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var str = 'single words "fixed string of words"';
var astr = str.split(" "); // need fix

i want the array to be like: single, words, fixed string of words.

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up vote 21 down vote accepted
str.match(/\w+|"[^"]+"/g)

//single, words, "fixed string of words"
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2  
this seems to split on '.' and '-' as well as spaces. This should probably be str.match(/\S+|"[^"]+"/g) – Awalias Apr 9 '13 at 13:22
    
There's another problem with this, if it has to handle escaped quotes. For example: 'single words "fixed string of \"quoted\" words"' Even with Awalias' correction, this gives: ["single", "words", ""fixed", "string", ""of", "words""] You'd need to handle escaped quotes, but not trip up and grab and escaped backslash. I think it would eventually get more complicated than you'd really want to handle with a regexp. – jep Jun 20 '13 at 14:55
    
@Awalias I have a better answer below. Your regex example actually should be /[^\s"]+|"([^"]*)"/g. Yours will still split on spaces in quoted areas. I added an answer that fixes this and removes the quotation marks from the results like the OP asked for. – dallin Sep 6 '13 at 0:02

This uses a mix of split and regex matching.

var str = 'single words "fixed string of words"';
var matches = /".+?"/.exec(str);
str = str.replace(/".+?"/, "").replace(/^\s+|\s+$/g, "");
var astr = str.split(" ");
if (matches) {
    for (var i = 0; i < matches.length; i++) {
        astr.push(matches[i].replace(/"/g, ""));
    }
}

This returns the expected result, although a single regexp should be able to do it all.

// ["single", "words", "fixed string of words"]

Update And this is the improved version of the the method proposed by S.Mark

var str = 'single words "fixed string of words"';
var aStr = str.match(/\w+|"[^"]+"/g), i = aStr.length;
while(i--){
    aStr[i] = aStr[i].replace(/"/g,"");
}
// ["single", "words", "fixed string of words"]
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thank, i am going for the improved version – Remi May 12 '10 at 10:23
    
There's a problem with the improved version, where if you use a non-word-character like "#" it will disappear. – tuhoojabotti Jun 26 '12 at 22:03
    
This is a good answer, but if you want to do it all via regex and have the quotes removed, I added a new answer that does this and doesn't require looping through every result to strip out the quotes afterwards. – dallin Sep 6 '13 at 0:25

The accepted answer is not entirely correct. It separates on non-space characters like . and - and leaves the quotes in the results. The better way to do this so that it excludes the quotes is with capturing groups, like such:

//The parenthesis in the regex creates a captured group within the quotes
var myRegexp = /[^\s"]+|"([^"]*)"/gi;
var myString = 'single words "fixed string of words"';
var myArray = [];

do {
    //Each call to exec returns the next regex match as an array
    var match = myRegexp.exec(myString);
    if (match != null)
    {
        //Index 1 in the array is the captured group if it exists
        //Index 0 is the matched text, which we use if no captured group exists
        myArray.push(match[1] ? match[1] : match[0]);
    }
} while (match != null);

myArray will now contain exactly what the OP asked for:

single,words,fixed string of words
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Here might be a complete solution: https://github.com/elgs/splitargs

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I noticed the disappearing characters, too. I think you can include them - for example, to have it include "+" with the word, use something like "[\w\+]" instead of just "\w".

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