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Is it possible to do the same using Lambda

for (int i = 0; i < objEntityCode.Count; i++)
{
    options.Attributes[i] = new EntityCodeKey();
    options.Attributes[i].EntityCode = objEntityCode[i].EntityCodes;
    options.Attributes[i].OrganizationCode = Constants.ORGANIZATION_CODE;
}

I mean to say to rewrite the statement using lambda. I tried with

Enumerable.Range(0,objEntityCode.Count-1).Foreach(i=> { 
    options.Attributes[i] = new EntityCodeKey(); 
    options.Attributes[i].EntityCode = objEntityCode[i].EntityCodes; 
    options.Attributes[i].OrganizationCode = Constants.ORGANIZATION_CODE; }
);

but not working I am using C#3.0

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2  
Do what using a lambda? –  John Saunders May 12 '10 at 3:07
    
I mean to say to rewrite the statement using lambda. I tried withEnumerable.Range(0,objEntityCode.Count-1).Foreach(i=> { options.Attributes[i] = new EntityCodeKey(); options.Attributes[i].EntityCode = objEntityCode[i].EntityCodes; options.Attributes[i].OrganizationCode = Constants.ORGANIZATION_CODE; }); but not working –  Newbie May 12 '10 at 3:09
1  
Why do you want to do it using lambdas? If your structure relies on the index then it doesn't lend itself to a List.ForEach() structure, and FWIW, loops are a core part of the programming language...how does it improve your program by not using them? –  jeffora May 12 '10 at 3:12
    
It does not deserve the try. It is possible to rewrite it using lambdas... just for educational purposes –  Matias May 12 '10 at 3:14
    
Yes ur right. I basically wanted to say that only. However, I solved. –  Newbie May 12 '10 at 3:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Well you can make it simpler with object initializers, to start with:

for (int i = 0; i < objEntityCode.Count; i++)
{
    options.Attributes[i] = new EntityCodeKey
    {
        EntityCode = objEntityCode[i].EntityCodes,
        OrganizationCode = Constants.ORGANIZATION_CODE
    };
}

I would probably leave it at that though... there's currently no ForEach extension method on IEnumerable<T> - and for good reasons, although I know it's not a universally held opinion ;)

In this case, you'd still need to know i in order to set options.Attributes[i] - unless you could set the whole of options.Attributes in one go, of course... without knowing about the types involved, it's pretty hard to advise further.

If options.Attributes is a writable property (e.g. an array), you could use:

options.Attributes = objEntityCode.Select(code => new EntityCodeKey
    {
        EntityCode = code.EntityCodes,
        OrganizationCode = Constants.ORGANIZATION_CODE
    }).ToArray();

If options.Attributes is actually just a property which returns a type with an indexer, that won't work.

share|improve this answer
    
Sir, what is wrng in the below Enumerable.Range(0, objEntityCode.Count - 1).Select(i => { options.Attributes[i] = new EntityCodeKey { EntityCode = objEntityCode[i].EntityCodes , OrganizationCode = Constants.ORGANIZATION_CODE }; }).ToArray(); Throwing error The type arguments for method 'System.Linq.Enumerable.Select<TSource,TResult>(System.Collections.Generic.IEnum‌​erable<TSource>, System.Func<TSource,TResult>)' cannot be inferred from the usage. Try specifying the type arguments explicitly. –  Newbie May 12 '10 at 3:23
    
Your lambda expression doesn't return anything. It's just a statement. That doesn't really help a Select projection... The other thing that's "wrong" with it is that it introduces a whole heap of stuff for no reason. LINQ is meant to make code simpler, not more complicated. –  Jon Skeet May 12 '10 at 3:26
Enumerable.Range(0, objEntityCode.Count - 1).ToList().ForEach(i => 
                {
                    options.Attributes[i] = new EntityCodeKey(); 
                    options.Attributes[i].EntityCode = objEntityCode[i].EntityCodes;
                    }
                );
share|improve this answer
1  
I'll add the same comment I made on your question: Why do you want to do it like this? How is it any better than explicitly writing the loop? –  jeffora May 12 '10 at 3:14
    
Sir, I am learning LINQ and LAMBDA.... henceforth I try to write those statements. :) –  Newbie May 12 '10 at 3:24
Enumerable.Range(0, objEntityCode.Count - 1).ToList().ForEach(i => 
                {
                    options.Attributes[i] = new EntityCodeKey
                    {
                         EntityCode = objEntityCode[i].EntityCodes
                         , OrganizationCode = Constants.ORGANIZATION_CODE  
                    }; 

                }
             );
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