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So if you look at my other posts, it's no surprise I'm building a robot that can collect data in a forest, and stick it on a map. We have algorithms that can detect tree centers and trunk diameters and can stick them on a cartesian XY plane.

We're planning to use certain 'key' trees as natural landmarks for localizing the robot, using triangulation and trilateration among other methods, but programming this and keeping data straight and efficient is getting difficult using just Matlab.

Is there a technique for sub-setting an array or matrix of points? Say I have 1000 trees stored over 1km (1000m), is there a way to say, select only points within 30m radius of my current location and work only with those?

I would just use a GIS, but I'm doing this in Matlab and I'm unaware of any GIS plugins for Matlab.

I forgot to mention, this code is going online, meaning it's going on a robot for real-time execution. I don't know if, as the map grows to several miles, using a different data structure will help or if calculating every distance to a random point is what a spatial database is going to do anyway.

I'm thinking of mirroring the array of trees, into two arrays, one sorted by X and the other by Y. Then bubble sorting to determine the 30m range in that. I do the same for both arrays, X and Y, and then have a third cross link table that will select the individual values. But I don't know, what that's called, how to program that and I'm sure someone already has so I don't want to reinvent the wheel.

Cartesian Plane
GIS

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GIS? Cartesian plane? –  Potatoswatter May 11 '10 at 23:25
    
What does that mean? You don't know what either mean or are you asking something else? I added links at the bottom of the question for you. –  Phil Salesses May 11 '10 at 23:36
    
Sorry, I'm not too familiar with geography, but it strikes me that latitude+longitude aren't Cartesian, and forests have altitude… anyway, I think closed hashing might do well here. –  Potatoswatter May 12 '10 at 2:03

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The simple solution of calculating all the distances and scanning through seems to run almost instantaneously:

lim = 1;
num_trees = 1000;

trees = randn(num_trees,2); %# list of trees as Nx2 matrix
cur = randn(1,2); %# current point as 1x2 vector
dists = hypot(trees(:,1) - cur(1), trees(:,2) - cur(2)); %# distance from all trees to current point
nearby = tree_ary((dists <= lim),:); %# find the nearby trees, pull them from the original matrix

On a 1.2 GHz machine, I can process 1 million trees (1 MTree?) in < 0.4 seconds.

Are you running the Matlab code directly on the robot? Are you using the Real-Time Workshop or something? If you need to translate this to C, you can replace hypot with sqr(trees[i].x - pos.x) + sqr(trees[i].y - pos.y), and replace the limit check with < lim^2. If you really only need to deal with 1 KTree, I don't know that it's worth your while to implement a more complicated data structure.

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I forgot to mention, this code is going online, meaning it's going on a robot for real-time execution. I don't know if, as the map grows to several miles, using a different data structure will help or if calculating every distance is what it's doing anyway. I'm thinking of duplicate two arrays, sorted by X and the other by Y. Then bubble sort to find the high and low ranges. I do the same for both arrays, X and Y, and then have a third cross link table that will select the individual values. But I don't know, what that's called, how to program that and I'm sure someone already has. –  Phil Salesses May 11 '10 at 23:29
    
if you compare to lim^2, you should not take the square root of the squared sum. –  Jonas May 12 '10 at 3:29
    
@Jonas - I agree. The Matlab code uses hypot, which takes the sqrt, while the suggested C code uses sqr(x) + sqr(y), and which requires comparing to sqr(lim). –  mtrw May 12 '10 at 3:42

You are looking for a spatial database like a quadtree or a kd-tree. I found two kd-tree implementations here and here, but didn't find any quadtree implementations for Matlab.

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You can transform you cartesian coordinates into polar coordinates with CART2POL. Then selecting points inside certain radius will be strait-forward.

[THETA,RHO] = cart2pol(X-X0,Y-Y0);
selected =  RHO < 30;

where X0, Y0 are coordinates of the current location.

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I used your solution as inspiration for a speedup to my solution. Thanks! –  mtrw May 12 '10 at 0:26

My guess is that trees are distributed roughly evenly through the forest. If that is the case, simply use 30x30 (or 15x15) grid blocks as hash keys into an closed hash table. Look up the keys for all blocks intersecting the search circle, and check all hash entries starting at that key until one is flagged as the last in its "bucket."

0---------10---------20---------30--------40---------50----- address # line
(0,0)     (0,30)     (0,60)     (30,0)    (30,30)    (30,60) hash key values

(1,3) (10,15) (3,46) (24,9.) (23,65.) (15,55.) tree coordinates + "." flag

For example, to get the trees in (0,0)…(30,30), map (0,0) to the address 0 and read entries (1,3), (10,15), reject (3,46) because it's out of bounds, read (24,9), and stop because it's flagged as the last tree in that sector.

To get trees in (0,60)…(30,90), map (0,60) to address 20. Skip (24, 9), read (23, 65), and stop as it's last.

This will be quite memory efficient as it avoids storing pointers, which would otherwise be of considerable size relative to the actual data. Nevertheless, closed hashing requires leaving some empty space.

The illustration isn't "to scale" as in reality there would be space for several entries between the hash key markers. So you shouldn't have to skip any entries unless there are more trees than average in a local preceding sector.

This does use hash collisions to your advantage, so it's not as random as a hash function typically is. (Not every entry corresponds to a distinct hash value.) However, as dense sections of forest will often be adjacent, you should randomize the mapping of sectors to "buckets," so a given dense sector will hopefully overflow into a less dense one, or the next, or the next.

Additionally, there is the issue of empty sectors and terminating iteration. You could insert a dummy tree into each sector to mark it as empty, or some other simple hack.

Sorry for the long explanation. This kind of thing is simpler to implement than to document. But the performance and the footprint can be excellent.

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Use some sort of spatially partitioned data structure. A simple solution would be to simply create a 2d array of lists containing all objects within a 30m x 30m region. Worst case is then that you only need to compare against the objects in four of those lists.

Plenty of more complex (and potentially beneficial) solutions could also be used - something like bi-trees are a bit more complex to implement (not by much though), but could get more optimum performance (especially in cases where the density of objects varies considerably).

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You could look at the voronoi diagram support in matlab:

http://www.mathworks.com/access/helpdesk/help/techdoc/ref/voronoi.html

If you base the voronoi polygons on your key trees, and cluster the neighbouring trees into those polygons, that would partition your search space by proximity (finding the enclosing polygon for a given non-key point is fast), but ultimately you're going to get down to computing key to non-key distances by pythagoras or trig and comparing them.

For a few thousand points (trees) brute force might be fast enough if you have a reasonable processor on board. Compute the distance of every other tree from tree n, then select those within 30'. This is the same as having all trees in the same voronoi polygon.

Its been a few years since I worked in GIS but I found the following useful: 'Computational Geometry In C' Joseph O Rourke, ISBN 0-521-44592-2 Paperback.

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