jun 24 '13 at 2:56
    
You should throw appropriate TR tags in there. I think that's what got me confused for a moment. I originally thought for some reason it was on three lines, not three columns. Correct markup probably wouldn't have caused me to see it that way. Regardless, it's definitely a workable solution. –  Dracorat Jun 24 '13 at 15:09
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If you can use CSS and are willing to use the deprecated align attribute, a styled fieldset/legend will work:

<style type="text/css">
fieldset { 
    border-width: 1px 0 0 0;
}
</style>

<fieldset>
<legend align="center">First Section</legend>
Section 1 Stuff
</fieldset>

<fieldset>
<legend align="center">Second Section</legend>
Section 2 Stuff
</fieldset>

The intended purpose of a fieldset is to logically group form fields. As willoler pointed out, a text-align: center style for will not work for legend elements. align="center" is deprecated HTML but it should center the text properly in all browsers.

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A more detailed explanation of what I was going for. –  dclowd9901 May 11 '10 at 17:10
1  
+1 semantic -1 doesn't actually center legend –  willoller May 11 '10 at 17:17
    
I'm pretty sure <legend> takes on the display traits of a block or inline-block element, as it can be padded and margined, which means text-align:center shouldn't work... –  dclowd9901 May 11 '10 at 17:24
    
yeah legends are great for semantics - i use them for wrapping radio groups but they are notoriously stubborn –  willoller May 11 '10 at 17:27
    
I corrected my answer. Unfortunately due to the stubbornness of certain browsers in styling the legend element, align="center" is the only solution I could find that reliably centers a legend. –  Trey Hunner May 11 '10 at 17:54
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The way to solve this without knowing the width and the background color is the following:

Structure

<div class="strike">
   <span>Kringle</span>
</div>

CSS

.strike {
    display: block;
    text-align: center;
    overflow: hidden;
    white-space: nowrap; 
}

.strike > span {
    position: relative;
    display: inline-block;
}

.strike > span:before,
.strike > span:after {
    content: "";
    position: absolute;
    top: 50%;
    width: 9999px;
    height: 1px;
    background: red;
}

.strike > span:before {
    right: 100%;
    margin-right: 15px;
}

.strike > span:after {
    left: 100%;
    margin-left: 15px;
}

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/z8Hnz/

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This version works better if you are using an image for the line -- or at least it is easier to edit and remain responsive –  tehlivi Jun 17 at 15:53
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<fieldset style="border:0px; border-top:1px solid black">
    <legend>Test</legend>
</fieldset>

Evil hack ...

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1  
I wouldn't call it a hack, but I would test that it works in all browsers you intend to support. –  NickLarsen May 11 '10 at 17:27
    
fieldset doesn't want to be used like that, it's been hacked into place ;-) –  Dänu May 30 '10 at 16:24
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<div style="text-align: center; border-top: 1px solid black">
  <div style="display: inline-block; position: relative; top: -10px; background-color: white; padding: 0px 10px">text</div>
</div>
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You can accomplish this without <hr />. Semantically, design should be done with the means of CSS, in this case it is quite possible.

div.header
{
  position: relative;
  text-align: center;
  padding: 0 10px;
  background: #ffffff;
}

div.line
{
  position: absolute;
  top: 50%;
  border-top: 1px dashed;
  z-index: -1;
}

<div class="header">
  Next section
  <div class="line">&nbsp;</div>
</div>
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Woohoo my first post even though this is a year old. To avoid the background-coloring issues with wrappers, you could use inline-block with hr (nobody said that explicitly). Text-align should center correctly since they are inline elements.

<div style="text-align:center">
    <hr style="display:inline-block; position:relative; top:4px; width:45%" />
       &nbsp;New Section&nbsp;
    <hr style="display:inline-block; position:relative; top:4px; width:45%" />
</div>
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Bumping up a 2 year old post, but here is how I approach these situations using only one element and CSS.

​h1 {
    text-align: center;
}

h1:before,
h1:after {
    content: "";
    background: url('http://heritageonfifth.com/images/seperator.png') left center repeat-x;
    width: 15%;
    height: 30px;
    display: inline-block;
    margin: 0 15px 0 0;
}

h1:after{
    background-position: right center;
    margin: 0 0 0 15px;
}

​And here is a fiddle to check it out: http://jsfiddle.net/sRhBc/ (random image from Google taken for the border).

The only drawback of this approach is that it doesn't support IE7.

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+1 IMHO this is the best answer –  Danield Jan 2 '13 at 9:34
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Taking @kajic's solution and putting the styling in CSS:

<table class="tablehr">
  <td><hr /></td>
  <td>Text!</td>
  <td><hr /></td>
</table>

Then CSS (but it depends on CSS3 in using nth selector):

.tablehr { width:100%; }
.tablehr > tbody > tr > td:nth-child(2) { width:1px; padding: 0 10px; white-space: nowrap; }

Cheers.

(P.S. On tbody and tr, Chrome, IE and Firefox at least automatically inserts a tbody and tr, which is why my sample, like @kajic's, didn't include these so as to keep things shorter in the needed html markup. This solution was tested with newest versions of IE, Chrome, and Firefox, as of 2013).

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You could try doing a fieldset, and aligning the "legend" element (your "next section" text) to the middle of the field with only border-top set. I'm not sure about how a legend is positioned in accordance with the fieldset element. I imagine it might just be a simple margin: 0px auto to do the trick, though.

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I use a h1 with a span in the middle.

HTML Example:

<h1><span>Test archief</span></h1>

CSS Example:

.archive h1 {border-top:3px dotted #AAAAAA;}
.archive h1 span { display:block; background:#fff; width:200px; margin:-23px auto; text-align:center }

Simple as that.

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Welcome to StackOverflow, Youri. Instead of a span, you could consider using a div. It serves the same purpose, except it is naturally a block element. :) –  Nix Sep 18 '12 at 13:29
    
@Nix Block element inside inline element? No thanks, span is a good choice –  Jonathan Azulay Jan 17 '13 at 21:50
    
@MrAzulay h1 is an inline element. span is nice for wrapping stuff, but the reason I prefer a div in this case, is because Youri use CSS to set the span to display:block;. I don't see the point of making an inline element into a block element, when there are suitable block elements (div) readily available. –  Nix Jan 17 '13 at 23:18
    
@Nix Isn't that a pretty common thing to do? While putting blocks inside inline is bad practice imo. This is a good post about it skypoetsworld.blogspot.se/2008/10/… –  Jonathan Azulay Jan 17 '13 at 23:31
    
Ooops, I mistyped in my latest comment. I agree that you shouldn't place a block inside an inline element, but h1 is actually a BLOCK element. Sorry for the confusion. Still, I don't see the point of making a span into a block element, but fair enough. –  Nix Jan 18 '13 at 0:06
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There's always the good old FIELDSET

 fieldset
 {
border-left: none;
border-right: none;
border-bottom: none;
 }
 fieldset legend
 {
text-align: center;
padding-left: 10px;
padding-right: 10px;
 }
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Fieldsets should only be used with forms. –  tehlivi Jun 17 at 15:53
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Looking at above, I modified to:

CSS

.divider {
    font: 33px sans-serif;
    margin-top: 30px;
    text-align:center;
    text-transform: uppercase;
}
.divider span {
    position:relative;
}
.divider span:before, .divider span:after {
    border-top: 2px solid #000;
    content:"";
    position: absolute;
    top: 15px;
    right: 10em;
    bottom: 0;
    width: 80%;
}
.divider span:after {
    position: absolute;
    top: 15px;
    left:10em;
    right:0;
    bottom: 0;
}

HTML

<div class="divider">
    <span>This is your title</span></div>

Seems to work fine.

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DEMO PAGE

HTML

<header>
  <h1 contenteditable>Write something</h1>
</header>

CSS

header{ 
  display:table;
  text-align:center; 
}
header:before, header:after{ 
  content:'';
  display:table-cell; 
  background:#000; 
  width:50%;
  -webkit-transform:scaleY(0.3);
  transform:scaleY(0.3);
}
header > h1{ white-space:pre; padding:0 15px; }
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You can create a wrapper block with some appropriate background image (and also set some background color for your centered text block).

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