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The questions shown below is an interview question

Q)You are given have a datatype, say X in C.

The requirement is to get the size of the datatype, without declaring a variable or a pointer variable of that type,

And, of course without using sizeof operator !

I am not sure if this question was asked before in SO.

Thanks and regards Maddy

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16  
If I answer it, do I get the job? –  Oded May 12 '10 at 9:26
    
@Oded-I am not sure what to answer for that.Y dont u post this question in this forum and get the answers for that,thats better i guess. –  maddy May 12 '10 at 9:31
2  
I guess the correct answer is "always use sizeof!" –  modosansreves May 12 '10 at 9:45
1  
if you are asked this question in an interview you should pull the rip cord and bail out lest you be doomed to work under Dwight K Schrute for the rest of your life... –  kent May 12 '10 at 11:29
2  
What kind of weirdos are interviewing programmers these days? –  nategoose May 12 '10 at 19:01
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can typecast 0 (or any arbitrary value) to type datatype X* to find the size of the datatype, just like the below example:

    #include <stdio.h>

    struct node{
        char c;
        int i;
    };

    int main()
    {
        printf("Sizeof node is: %d\n", ((char *)((struct node *)0 + 1) - (char *)((struct node *)0)));   
// substract 2 consecutive locations starting from 0 that point to type node, 
//typecast these values to char * to give the value in number of bytes.
        return 0;
    }
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1  
Undefined behavior. –  R.. Sep 20 '10 at 3:08
    
Bravo!! super way of finding the size –  eeerahul Oct 7 '11 at 11:29
    
To expand on R..'s comment: computing with invalid pointers such as NULL is not guaranteed to work (even if you don't attempt to dereference them) (see also the discussion on Frank Bollack's answer. It works on many common machines, but not all. –  Gilles Nov 14 '11 at 17:48
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#define sizeof_type( type )  (size_t)((type*)1000 + 1 )-(size_t)((type*)1000)

The original is from this discussion. http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/programming-9/how-to-know-the-size-of-the-variable-without-using-sizeof-469920/

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easy enough - although the 1000 is confusing; can't we just use 0? –  Elemental May 12 '10 at 9:41
    
Yes, you can use 0 also. –  Teddy May 12 '10 at 10:17
1  
Undefined behavior. –  R.. Sep 20 '10 at 3:08
    
To expand on R..'s comment: computing with invalid pointers such as NULL is not guaranteed to work (even if you don't attempt to dereference them) (see also the discussion on Frank Bollack's answer. It works on many common machines, but not all. –  Gilles Nov 14 '11 at 17:49
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This should do the trick:

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct
{
   int i;
   short j;
   char c[5];

} X;

int main(void)
{
   size_t size = (size_t)(((X*)0) + 1);
   printf("%lu", (unsigned long)size);

   return 0;
}

Explanation of size_t size = (size_t)(((X*)0) + 1);

  • assuming a sizeof(X) would return 12 (0x0c) because of alignment
  • ((X*)0) makes a pointer of type X pointing to memory location 0 (0x00000000)
  • + 1 increments the pointer by the the size of one element of type X, so pointing to 0x0000000c
  • the expression (size_t)() casts the address, that is given by the expression (((X*)0) + 1) back to an integral type (size_t)

Hope that gives some insight.

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1  
Actually, the main point in this site is to explain how things work: The way people learn is not by having an answer told to them, it's by having it EXPLAINED. –  Ed Woodcock May 12 '10 at 9:45
4  
Pointer arithmetic on invalid pointers yields undefined behaviour (as does 'void main' and using the wrong printf conversion specifier). –  fizzer May 12 '10 at 10:10
1  
Beside the undefined behaviour, a NULL pointer is not guaranteed to have all bits 0. An implementation is even allowed to have different NULL pointer representations for different types. –  Secure May 12 '10 at 11:14
1  
I don't have the Standard to hand for chapter & verse, but see the discussion of invalid pointers in the Rationale open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/C99RationaleV5.10.pdf –  fizzer May 12 '10 at 11:58
3  
@Thomas: No, even reading the value of an invalid pointer is already undefined behaviour. See page 49 in the link fizzer gave: "Regardless how an invalid pointer is created, any use of it yields undefined behavior." And from the Standard, Annex J.2: "The behavior is undefined in the following circumstances: [...]The value of a pointer to an object whose lifetime has ended is used (6.2.4)." Used, not dereferenced. –  Secure May 12 '10 at 20:19
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Declare a structure with a member of that type, then use offsetof to compute the size?

struct outer
{
     X x;
     char after;
};

offsetof(outer, after) should give you the (aligned) size of x. Note that I'm not declaring a variable of that type per se, nor a pointer to the type, but I'm including it as a member of a structure declaration, where I measure the location of the member that comes after it.

The offsetof macro can be defined as

#define offsetof(S, f) ((size_t)(&((S *)0)->f))
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4  
"without declaring a variable or a pointer variable of that type" ? –  tur1ng May 12 '10 at 9:34
    
@John Källén-Can you please give me a better explanation for that? I am not clear with the answer. –  maddy May 12 '10 at 9:39
1  
I argue that here X is not used a variable, because memory for X is not allocated. –  modosansreves May 12 '10 at 9:42
    
The offsetof macro computes the offset of a member within a structure. If I compute the offset of 'after' in the structure 'outer', I get the number of bytes that are "before" it in that structure. This should be the same as the size of X, with some possible bytes added for alignment. Actually, changing the int to a char would alleviate the alignment constraint. –  John Källén May 12 '10 at 9:45
1  
I'm a bit worried about if the offset of after is required to be the size of x, though. How about: struct outer { X x[2]; }; and then use offsetof(struct outer, x[1])? –  R.. Sep 20 '10 at 3:12
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printf("%d",(int)(&x+1)-(int)&x
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for gnu compiler and tc++ both –  Nadeem Mar 12 '13 at 6:53
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