Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This is a snippet from a prototype class i am putting together. The scoping workaround feels a little hacky to me, can it be improved or done differently?

var myClass = Class.create({
    initialize: function() {
        $('formid').getElements().each(function(el){
            $(el).observe("blur", function(){
                this.validateEl(el);
            }.bind(this,el));
        },this);
     },
    validateEl: function(el){
      // validate $(el) in here...
    }
});

Also, it seems to me that i could be doing something like this for the event observers:

$('formid').getElements().invoke("observe","blur" ...

Not sure how i would pass the element references in though?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can indeed simplify that a fair bit:

var myClass = Class.create({
    initialize: function() {
        var self = this;

        // To demo that we keep the instance reference, set a
        // property on the instance
        this.message = "Hi there";

        $('formid').getElements().invoke("observe", "blur", blurHandler);

        function blurHandler() {
            // `self` references our instance
            // `this` references the element we're observing
            self.validateEl(this);
        }
    },
    validateEl: function(el){

        // validate $(el) in here...

        // note that because of the way we called it, within this function,
        // `this` references the instance, so for instance:
        this.foo(); // alerts "Hi there!"
    },
    foo: function() {
        alert(this.message);
    }
});

That uses invoke (as you suggested) and a named function for the handler (doesn't have to be named, but I find that it's very helpful to have your functions have names). The handler is a closure. In the initialize function, I use a variable to point to this because the variable will then be available to the closure. (I called it self because that's a standard practice when aliasing this for this reason.) The handler makes use of Prototype's native functionality of setting this within an event handler to the element being observed. When we call validateEl via the closure's self reference, we're calling it as a member function as per normal, so within validateEl, this refers to the instance.

Speaking of named functions, your initialize and validateEl functions are both anonymous, which means on call stacks and such in debuggers, you'll just see "(?)" rather than a nice, handy name. I always recommend actual named functions; more here.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the info on named functions, that's well worth considering. In your example though i presumably would have scope issues if i needed to call another function from within the class within the validateEl function unless i first declared self outside the class – seengee May 12 '10 at 10:46
    
@seengee: No, you could do that with standard this.foo notation. Within validateEl, this will refer to the instance, because of the way we called it. When you make a function call via a property, as with self.validateEl(...), it means "call validateEl and make this within the call equal to self". More here: blog.niftysnippets.org/2008/04/you-must-remember-this.html – T.J. Crowder May 12 '10 at 11:33
    
@seengee: I've updated the example to show that. – T.J. Crowder May 12 '10 at 11:43
    
@TJ - wow, thanks for all the detail. some really good information in there – seengee May 12 '10 at 11:46
    
@TJ - I may well use the other approach but i have learned a great deal from your answer so points to you :) – seengee May 12 '10 at 20:11

I can't see nothing wrong with your code :)

About observers you can to something like this:

$('formid').getElements().invoke("observe","blur", function(e) {
    this.validateEl(e.element());
}.bind(this));
share|improve this answer
    
of course! event.element is perfect in this scenario – seengee May 12 '10 at 10:49
1  
Although it works, using event.element here is a lot more work than is required. Also, although you're safe with blur (because it doesn't bubble), you wouldn't want to do that with click or any event that does bubble, because event.element would return the bottommost element (which could be a span, an em, an a, etc.) that was clicked, not the element you're observing. Sometimes that's what you want, sometimes not. – T.J. Crowder May 12 '10 at 11:36
    
@TJ - good call on the bubbling - when you say that its more work than required do you mean that purely in comparison to your closure example? – seengee May 12 '10 at 11:53
    
@seengee: Closure or binding. But unless it's happening a lot, it doesn't really matter regardless. It's just that event.element does a couple of extra function calls you don't need if you can go direct, but we're talking a couple of calls vs. one or none, which compared to everything else happening around the event probably doesn't really matter. :-) – T.J. Crowder May 12 '10 at 12:18

I think that it will look slightly less verbose if you create a registerBlur method:

var myClass = Class.create({
    initialize: function() {
        $('formid').getElements().each(this.registerBlur, this);
    },
    registerBlur: function(el) {
        Event.observe(el, 'blur', this.validateEl.bind(this, el));
    },
    validateEl: function(el){
      // validate $(el) in here...
    }
});

But I agree with Rui Carneiro, I don't see anything wrong with your code either.

share|improve this answer
    
another approach i really like, thanks! – seengee May 12 '10 at 20:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.