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I have code that looks like this:

public class A
{
    public void doStuff()
    {
        System.out.print("Stuff successfully done");
    }
}

public class B extends A
{
    public void doStuff()
    {
        System.out.print("Stuff successfully done, but in a different way");
    }

    public void doMoreStuff()
    {

        System.out.print("More advanced stuff successully done");
    }
}

public class AWrapper
{
    public A member;

    public AWrapper(A member)
    {
        this.member = member;
    }

    public void doStuffWithMember()
    {
        a.doStuff();
    }
}

public class BWrapper extends AWrapper
{
    public B member;

    public BWrapper(B member)
    {
        super(member);         //Pointer to member stored in two places:
        this.member = member;  //Not great if one changes, but the other does not

    }

    public void doStuffWithMember()
    {
        member.doMoreStuff();
    }
}

However, there is a problem with this code. I'm storing a reference to the member in two places, but if one changes and the other does not, there could be trouble. I know that in Java, an inherited method can narrow down its return type (and perhaps arguments, but I'm not certain) to a derived class. Is the same true of fields?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can accomplish this better with generics.

public class AWrapper<T extends A>
{
    public T member;
    public AWrapper(T member)
    {
        this.member = member;
    }

    public void doStuffWithMember()
    {
        a.doStuff();
    }
}    

public class BWrapper extends Wrapper<B>
{
    public BWrapper(B member)
    {
        super(member);
    }

    public void doStuffWithMember()
    {
        member.doMoreStuff();
    }
}

The fact that the subclass wrapper specifies the type of B allows you to access B's functions in the BWrapper, without storing an additional reference.

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1  
Not necessarily. You can genericize the wrapper as many layers deep as you want, but if you're doing this kind of coding you're probably modeling the domain wrong. –  Jherico May 11 '10 at 19:16
    
Ah sorry, I confused with my past expereince where I didn't want to genericize second level class for readability issues. Yes, one is willing to make BWrapper generic it will work fine. –  doublep May 11 '10 at 19:44
    
What does this syntax mean? public <T> class? I've only ever seem type parameters after identifiers –  Eric May 14 '10 at 6:24
    
@Eric I was confusing the syntax for static method declarations of generic types with the class declaration format. Edited to fix. –  Jherico May 14 '10 at 16:49
    
Yeah, but I've still seen that syntax elsewhere on SO. Is it ever appropriate, or is it just a common mistake? –  Eric May 14 '10 at 20:27
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In your class BWrapper you have to remove the line public B member;. And in the method doMoreStuffWithMember() replace the line with:

((B) member).doMoreStuff();
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1  
If you have to cast, you're doing it wrong. –  Jherico May 11 '10 at 18:59
    
@Jherico: But in this case you are sure it is an instance of B. –  Martijn Courteaux May 11 '10 at 19:37
    
You cannot be sure as written here, because AWrapper.member is public and could be set to a non-B instance. You would not even be safe if the attribute was protected, because some subclass of BWrapper could set the attribute. –  Christian Semrau May 11 '10 at 20:34
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