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I'm sure the answer is ridiculously obvious, but so far Google hasn't been very helpful. How do I set up a shell script to execute from the dock? It seems that simply creating a shortcut will open the file in my editor. Is there a flag I need to set somewhere to tell it to run instead of opening it for editing?

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should +1 solely for the avatar, though i like the topic too. –  Matt Bannert Aug 17 '10 at 8:37
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9 Answers

up vote 89 down vote accepted

You could create a Automator workflow with a single step - "Run Shell Script"

Then File > Save As, and change the File Format to "Application". When you open the application, it will run the Shell Script step, executing the command, exiting after it completes.

The benefit to this is it's really simple to do, and you can very easily get user input (say, selecting a bunch of files), then pass it to the input of the shell script (either to stdin, or as arguments).

(Automator is in your /Applications folder!)

Example workflow

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@dbr, GUI button pusher! :) Just kidding, that is a good suggestion! –  Abyss Knight Nov 11 '08 at 18:20
    
Yeah, it was an excellent suggestion :) I've even written Automator actions for some of my apps and I still forget about it in times like this :) –  Jason Coco Nov 11 '08 at 23:42
    
Perfect. Thanks! –  Jeremy Ricketts Apr 30 '09 at 18:09
    
I can't get this to work with nohup, a la "nohup /usr/bin/myscript & ; disown -a && exit 0". I need the app/workflow to run a script and exit immediately. Any ideas? :-) –  Ali Nabavi Jan 23 '10 at 3:02
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@martineau If you open the application by doing open -a SomeAppThing.app --args --etc=2 it should focus. Alternatively you can focus it using Applescript (e.g osascript -e 'tell application "Google Chrome" to activate') –  dbr Feb 8 at 2:20
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If you don't need a Terminal window, you can make any executable file an Application just by moving example.sh to example.sh.app/Contents/MacOS/example.sh. You can place the Application in your dock like any other, and execute it with a click.

If you do need to have the terminal window displayed, I don't have a simple solution. You could probably do something with Applescript, but that's not very clean.

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You don't happen to know if there is an easy way to have files passed as arguments to the shell script? For files opened using "open with...". –  Fuzzy76 Jun 14 '11 at 12:05
    
@Fuzzy Sorry, no, I never figured that out. –  Jeremy Banks Jun 15 '11 at 2:33
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For anyone trying to do this--the name of the app must exactly match the script name. So it really has to be example.sh.app, not just example.app. You will get a warning about damaged app if these do not match –  Kip Aug 15 '13 at 2:35
    
To clarify -- I'm an OSX noob -- you mean just create a folder structure like the one shown in your example with the script file placed in it as shown? –  martineau Jan 27 at 21:37
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@martineau Yes, that's correct. If you create a folder whose name ends in .app and with that structure, it will be treated as an executable Application. If you want to look at the contents of that folder in the Finder, you'll need to right click on it and select "view package contents" (because double-clicking on it would run the application). In the Terminal, it will just appear to be a folder. (I'm not sure if Finder will let you rename the folder to .app by itself; you may need to do the rename in the Terminal.) –  Jeremy Banks Jan 27 at 21:48
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I know this is old but in case it is helpful to others:

If you need to run a script and want the terminal to pop up so you can see the results you can do like Abyss Knight said and change the extension to .command. If you double click on it it will open a terminal window and run.

I however needed this to run from automator or appleScript. So to get this to open a new terminal the command I ran from "run shell script" was "open myShellScript.command" and it opened in a new terminal.

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wonderful, thanks! Now all need want to make it a perfect solution would be a way to close the terminal window when the script completes. –  Peter McMahan Sep 1 '11 at 16:50
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well if you have close window on exit selected in the terminal preferences you can add the exit command to your script and you'll have what you want. –  Jason Tholstrup Sep 6 '11 at 15:40
    
This doesn't work on OSX 10.9 Mavericks. –  stiemannkj1 Jun 13 at 2:26
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I think this thread may be helpful: http://forums.macosxhints.com/archive/index.php/t-70973.html

To paraphrase, you can rename it with the .command extension or create an AppleScript to run the shell.

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On Snow Leopard at least, adding a .command extension to a script makes it run in the terminal if you double-click it, but for some reason you still can't drag it into the dock. dbr's and Jeremy's suggestions both worked for me, though. –  Jo Liss Dec 3 '10 at 13:25
    
This doesn't work on OSX 10.9 Mavericks. –  stiemannkj1 Jun 13 at 2:24
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As joe mentioned, creating the shell script and then creating an applescript script to call the shell script, will accomplish this, and is quite handy.

Shell Script

  1. Create your shell script in your favorite text editor, for example:

    mono "/Volumes/Media/~Users/me/Software/keepass/keepass.exe"

    (this runs the w32 executable, using the mono framework)

  2. Save shell script, for my example "StartKeepass.sh"

Apple Script

  1. Open AppleScript Editor, and call the shell script

    do shell script "sh /Volumes/Media/~Users/me/Software/StartKeepass.sh" user name "<enter username here>" password "<Enter password here>" with administrator privileges

    • do shell script - applescript command to call external shell commands
    • "sh ...." - this is your shell script (full path) created in step one (you can also run direct commands, I could omit the shell script and just run my mono command here)
    • user name - declares to applescript you want to run the command as a specific user
    • "<enter username here> - replace with your username (keeping quotes) ex "josh"
    • password - declares to applescript your password
    • "<enter password here>" - replace with your password (keeping quotes) ex "mypass"
    • with administrative privileges - declares you want to run as an admin

Create Your .APP

  1. save your applescript as filename.scpt, in my case RunKeepass.scpt

  2. save as... your applescript and change the file format to application, resulting in RunKeepass.app in my case

  3. Copy your app file to your apps folder

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As long as your script is executable and doesn't have any extension you can drag it as-is to the right side (Document side) of the Dock and it will run in a terminal window when clicked instead of opening an editor.

If you want to have an extension (like foo.sh), you can go to the file info window in Finder and change the default application for that particular script from whatever it is (TextEdit, TextMate, whatever default is set on your computer for .sh files) to Terminal. It will then just execute instead of opening in a text editor. Again, you will have to drag it to the right side of the Dock.

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Note: This does not work in OSX 10.9 Mavericks. –  stiemannkj1 Jun 13 at 2:14
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In the Script Editor:

do shell script "/full/path/to/your/script -with 'all desired args'"

Save as an application.

As long as all you want to do is get the effect of the script, this will work fine. You won't see STDOUT or STDERR.

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I would suggest: "Save as an application BUNDLE". The bundles launch much faster than applications. –  e.James Nov 21 '08 at 21:06
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Someone wrote...

I just set all files that end in ".sh" to open with Terminal. It works fine and you don't have to change the name of each shell script you want to run.

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On OSX Mavericks:

  1. Create your shell script.
  2. Make your shell script executable:

    chmod +x your-shell-script.sh
    
  3. Rename your script to have a .app suffix:

    mv your-shell-script.sh your-shell-script.app
    
  4. Drag the script to the OSX dock.
  5. Rename your script back to a .sh suffix:

    mv your-shell-script.app your-shell-script.sh
    
  6. Right-click the file in Finder, and click the "Get Info" option.
  7. At the bottom of the window, set the shell script to open with the terminal.

Now when you click on the script in the dock, A terminal window will pop up and execute your script.

Bonus: To get the terminal to close when your script has completed, add exit 0 to the end and change the terminal settings to "close the shell if exited cleanly" like it says to do in this SO answer.

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