Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
window.addEventListener('unload', function(e)
{
    MyClass.shutdown();
    window.removeEventListener('unload', /* how to refer to this function? */);
}, false);
share|improve this question
1  
please improve question's title for later searching –  Matthew Lock May 12 '10 at 5:06
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Name your function.

function f(e) {
   MyClass.shutdown();
   window.removeEventListener('unload', f);
}
window.addEventListener('unload', f, false);

Edit I think this will work too. Good point Kobi!

window.addEventListener('unload', function f(e)
{
    MyClass.shutdown();
    window.removeEventListener('unload', f);
}, false);
share|improve this answer
    
well I'm aware of that one, but I don't want to change anonymous function to named... I like the way it is now. –  Pablo May 12 '10 at 5:09
3  
@Michael - the function can be named locally, within its closure. It's a small change. –  Kobi May 12 '10 at 5:13
3  
@Michael: Naming your function is by far the best way to allow yourself to call it. Using arguments.callee is dramatically slower on most current implementations (between 2x and 10x -- yes, really), and won't work with the new "strict mode" of ECMAScript (which you may find you want to start using at some point). Now, the performance aspect doesn't matter for unhooking an onload handler, but just pointing that out in case you apply the pattern elsewhere. –  T.J. Crowder May 12 '10 at 5:37
add comment

Howto use recursion on Anonymous Functions

Lets say we have an anonymous factorial function and we want to do it recursively. How do we call a function without a name? Well in Javascript the arguments.callee property contains a pointer to the currently executing function which means an anonymous function can, indeed, call itself.

alert((function(n){ if(n <= 1){return 1;}else{return n*arguments.callee(n-1);}})(10));

source: http://www.hunlock.com/blogs/Functional_Javascript

share|improve this answer
2  
so it would be just window.removeEventListener('unload',arguments.calee) ? –  Pablo May 12 '10 at 5:07
    
@Michael: With two "l"s, but yes. But in general it's not a good way to do it; see my comment on ykaganovich's answer. –  T.J. Crowder May 12 '10 at 5:38
1  
This is the answer! I really wish this would be chosen instead of the one that is currently. –  Richard Bronosky Feb 22 '13 at 7:47
add comment

The callee property of the arguments object always refers to the called function:

window.addEventListener('unload', function(e)
{
    MyClass.shutdown();
    window.removeEventListener('unload', arguments.callee);
}, false);

See: MDC: callee

share|improve this answer
add comment

I haven't tried this, but how about moving the removeEventListener method call into MyClass itself. The method won't be anonymous, but you won't be polluting the global namespace and it will be part of the class it's manipulating. You can even make it "private". I'm not sure what your style is, but I'd write it something like this:

var MyClass = function(){
  var self = this;
  self.shutdown = function(){ 
    window.removeEventListener('unload',self.shutdown,false);
  };
  self.initialize = function() {
    window.addEventListener('unload',self.shutdown,false);
  };
  return self;
};
var myObject = new MyClass();
myObject.initialize();

I guess it depends on what MyClass does and how you use it.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.