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Its said that property should not be "Set" only (Code analysis rule CA1044 )and it should be "Get" as well. What should i do if I need to set value to a variable from some other class?

The will keep changing so I cannot pass it through constructor.

Shall I create a function for this as shown below?

class A
{

    public void SetValue()
    {
        b = new B();
        b.SetTest(10);
    }
}

class B
{
   int test;

   public void SetTest(int value)
   {
       test = value;
   }
}

What are the other alternatives?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd agree with that it's a bit confusing with write only properties (from a client of the class points of view), so I try to avoid them and instead create a set method of some kind.

The way recommended by Microsoft also seems to be to rewrite it to a method (or make it read and write if suitable): http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms182165.aspx

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You can use a public setter and a private getter, in case you need to access the variable in its own class.

class B {
   public int test { private get; set; }
}
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This seems better alternative to me. But If I can set the value from that class itself then why should have private set? Is it just to have both Set and Get in the property? –  Ram May 12 '10 at 8:16
    
There is no point in setting a value, if you are not going to use that value somewhere. If it's only to trigger an action, then you are better off writing a method, as proposed in the accepted answer. –  Prutswonder May 12 '10 at 11:51

Who said a property should not use only set accessor? I don't see a design flaw in it. If there is one, I will be glad to learn something new:)

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2  
I think it can be confusing in the client code when there's a property that can't be read, it doesn't feel right to me. The "official" reason would be analysis warning CA1044 - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms182165.aspx –  ho1 May 12 '10 at 8:13
    
@ho - Thanks for the CA rule. I forgot to mention that in question. I have updated the question now. –  Ram May 12 '10 at 8:15
    
@ho +1, Thanks for the info. –  Petar Minchev May 12 '10 at 8:36

you mean something like this?

   public int Test { get; set; }
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Your example does not really make much sense since you are not holding on to your instance of B, but you can do something like this:

class A 
{
    private B b;

    public A()
    {
        this.b = new B();
    }

    public void SetValue() 
    { 
        this.b.Test = 10;
    } 
} 

class B 
{ 
   int test; 
   public int Test
   {
       get{ return this.test; }
       set{ this.test = value; }
   }    
} 

Another alternative is to make the Test property an autoproperty (where the framework generates the backing field), like so:

class B 
{ 
   public int Test{get; set;}
} 
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