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I created an enum where I stored some table names. I want it to be used to get the name of the table like ds.Tables[BGuestInfo.TableName.L_GUEST_TYPE.ToString()].

public class a
{
      public enum TableName : byte
            {
                L_GUEST_TYPE = 0
                ,L_AGE_GROUP = 1
                ,M_COMPANY = 2
                ,L_COUNTRY = 3
                ,L_EYE_COLOR = 4
                ,L_GENDER = 5
                ,L_HAIR_COLOR = 6
                ,L_STATE_PROVINCE = 7
                ,L_STATUS = 8
                ,L_TITLE = 9
                ,M_TOWER = 10
                ,L_CITY = 11
                ,L_REGISTER_TYPE = 12
            }
}

class b 
{
    a.TableName x; //trying to restrict this 
    ds.Tables[a.TableName.L_GUEST_TYPE] //accessible and can be used like this
}

This is my enum. Now I have not created any instance of this enum so that no one can use it for other than read only purpose.

For this enum to be accessible in outer classes as well I have to make it public which means some outer class can create its object as well.

So what can i do so as to restrict its instance creation.

share|improve this question
    
Could you give an example of how an instance of an enumeration be created? –  tafa May 12 '10 at 9:11
    
Why do you want to restrict this? –  Lasse V. Karlsen May 12 '10 at 9:20
    
you cannot have instance of an enum, it is a value type. –  vaibhav May 13 '10 at 5:03
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Enums are value types. You cannot create objects/instances from them.

By definition, enums are read only. You cannot modify defined enum values, only use them.

You can restrict visibility by using access modifiers - you can make the enum private to your class:

class b 
{
    private enum TableName : byte
    {
      L_GUEST_TYPE = 0
      ,L_AGE_GROUP = 1
      ,M_COMPANY = 2
      ,L_COUNTRY = 3
      ,L_EYE_COLOR = 4
      ,L_GENDER = 5
      ,L_HAIR_COLOR = 6
      ,L_STATE_PROVINCE = 7
      ,L_STATUS = 8
      ,L_TITLE = 9
      ,M_TOWER = 10
      ,L_CITY = 11
      ,L_REGISTER_TYPE = 12
    }

    public void myMethod(DataSet ds)
    {
      ds.Tables[TableName.L_GUEST_TYPE] //accessible and can be used like this
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
sry for mistyping. I mean instance –  Shantanu Gupta May 12 '10 at 9:06
    
@Shantanu Gupta - You can't instantiate value types. They are not objects. It's like trying to instantiate an int. –  Oded May 12 '10 at 9:08
    
sry but i dont know what "a.TableName x;" step will be called. I think it is declaration. I want to restrict this. –  Shantanu Gupta May 12 '10 at 9:10
    
@Shantanu Gupta - You are declaring a variable of type TableName. –  Oded May 12 '10 at 9:22
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I would probably do something like this:

public class Table
{
  public static readonly Company = new Table("T_Company");
  public static readonly Title = new Table("T_Title");
  public static readonly City = new Table("T_City");

  private string name;

  public string Name { get { return name; } }

  private Table(string name)
  {
    this.name = name;
  }
}

class b 
{
    // ...

    // use it like this:
    ds.Tables[Table.Company.Name];
}

This is similar to the "enum pattern". You write a class which could be used like an enum.

You can add other properties to the Table class, not only the Name. You could also put all the tables into a list (in the constructor) and provide a static property to access all the tables.

And last but not least, if you have different areas in your applications (e.g. modules), you could derive the Table class in each area in order to add additional tables which are only visible to this area.

share|improve this answer
    
I was looking for same functionality. But was trying to avoid creating class –  Shantanu Gupta May 12 '10 at 9:19
    
If you benefit from it because it makes your life easier in some bigger area, creating a class is not an issue. –  Stefan Steinegger May 12 '10 at 10:24
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